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Crew Bases: Probability  
User currently offlineHighFlyer9790 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 1241 posts, RR: 0
Posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 3701 times:

Hi all,

just wondering: when you are first hired by an airline, (for example AA) how do they place you at a domicile? in AA's case, they have quite a few domiciles, so would it be just a balance of crews at each? also, once hired, could they re-locate you to a different one? what if you want to commute from a city, how would you arrange that? also, if you are already living near a domicile, would they just put you there to save time? also, if you are placed at a domicile with no international ops, once your seniority better and you move up, how do you start a international route? same thing with an aircraft type not at your base?

i know, so many questions! thank you all in advance!!!!

highflyer  wave 


121
89 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineWNCrew From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 1472 posts, RR: 10
Reply 1, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 3692 times:

Quoting HighFlyer9790 (Thread starter):
just wondering: when you are first hired by an airline, (for example AA) how do they place you at a domicile? in AA's case, they have quite a few domiciles, so would it be just a balance of crews at each? also, once hired, could they re-locate you to a different one? what if you want to commute from a city, how would you arrange that? also, if you are already living near a domicile, would they just put you there to save time? also, if you are placed at a domicile with no international ops, once your seniority better and you move up, how do you start a international route? same thing with an aircraft type not at your base?

I'll try to answer your questions one at a time:

Firstly you have to look at how the work-group as a whole is divided up. For instance, at United, ALL FA's are qualified on ALL aircraft so no matter where you are based you could effectively work on any type of aircraft. At American you are ONLY qualified on certain aircraft in regards to your base and also whether you fly domestic or international. (If you are from AA and I am wrong please correct me...this is what I know from friends at AA) SO, you're asking about AA....I would assume you would be Domestic out of training and then based depending on need. Here at WN we've been adding aircraft to Orlando so I know quite a few of the new class are going to Orlando.....staffing needs change based on routes, terminating aircraft etc.

In regards to transferring....yes generally you are allowed to transfer. I know at most airlines you have to stay in each base at least one month but you could change bases each month if you wanted to if the base had openings. I know at one or two carriers though you have to STAY in your initial base until your 6 months of probation is over; I want to say that's United or Continental but I'm not 100%. If the airline needs people at another base and doesn't get enough voluntary transfers then it CAN force-base you there but I wouldn't say that happens often.

If you live close to a base the airline doesn't care. It doesn't do anything for them...they put you where they need you. If you have to commute you just use your airline (and some people commute on other carriers, "offline" commuters....) but sometimes you don't get benefits on other carriers until you've been flying for a bit. Also airlines generally discourage commuting. Remember you're flying standby so you could get bumped. Some carriers have commuter policies in their contracts but you're usually not covered while you're new "on probation" and for some you're not covered when sitting reserve.

As for flying international that goes back to the first part of my post. If you have to "qualify" to fly International based on seniority then I would think you'd have to wait a while. Some people get ahead of the game by speaking a second language....others stay domestic for years. Then at places like United you fly a mix of everything in some bases. Each carrier has a different structure and hopefully you'll get responses from people who can give you more specific information for each carrier.

I fly for WN. We ONLY fly domestic and we have 7 bases, DAL,HOU,PHX,OAK,MDW,BWI, MCO and LAS (opening fall 2007). We're all qualified on everything and we all fly similar trips. Some bases have more productive flying than others but that's because of their location. People get based out of training depending on where there is a need. I was based in OAK out of training, waited 6 months for MDW.....but then after I got here people were coming into MDW right out of training....it's ever-changing.



ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
User currently offlineDoug_Or From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 3408 posts, RR: 3
Reply 2, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 3689 times:

Everything is bid by senority. If you are a new hire that means they have open positions. Those positions are made available to current employees (those senior to you) first. Whatever is left over will then be bid on by the new hires, who will be awarded the positions in seniority order within the class (usualy determined by age or social security #). Policies vary by airline but they very rarely force move you. When they do they will generaly pay moving expenses. If you base doesn't have certain equipment or operations types then you can't bid for them, you must go to a base that has it. Commuting is something you do on your own using your non-rev benifits. Its free for most pilots due to jumpseat privledges, but the responsibility to get to work on time is yours, and you will be a standby passenger, so weather, maintance, and peak holidays loads can ruin you day.


When in doubt, one B pump off
User currently offlineHighFlyer9790 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 1241 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 3683 times:

Thank you very much WNCrew and Doug_Or for your informative responces!!

Quoting WNCrew (Reply 1):
Some people get ahead of the game by speaking a second language

WNCrew-this statement interests me a lot. Are you saying as a pilot for example, you could overide a bid by seniority if you spoke a second language, say french, and be placed on CDG route? how exactly does that work?


thanks!

highflyer  wave 



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User currently offlineDoug_Or From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 3408 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 3682 times:

It means nothing for a pilot, but as an F/A airlines may allow more junior people to get international trips if they speak the right foerign tongue. Not sure how it works, but perhaps there are a certain # of spots on various trips that can only be bid by languege qualified crewmembers?


When in doubt, one B pump off
User currently offlineWNCrew From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 1472 posts, RR: 10
Reply 5, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 3680 times:

Quoting HighFlyer9790 (Reply 3):
WNCrew-this statement interests me a lot. Are you saying as a pilot for example, you could overide a bid by seniority if you spoke a second language, say french, and be placed on CDG route? how exactly does that work?

Well, I know I have several friends at CO who were all hired at the same time. Most of them are still on reserve...they don't have enough seniority to hold a line, but two of them are foreign lang. speakers so they are holding lines to the language destinations...ie French-CDG etc. You're technically NOT overiding the bid, you're sort of in a different category. Foreign destination flights are required (by the airline I assume) to have speakers on board so it's almost like you're in a different "virtual base".

DISCLAIMER: I don't want to lead anyone down the wrong path. This is just how I've understood it through friends at other carriers since the industry as a whole operates pretty similarly. I could be wrong on some points, OTHERS please correct me if I'm wrong.



ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
User currently offlineDoug_Or From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 3408 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 3677 times:

Quoting WNCrew (Reply 5):

Just to clarify, you're talking about F/As, right?

I only mention it becuase highflyer mentioned pilots in his particular question.



When in doubt, one B pump off
User currently offlineWNCrew From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 1472 posts, RR: 10
Reply 7, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 3676 times:

Quoting Doug_Or (Reply 6):
Just to clarify, you're talking about F/As, right?

I'm so sorry guys, I should read more carefully. Now I've created all sorts of crap that you'll have to scroll past....

Sorry



ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
User currently offlineAAR90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 3474 posts, RR: 46
Reply 8, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 3671 times:

Limiting this to AA pilots (there are far too many variations by airline/crew positions out there)....

Quoting HighFlyer9790 (Thread starter):
just wondering: when you are first hired by an airline, (for example AA) how do they place you at a domicile?

Open pilot positions are called "vacancies" and are filled by seniority bid. New hires will "bid" for known openings and will be trained on proper equipment to fill that vacancy.

Quoting HighFlyer9790 (Thread starter):
in AA's case, they have quite a few domiciles, so would it be just a balance of crews at each?

No, a new hire pilot will fill remaining vacancies. There is no "balance" of crews, but rather a "requirement" at each base to fill the flying assigned.

Quoting HighFlyer9790 (Thread starter):
also, once hired, could they re-locate you to a different one?

Yes, but you have to bid and be awarded such assignment based upon your system seniority.

Quoting HighFlyer9790 (Thread starter):
what if you want to commute from a city, how would you arrange that?

You are on your own. Most pilots try to use recipical cockpit jumpseat agreements with other airlines (fewer folks competing for those seats).

Quoting HighFlyer9790 (Thread starter):
also, if you are already living near a domicile, would they just put you there to save time?

No, you go where AA needs you based upon what your seniority will hold.

Quoting HighFlyer9790 (Thread starter):
also, if you are placed at a domicile with no international ops, once your seniority better and you move up, how do you start a international route?

You commute to wherever your crew base is (see above).

Quoting HighFlyer9790 (Thread starter):
same thing with an aircraft type not at your base?

Bid by seniority.



*NO CARRIER* -- A Naval Aviator's worst nightmare!
User currently offlineDoug_Or From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 3408 posts, RR: 3
Reply 9, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 3664 times:

Quoting WNCrew (Reply 7):
I'm so sorry guys, I should read more carefully. Now I've created all sorts of crap that you'll have to scroll past....

Sorry

No worries, I learned something and the first post didn't specify anyway. I was just making sure we were all on the same page.



When in doubt, one B pump off
User currently offlineHighFlyer9790 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 1241 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 3651 times:

Thanks AAR90..great answers.

Quoting WNCrew (Reply 7):
I'm so sorry guys, I should read more carefully. Now I've created all sorts of crap that you'll have to scroll past....

no worries!

Quoting Doug_Or (Reply 9):
I was just making sure we were all on the same page.

Thanks Doug_Or!


great responces! So as a pilot, the whole language deal is out.....ouch!


highflyer  wave 



121
User currently offlineKingAirMan From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 291 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 3640 times:

A friend of mine going to American Eagle as a pilot, said you can pick your base . Is this true ? I asked him what type of Aircraft he was going to fly, actually more or less how this was selected, he said after the initial class, you bid your base, which in turn helps narrow down the a/c you will fly. Anyone have any info on who decided if you fly a Saab 340 or a ERJ, CRJ.? I know that ATR is based soley out of miami. Correct me if im wrong


kingairman


User currently offlineAirWillie6475 From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 2448 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 3618 times:

For pilots it depends on what type of aircraft you're going to fly.

Quoting HighFlyer9790 (Thread starter):

just wondering: when you are first hired by an airline, (for example AA) how do they place you at a domicile? in AA's case, they have quite a few domiciles, so would it be just a balance of crews at each? also, once hired, could they re-locate you to a different one? what if you want to commute from a city, how would you arrange that? also, if you are already living near a domicile, would they just put you there to save time? also, if you are placed at a domicile with no international ops, once you

It all depends on what type of aircraft you're going to fly. You will train for a few weeks at the company then transfer to your base. Relocation is all up to the employee, they don't care where you live you're going to have to be based where the aircraft type is based. For this reason many commute flights to get to work, commuting sucks unless the route you commute is served by many ailrines. There are pro and cons to commuting. You get to live where you want however commuting will take valuable time away from your personal life and sometimes you have to use your day off to commute to ensure that you get there in time for your duty. Most pilots that I've talked to say avoid commuting at all costs if you can.

Quoting KingAirMan (Reply 11):
A friend of mine going to American Eagle as a pilot, said you can pick your base . Is this true ? I asked him what type of Aircraft he was going to fly, actually more or less how this was selected, he said after the initial class, you bid your base, which in turn helps narrow down the a/c you will fly. Anyone have any info on who decided if you fly a Saab 340 or a ERJ, CRJ.? I know that ATR is based soley out of miami. Correct me if im wrong

It's true. AE has been desperate for pilots and as an incentive to bring in whatever they can find they have started to offer base prefferene to new hires before they start training. From what I've heard you can pretty much get any type of aircraft right now, yes any, they are that desperate. Chicago based ERJ seems very popular.


User currently offlineHighFlyer9790 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 1241 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 3575 times:

Quoting AirWillie6475 (Reply 12):
they don't care where you live you're going to have to be based where the aircraft type is based.

what if you are more senior and are rated on more than one of an airlines aircraft...could you end up flying all those types in one 4 day trip or is it one aircraft type per cycle?



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User currently offlineAirWillie6475 From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 2448 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 3571 times:

common aircraft like a319/320 yes, 737/757 no.

User currently offlineJblake1 From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 292 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 3565 times:

what is a line? and what does "holding a line" mean?

User currently offlineAAR90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 3474 posts, RR: 46
Reply 16, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 3562 times:

Quoting HighFlyer9790 (Reply 13):
what if you are more senior and are rated on more than one of an airlines aircraft...could you end up flying all those types in one 4 day trip or is it one aircraft type per cycle?

At AA... NO. You are only "current" in one "type" at a time and only hold a "bid position" for a single "type" at any one time. Not all that long ago AA pilots could hold multi-bid positions, but that went away (costs $$$ to maintain currency) not so recently.  Wink Only "common" type ratings AA currently has are 767/757.

Quoting Jblake1 (Reply 15):
what is a line? and what does "holding a line" mean?

A "line" holder is someone who has a known schedule for the contractual month. Different than a "reserve" (non-line holder) pilot who only has a schedule of days on/off. i.e. I hold line #101 this month.  Wink



*NO CARRIER* -- A Naval Aviator's worst nightmare!
User currently offlineHighflyer9790 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 1241 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 3551 times:

Quoting AirWillie6475 (Reply 14):
could you end up flying all those types in one 4 day trip or is it one aircraft type per cycle?



Quoting AirWillie6475 (Reply 14):
common aircraft like a319/320 yes, 737/757 no.



Quoting AAR90 (Reply 16):
You are only "current" in one "type" at a time and only hold a "bid position" for a single "type" at any one time.

(example) So for someone flying for AA based at BOS and rated on the 737, 757, 767, and 777, they can only fly the BOS-LHR flight if they choose to fly the 777 that month? (BOS-LHR is the only BOS 777 scheduled flight)



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User currently offlineAAR90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 3474 posts, RR: 46
Reply 18, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 3537 times:

Quoting Highflyer9790 (Reply 17):
(example) So for someone flying for AA based at BOS and rated on the 737, 757, 767, and 777, they can only fly the BOS-LHR flight if they choose to fly the 777 that month?

There is no monthly "choice." You bid (by seniority) for job vacancies usually once per month for openings 2-3 months from when you bid. Once you are awarded/assigned the job, that becomes your new bid status for a minimum of (I think) one year. You can only hold one bid status at a time, so IF the pilot in your example held BOS/777/I bid status, then he would fly only 777 trips that originate/end at BOS. He can NOT fly any other equipment until his bid status changes. The only pilots holding "multiple bid status" jobs at AA are TULE Test Pilots.



*NO CARRIER* -- A Naval Aviator's worst nightmare!
User currently offlineDoug_Or From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 3408 posts, RR: 3
Reply 19, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 3534 times:

Quoting Highflyer9790 (Reply 17):
(example) So for someone flying for AA based at BOS and rated on the 737, 757, 767, and 777, they can only fly the BOS-LHR flight if they choose to fly the 777 that month? (BOS-LHR is the only BOS 777 scheduled flight)

They would only be current on the 777. While type ratings do not expire, your currency on an aircraft does. No part 121 US airline I know of pays for their pilots to remain current on multiple aircraft.



When in doubt, one B pump off
User currently offlineHighFlyer9790 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 1241 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 3494 times:

Quoting AAR90 (Reply 18):
You can only hold one bid status at a time, so IF the pilot in your example held BOS/777/I bid status, then he would fly only 777 trips that originate/end at BOS. He can NOT fly any other equipment until his bid status changes.



Quoting Doug_Or (Reply 19):
They would only be current on the 777. While type ratings do not expire, your currency on an aircraft does. No part 121 US airline I know of pays for their pilots to remain current on multiple aircraft.

So how long does a currency last? after this bid period, could you bid on another aircraft if you are current?

Quoting Doug_Or (Reply 19):
No part 121 US airline I know of pays for their pilots to remain current on multiple aircraft.

So if your currency experires, you can only bid one one aircraft??



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User currently offlineAAR90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 3474 posts, RR: 46
Reply 21, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 3479 times:

Quoting HighFlyer9790 (Reply 20):
So how long does a currency last?

To keep things simple use the following generalization: as long as you complete all of your airline's Recurrent Training on-schedule you will always remain "current" in that type aircraft for that airline.

Quote:
...after this bid period, could you bid on another aircraft if you are current?

Understand that we are speaking about two different subjects: JOB vacancies and monthly LINES of flying. At AA, pilots bid every month (normally 12-17th) for the following month's LINES of flying (your monthly work schedule). That has nothing to do with changing aircraft type. Changing equipment (777, 757/767, 737, A300, S80), crew base (LAX, DFW, MIA, etc.), division (international, domestic) and seat (CA, FO) are all filled via a JOB VACANCIES bid run that occurs 2-3 months PRIOR to the actual effective date of the change --gives time to complete necessary training, etc.

Quote:
So if your currency experires, you can only bid one one aircraft??

AA pilots are CONTRACTUALLY limited to a single bid status at any one time. IOW, you can only bid one aircraft at any one time no matter what your currency is. That is a CONTRACTUAL requirement. If your currency expires (rare, but it does happen) you will be required to return for recurrent training at AA's Flight Academy PRIOR to your NEXT FLIGHT (AA will automatically remove you from the trip).



*NO CARRIER* -- A Naval Aviator's worst nightmare!
User currently offlineHighFlyer9790 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 1241 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 20 hours ago) and read 3449 times:

Quoting AAR90 (Reply 21):
To keep things simple use the following generalization: as long as you complete all of your airline's Recurrent Training on-schedule you will always remain "current" in that type aircraft for that airline.



Quoting AAR90 (Reply 21):
Understand that we are speaking about two different subjects: JOB vacancies and monthly LINES of flying. At AA, pilots bid every month (normally 12-17th) for the following month's LINES of flying (your monthly work schedule). That has nothing to do with changing aircraft type. Changing equipment (777, 757/767, 737, A300, S80), crew base (LAX, DFW, MIA, etc.), division (international, domestic) and seat (CA, FO) are all filled via a JOB VACANCIES bid run that occurs 2-3 months PRIOR to the actual effective date of the change --gives time to complete necessary training, etc.

ah i didnt make that connection....so the only way to change lines of flying (i.e aircraft, int'l, base as mentioned above) is to wait for a vacancy, which is then filled by the seniority of the applicant?



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User currently offlineAAR90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 3474 posts, RR: 46
Reply 23, posted (7 years 7 months 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 3404 times:

Quoting HighFlyer9790 (Reply 22):
ah i didnt make that connection....so the only way to change lines of flying (i.e aircraft, int'l, base as mentioned above) is to wait for a vacancy, which is then filled by the seniority of the applicant?

I think you've got it.  bigthumbsup  The last Job Vacancy run (first week of Feb?) was for an April 1st effective date. It listed known openings, planned displacements (fewer jobs at a crew base) and reminders on how to update your Standing Bid List --a computer file that has all of your preferences, displacement choices, etc. for how you want to handle any potenial change(s) to your job status.



*NO CARRIER* -- A Naval Aviator's worst nightmare!
User currently offlineHighFlyer9790 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 1241 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (7 years 7 months 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 3395 times:

Quoting AAR90 (Reply 23):
I think you've got it. The last Job Vacancy run (first week of Feb?) was for an April 1st effective date. It listed known openings, planned displacements (fewer jobs at a crew base) and reminders on how to update your Standing Bid List --a computer file that has all of your preferences, displacement choices, etc. for how you want to handle any potenial change(s) to your job status.

thanks a lot AAR90! so if you plan to move up the chain to bigger aircraft and int'l ops, switching bases is inevidible?



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25 AAR90 : Not necessarily. I am a "worry-wart" commuter (did one year SAN-BNA on company paid passes) and will not commute again unless AA closes LAX (not like
26 HighFlyer9790 : how does BOS stand as a crew base...lots of opportunities?
27 AAR90 : I think that depends upon your definition of "opportunities." BOS has been historically a senior base, but with a decent number of junior folks. Righ
28 HighFlyer9790 : we've been talking about aircraft currencies, etc. Because BOS has every AA aircraft operated there (except the A300) does this mean if a junior is l
29 AAR90 : BOS pilots only fly 777, 767/757, S80 acft. There is no AA pilot crew base that flys every AA acft.
30 HighFlyer9790 : it just occured to me: could you stay based in BOS and move up only flying BOS based aircraft? or do you have to fly every aircraft in order to move
31 AAR90 : As long as your seniority will allow it... yes. No _requirement_ to "move up" in equipment. At AA, the only required upgrade is to Captain. When your
32 HighFlyer9790 : Who wouldn't want to upgrade to captain? i understand there may be a paycut depending on how many years you were an F/O, but i thought this would be
33 AirWillie6475 : Well it depends on the airline and the fleet. If you ailine only flys a 737 or an A320 then upgrade is a no brainer but if your airline has a complic
34 AAR90 : Primarily, those who do or know they will have difficulty. Although I did know a few very senior FOs who put off upgrading for as long as possible ju
35 Highflyer9790 : Does that mean they will hire you until a reasonable age, or you have to be a captain coming from your former employer? As a separate question- if yo
36 AirWillie6475 : Wow, the initial training must be hard then.
37 AAR90 : Primarily age. If, at the time the hire/no hire decision is being made, AA projections have you reaching age-60 prior to the projected upgrade to CA
38 HAL : AAR90 has done a great job explaining how seniority works at a major airline, and how it affects everything you do there from bidding bases to aircraf
39 HighFlyer9790 : But routes are a bid based on seniority. for example, if you were BOS based and 757/767 rated, you probably wouldn't get a 767 BOS-CDG your first few
40 AAR90 : All AA pilots hold a 4-part bid status: Base - Seat - Equipment - Division. All monthly trip awards are offered up for bid within each 4-part bid sta
41 HighFlyer9790 : I would assume it is the same way for F/Os? Although i assume it would hard to answer, how long does it take on avergae at say AA to move to a differ
42 AAR90 : Correct. Just change "CA" to "FO" in the 4-part bid status. Not "hard" but damn near impossible. Too many pilots, too many bases, too many bid status
43 Post contains links and images HighFlyer9790 : Maybe i should have started a different thread for this question, but this thread is very imformaive... as i was looking at payscales www.airlinepilot
44 Post contains images AAR90 : First look at your years of service... i.e. a new hire pilot is in year 1. Next look at equipment & position... i.e. all equipment, Captain pay is $35
45 Post contains images HighFlyer9790 : ooo i get it! so the only way there could be a s year CA is if a FO upgraded in his 2nd year? (which wouldnt happen )
46 HAL : If you meant a 1st year captain, no, a 1st year Captain is someone who is flying as a captain and was hired less than 12 months ago. If a FO upgraded
47 Post contains images HighFlyer9790 : Sorry for the typo i meant: so the only way there could be a 2nd year CA is if a FO upgraded in his 2nd year? yup i understand it now also, if you up
48 Post contains images HAL : Once you get to the airlines, you'll see that there really isn't any 'normal' or 'logical' progression that everyone follows. People bid for what the
49 HighFlyer9790 : thanks HAL for the response! another question! how many bid periods in a year? 12 or 13? for some reason i thought i heard somewhere 13....
50 HAL : If you're talking about vacancy/upgrade bids, it depends greatly on the size of the airline. At Hawaiian, we get maybe two or three bids per year, al
51 Post contains images HighFlyer9790 : near the neginning of this thread we were talking about trips and starting bases, etc. i think i gathered that all of your flights begin and terminate
52 Post contains links HighFlyer9790 : ooops.. another question! as i was looking at the AA payscale www.airlinepilotcentral.com it ends at year 12. so after 12 years with the airline, unle
53 Post contains images HAL : All airlines I know of require the company to have a pilot begin and and their trips at their base. There may be a deadhead leg involved, but that wo
54 AAR90 : AA tries to have vacancy bid runs about once per month. The attempt (for the last few years) is to keep an even flow of pilots through "the schoolhou
55 Post contains images HighFlyer9790 : thanks so much HAL and AAR90! from quite earlier in the thread: would it be feasable to fly the 767 one bid period the 777 another? (assuming you hold
56 HighFlyer9790 : Meant to put it in my last post, thanks AAR90 for going taking the time to post all that. AAR90, more you than anybody could probably answer this (of
57 AAR90 : You are implying a move back-and-forth-and-back again... correct? If so, then NO that should not happen at AA. Every job vacancy award carries with i
58 HighFlyer9790 : well, that answers my question! But when you say "job lock" is that aircraft lock, seat lock, or "eveything lock?" from what ive gathered, it seems t
59 Post contains images AAR90 : Everything! "Lateral Transfer" (someone with identical equipment/seat/division bid status) is permitted, but at no cost to AA (no moving, no missed t
60 Post contains images HighFlyer9790 : yea, i think i was jumping the gun. not sure why, but for some reason, i just thought it for a moment. in that case, is any hour of the day fair game
61 Post contains images AAR90 : Yes. Trip can start or end on any flight to/from one's crew base. Feb. all of my trips started mid-afternoon and ended late night. March all my trips
62 Post contains images HighFlyer9790 : Must be that seniority coming into play again! luck you! congrats at the 20 years! I listen to BOS with my scanner/liveatc.net and i would guess the
63 AAR90 : A matter of openings. Historically, BOS has been relatively senior amongst east coast AA pilot bases so movement is relatively slow. Pilots often bid
64 HighFlyer9790 : out of AA's 9,000 some odd pilots, around where would your seniority number start to have more pull? and what would be considered a senior number? of
65 AirWillie6475 : Not number, it depends on how long you've been at your position. Senior FOs, chose better schedules, Junior CAs are stuck with reserve or weekend/red
66 AAR90 : Impossible to answer as your question is too "subjective." A company seniority number is relatively useless as everything is broken down into bidding
67 HighFlyer9790 : that all makes sense..thanks AAR90!
68 HighFlyer9790 : Instead of starting anew thread i have some questions i thought of the past few days.... If you hold a 767/Int'l bid status, could a trip theoreticall
69 Charlienorth : A friend of mine is a capt. for UAl he does similar trips. 757/767 is a common bid fleet at most airlines,you are rated on both.
70 HighFlyer9790 : ya, i phrased that awkwardly. if you are a 737 CA, can you go to the 757/767 as a CA if your seniority allows or do you have to become a FO on a new
71 HAL : Everything, and I mean Everything, is based on seniority. If a 737 CA can hold a 757/767 CA position and wants it, he can have it, and doesn't have t
72 AAR90 : At AA, yes... to a limited extent. Used to be "domestic" flights were flown by domestic crews and "international" flights were flown by international
73 Post contains images HighFlyer9790 : Wow. i always thought you had to become a FO on any type first....now i can really see how much the whole "seniority is freedom" is really true! so g
74 HighFlyer9790 : One other thing- How does a non-crew base international flight work? i.e. NW A330 BOS-AMS? would the crew first do a DTW-AMS-BOS-AMS-DTW?
75 AAR90 : Not that "clear cut." For example, LAX/777 crews fly both NRT and LHR. At AA, it is a First Officer bid position (called FB or FC on the monthly bid
76 Highflyer9790 : As far as bid periods go, do airlines have 12 or 13 or does it vary?
77 AAR90 : Most USA airlines operate very closely to the calendar months (plus or minus a day to make the "contract month"). For example; AA pilot contract month
78 KingAirMan : Is the Miami- ATR base for American Eagle hard to get as a new hire ? ATR's around the carribean is something I am looking into when I apply to Eagle.
79 HighFlyer9790 : American eagle is now letting new hires choose base & equipment...
80 HighFlyer9790 : Yup..another question! (hope y'all dont mind!) For many airlines, there is a list of avg. hours a month flown by line and another avg for reserve pilo
81 AAR90 : I can only answer for AA... A "line pilot" holds a schedule for the entire month. From that line he can try to trade trips (between pilots or between
82 Post contains images HighFlyer9790 : These days I'm surprised the as generous to give you the highest time... Are reserve pilots junior/new hire pilots only, or do you choose to be on re
83 Post contains images AAR90 : Both. Really depends upon what the lines of flying are like. For example; virtually all LAX 767 Int'l trips are "red-eyes" so the "day-trips" go seni
84 Post contains images HighFlyer9790 : With legacy finances the way they are, i would hope the airline takes care of typing you and accomodations during any classes at their base? How long
85 AAR90 : Good question... I haven't really thought about other airlines since AA continues to pay my salary (any missed trips or set pay/day if no missed trip
86 Post contains images HighFlyer9790 : Ah I see. Could a pilot thats say typed in the 737 & 757/767 and holds any other relevant status bid one period on 737 schedule, and another period o
87 Post contains images AAR90 : Not at AA. For example; I hold DC9, 737, 757/767 type ratings, but can only bid the LAX/737/CA/D position for next month (bids "close" on 4/17). IF I
88 HighFlyer9790 : Cool! isnt there some dress code system- i.e. if the jacket is off, you cant wear the hat, and vice versa? or no long sleeve shirt w/o the jacket? (j
89 AAR90 : Yes, all airlines have a "dress code" as pertains to the wearing of their uniforms. Not worth going into the details in this forum.
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