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What's The Speed Limit At Airports?  
User currently offlineCoolGuy From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 414 posts, RR: 0
Posted (7 years 6 months 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 26720 times:

Suppose an aircraft is on a straight taxiway in clear weather with no other aircraft around at JFK. What's the maximum speed?

66 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 1, posted (7 years 6 months 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 26810 times:
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In many cases, the maximum taxi speed is governed by the individual company's ops manual. I know of one that calls for taxi speeds not to exceed that of a "brisk walk". Actually limiting taxi speeds to a "brisk walk", of course, would grind things to a halt at congested airports...so in reality, the limitation is largely ignored for the sake of operational efficiency.


2H4





Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6370 posts, RR: 3
Reply 2, posted (7 years 6 months 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 26780 times:

As 2H4 pointed out, the literal wording is "taxi no faster than a man can walk," however in reality you will hold up the show if you taxi that slow  Smile There's some give and take, but should you taxi too fast and cause an accident during a ground movement by taxiing too quickly, well, that's your ticket and your pride that are on the line  Wink

I suppose with GPS you can actually gauge your groundspeed these days, however the airspeed indicator will always read "0" (except when taxiing into a strong headwind  Wink ). I remember one night landing at TTD (Troutdale, OR) with a very strong wind straight down the runway. After an incredibly short landing (we made the first taxiway exit  Wink ), the airspeed in the 172 was reading 40 knots...and taxiing back was a royal pain in the rump because the plane wanted to weathervane into the wind (good time for remembering how to hold the controls while taxiing in a strong wind!).



Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
User currently offlineCptspeaking From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 639 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (7 years 6 months 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 26749 times:

Are you WN or any other airline?  spin 

(disregarding the hypothetical location)

Your CptSpeaking



...and don't call me Shirley!!
User currently offlinePhilSquares From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (7 years 6 months 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 26752 times:

Generally, you'll find most companies limit taxi speed on long straight taxiways to between 20-25 knots. I do know of some airlines who monitor excessive taxi speeds and use the DFDR to ensure compliance.

On the 744/747 90 degree turns with full tiller are limited to 10 knots.


User currently offlineStealthZ From Australia, joined Feb 2005, 5689 posts, RR: 44
Reply 5, posted (7 years 6 months 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 26707 times:
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Quoting KELPkid (Reply 2):
man can walk

Generally considered to be approx 4MPH or 6.4KPH.
DOM2 at SYD to holding point T6 RWY 34R is approx 4.5KM, at walking pace would comprise 45min or so of a 1hr 25min block time(SYD-BNE), walking pace I don't think so!

I do understand how that walking speed restriction would (and likely should) apply in the ramp area though!

Cheers



If your camera sends text messages, that could explain why your photos are rubbish!
User currently offlineConcordeBoy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (7 years 6 months 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 26437 times:

I know MSY's management has jokingly threatened WN with speedbumps in the past...

...and on the opposite end of the spectrum are AA's S80s.


User currently offlineZkpilot From New Zealand, joined Mar 2006, 4818 posts, RR: 9
Reply 7, posted (7 years 5 months 4 weeks 1 day ago) and read 26281 times:

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 1):


In many cases, the maximum taxi speed is governed by the individual company's ops manual. I know of one that calls for taxi speeds not to exceed that of a "brisk walk". Actually limiting taxi speeds to a "brisk walk", of course, would grind things to a halt at congested airports...so in reality, the limitation is largely ignored for the sake of operational efficiency.

maybe on the apron... out on the taxiways especially for a long taxi that would take forever! 3000m! I'd say most planes taxi around at about 25km/h (15mph) but often faster or if busy then slower.



56 types. 38 countries. 24 airlines.
User currently offlineJETBLUEATASW From United States of America, joined Feb 2007, 56 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 26124 times:

I agree that the average speed limit is about 15-20mph. If u fly jetblue, the mapquest channel allows u to view that kind of stuff. Last time i flew Jetblue in August 2006, the taxi speed was 20mph if i recall correctly


"DO ME A FAVOR WOULD YA, THE NEXT TIME U LAND A PLANE ON MY STRIP, BONE UP ON YOUR MORSE CODE"-Tom Berenger
User currently offlineEridanMan From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 121 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 26094 times:

Its funny actually, as a student who is just a few hours from my checkflight, I commented to my instructor the other day that throughout the whole learning process, we never formally touched on 'taxi speed'.

He laughed and said it was one of those things where, really, you just kinda have to 'feel' it. On a ramp? Absolutely no faster than someone can walk... Taxi to the end of a 5200 foot active in a spam-can? you can be the tower appreciates maintaining a reasonably brisk clip...

I think the term 'Reasonable and Prudent' is probably the best descriptor of Taxi speed limits, for any aircraft.


User currently offlineBlackbird From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 26066 times:

PhilSquares,

Which airlines are really so anal about taxi speeds that they actually check the DFDR to ensure compliance?

Andrea K


User currently offlineTheSonntag From Germany, joined Jun 2005, 3564 posts, RR: 29
Reply 11, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 25941 times:

Just sit in a Ryanair plane... I think they beat all others on that term  Wink

User currently offlinePhilSquares From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 25936 times:

Quoting Blackbird (Reply 10):
PhilSquares,

Which airlines are really so anal about taxi speeds that they actually check the DFDR to ensure compliance?

It's not a matter of checking but the software in the DFDR will record an event and it's sent via ACARS and the DFDR is then analyized to see what the event was. I can think of several airlines that monitor taxi speed and virtually all airlines that have current generation aircraft have a Flight Data Analysis Program or a program extremely similar.


User currently offlineBlackbird From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 25845 times:

What airlines monitor taxi speeds? (Instinctively you'd figure people would have better things to do than monitor the taxi speed)

Andrea K


User currently offlinePhilSquares From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 25833 times:

Quoting Blackbird (Reply 13):
What airlines monitor taxi speeds? (Instinctively you'd figure people would have better things to do than monitor the taxi speed)

Andrea K

As I discretely tried to write, all airlines that have a FOQA, or some other program will monitor taxispeed. Even things like N1 are monitored while taxying. It's all electronic and requires no effort......


User currently offlineWing From Turkey, joined Oct 2000, 1560 posts, RR: 24
Reply 15, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 25822 times:

Quoting Blackbird (Reply 10):
PhilSquares,

Which airlines are really so anal about taxi speeds that they actually check the DFDR to ensure compliance

More than you can imagine,if we think about many aviation accidents occur on the ground rather than in the air.Actually not only the taxi speeds but all stages of the flight is monitored by the "big brothers" and our training department issues memorandums about the mistakes.This is particularly useful against some pilots who constantly disobeys the SOP standards.



Widen your world
User currently offlineLegoguy From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2006, 3312 posts, RR: 39
Reply 16, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 25806 times:

What's the taxi speed limit when turning off the runway onto a fast exit taxiway (taxiway with a small angle between the runway)?


Can you say 'Beer Can' without sounding like a Jamaican saying 'Bacon'?
User currently offlineOly720man From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 6698 posts, RR: 11
Reply 17, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 25796 times:

I was once talking to someone at MAN and he said the police had clocked RYR planes doing 50 or 60mph (the speed check presumably out of curiosity). Time is money, I suppose.


wheat and dairy can screw up your brain
User currently offlineBlackbird From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 25771 times:

Phil Squares,

I take it Southwest, and Ryanair don't check taxi-speeds? :p


User currently offlineTheCol From Canada, joined Jan 2007, 2038 posts, RR: 6
Reply 19, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 25725 times:

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 1):
I know of one that calls for taxi speeds not to exceed that of a "brisk walk".



Quoting KELPkid (Reply 2):
"taxi no faster than a man can walk,"

WestJet defines "walking speed" as 6km/h. Mind you, that usually applies to ground staff (ie. push-back) rather than the plane itself. Transport Canada regulations state that no vehicle an exceed 25km/h on the apron. Again, that may differ from aircraft movement regs.



No matter how random things may appear, there's always a plan.
User currently offlineBlackbird From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 25717 times:

PhilSquares,

I more accurately meant to say which airlines actually care a lot about taxi speeds, btw

Andrea Kent


User currently offlinePhilSquares From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 25651 times:

Quoting Blackbird (Reply 20):
PhilSquares,

I more accurately meant to say which airlines actually care a lot about taxi speeds, btw

Andrea Kent

If an airline has a FOQA (or similar) program they can set whatever threshold they want for excursions. For example, stabilized approaches are a big one. So, at my airline, an excursion is when you're below 1000' AGL, gear is not down, or flaps aren't in the landing position and EPR is not 1.01 or above. You will get a letter from the FOQA people asking if you can remember what happened on this flight and this date. In addition, you get a print out of about 3 minutes worth of data.

As far as what airlines care about taxi speed, I'd day all do. It's spelled out in the SOP. Perhaps WN and FR have higher taxi speeds in their SOP. It's not something that comes directly from the aircraft manufacturer.


User currently offlineBlackbird From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 25582 times:

So all airlines pay attention to it?

Andrea


User currently offlineTheSonntag From Germany, joined Jun 2005, 3564 posts, RR: 29
Reply 23, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 25526 times:

Quoting Blackbird (Reply 18):
I take it Southwest, and Ryanair don't check taxi-speeds? :p

Maybe they order a minimum speed  Wink


User currently offlineBlackbird From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 24, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 25500 times:

I saw this file on Flightlevel350, taken inside a Ryanair 737-200 I think...

Man did they taxi like mad, I think they even had SWA beat by a margin...

Andrea K


25 GEG : Does the weight of the aircraft have an impact on the speed it can taxi at, so would a higher weight lend itself to lower taxi speeds? -Dan
26 Blackbird : So, PhilSquares, some airlines program in a lower threshold into the FOQA so that any speed which violates that restrictin will be logged and reported
27 Blackbird : Nobody? Andrea K Pi is approximately equal to 3.1415926535897932384626433897... (I think that's enough to get over the minimum amount of text to type
28 PhilSquares : The airlines can put in any value they desire. If they don't want to monitor taxi speed, they don't have to. It's entirely up to the airline. Remembe
29 Blackbird : So, which airlines program in really low thresholds? I'm guessing here, but American, and Delta would probably be on the list eh? In regards to which
30 PhilSquares : To be honest, those programs and their thresholds are pretty confidential among all the airlines. Even within an airline it's not something the pilot
31 Blackbird : Phil Squares, If it's confidential, and pilots don't know about it... and you're a 747 pilot, how do you know about it? :-P Andrea Kent
32 PhilSquares : Easy, I know people at other airlines who have been "debriefed" about their taxi speeds. For instance at SQ, stabilised approached are a very hot ite
33 Blackbird : How much trouble do you get into if you screw up?
34 Post contains images InnocuousFox : I heard that in Germany, they can go as fast as they want.
35 Wing : I think you are mixing Autobahns with airport taxiways...
36 Motopolitico : Spotting at SDF in the middle of the night, I've noticed aircraft taxiing at a fair clip on the usually inactive diagonal runway. Since I would presum
37 NASOCEANA : I once heard that pilots would purposely slow taxi during contract neogations to more clearly get their points across to upper management. Would this
38 LVTMB : Last year I had to connect through FRA a few times and had time to kill while waiting for my flights. I noticed that not only taxi speed but also towi
39 Boysteve : From personal observation at MAN yes. The PK and EK 777's can take an age to trundle pass the viewing park whereas the B737 and A320 types pass at si
40 Boston92 : I remember an OO flight into LAX on an EM2 where we might have well landed on the taxiway. There were two company (UA) 747, and one company 777 behind
41 757MDE : This happened in Avianca some years ago when they were almost bankrupt and in the C-11. It was called "Operación Tortuga" ("Operation Turtle"). The
42 Blackbird : PhilSquares, When did the Airlines start monitoring taxi-speeds using the FOQA and Flight Recorder? If you can't think of an exact year, can you at le
43 HAWK21M : 15-20 kts. Think about those Tires overheating & wearing out before time. Out here there is one operator that Taxies above 25kts almost 80% of the tim
44 Blackbird : When did the legacy-airlines start installing the FOQA system to monitor taxi-speeds? Andrea K
45 IAHFLYR : Late 1990's I know a number of operators were using some form of FOQA data.....and that data isn't put of for public consumption too often, if it is
46 Mandala499 : Some variables that they use: Approach Criterias: (altitudes are AGL) 1. Descent rates >1000fpm below 1000ft 2. N1 25kts at N1 10kt at N1
47 InnocuousFox : Uh... Geometry 101, the tires rotate the same number of times no matter how quickly you taxi.
48 Post contains images 2H4 : Faster taxiing produces higher tire temperatures. Higher tire temperatures result in increased wear. Mel knows what he's talking about. 2H4
49 HAWK21M : Thanks 2H4. The accumulation of stress in the Tires added by the High temperature build up due to this faster than average taxing reduces tire life.
50 PhilSquares : With the advent of the DFDR airlines started looking at more things. Some airlines even take it to an extreme. There is an airline in Asia that fines
51 HAWK21M : Which one would that be. regds MEL
52 AirframeAS : I think WN takes the award for the quickest taxi time in this country, hands down. They taxi to/from gate as if there was no tomorrow. Not that its a
53 Blackbird : I've been told Ryanair has even Southwest beat. Andrea K
54 Post contains images HAWK21M : I noticed an AI A310 last night.Looked like it was Taxying out after vacating the Runway around 40-60kts.   regds MEL[Edited 2007-06-11 10:00:30]
55 Saab2000 : FOQA programs are easy to monitor. We have one in place at my current carrier. All information is de-identified for anonymity. If the company has a co
56 HAWK21M : I heard Emirates has a very Strict policy of hiring the best.One of our Flight crew got selected recently for the T7s. regds MEL
57 Post contains links hmmmm... : Take a look at this video . At the end he gets up to about 30-40 mph.
58 Boeing77w : Ryanair have a limit of 50kts when back tracking an active runway, 30kts in a straight line on a taxiway, 15kts on the apron and 10kts around corners.
59 CosmicCruiser : When I was at my co. they didn't chk the FDR but your taxi speeds straight, 45 deg turn and 90 deg turn were definitely monitored on line checks and
60 Post contains links 71Zulu : Fast taxi here... http://youtu.be/J-C5leIxSos Expressjet ERJ-145
61 CosmicCruiser : true but excess speeds build up heat which affects brake performance.
62 RussianJet : At STN I've driven parallel to many a taxying aircraft, and on a long taxiway have seen aircraft (738, A319) doing at least 30mph. Never seen them doi
63 NorthStarDC4M : I've always thought regional types seem to taxi faster than heavies... I know I've seen Jazz Dash 8s and/or ACExpress B1900Ds moving much faster than
64 Post contains images CitationJet : Positively true. I agree with that.
65 CitationJet : Notice the spoilers are deployed. He must be going fast.
66 Starlionblue : This may have something to do with idle power. It is frowned upon (and uncomfortable for pax) to ride the brakes so you want to go at idle power or w
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