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737 Type-rating Question  
User currently offlineWestJetForLife From Canada, joined Jun 2005, 814 posts, RR: 1
Posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 9410 times:

Hi, all.

I have a question about type-ratings in the 737 series.

Is it possible for 737-rated pilots to fly all types of the 737 (eg. a pilot can fly both a 737-200 and a 737-700), or are you just strictly considered a 737-200 or 737-700 pilot.

Much thanks in advance,
Nik


I need a drink.
16 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineHighFlyer9790 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 1241 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 9394 times:

There are some aircraft that have a "common" type rating, meaning you are "certified" for both types. In the case of the 737, the NG series are considered a common type, i.e. the 600/700/800/900. The "classic 737s are a separate type rating to the NG series, but are the 100/200 are common and the 300/400/500 are common, if im not mistaken. i am not positive about the classics, but i do know the NG series is one.

other common type ratings:

A318/319/320/321

A330/340 (although training is required to move to the A340)

757/767


highflyer



121
User currently offlineWestJetForLife From Canada, joined Jun 2005, 814 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 9380 times:

Oh, so if WS still had their 737-200s around (pity they retired them last year), then they couldn't use the 737NG pilots to fly the 737-200s?

I read somewhere that a WN 737 pilot flew legs in the 737-300, along with the 737-500 and -700. Is this because the 737-700 cockpit can be designed to have a layout like a 737-300/500 cockpit?

Thanks again,
Nik



I need a drink.
User currently offlineJetlagged From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 2571 posts, RR: 25
Reply 3, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 9367 times:

AFAIK, there is only one 737 type rating. Differences training is all that is required to switch from one version to another.


The glass isn't half empty, or half full, it's twice as big as it needs to be.
User currently offlineHighFlyer9790 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 1241 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 9360 times:

o of course! how could i have mislead myself!  banghead 

the 737 is only ONE type rating, but there is training to transfer to the NG series....



121
User currently offlineWestJetForLife From Canada, joined Jun 2005, 814 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 9317 times:

Quoting Jetlagged (Reply 3):

Thanks, Jetlagged! That really answered my question.

Nik



I need a drink.
User currently offlineMovingtin From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 183 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 9270 times:

Quoting WestJetForLife (Reply 2):
Is this because the 737-700 cockpit can be designed to have a layout like a 737-300/500 cockpit?

The the Primary Flight Display (PFD) can be programed to any configuration an airline wants, so SWA has their displays showing individual instrument displays instead of a combined display.


User currently offlineJetlagged From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 2571 posts, RR: 25
Reply 7, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 9269 times:

Quoting Movingtin (Reply 6):
The the Primary Flight Display (PFD) can be programed to any configuration an airline wants, so SWA has their displays showing individual instrument displays instead of a combined display.

To paraphrase Henry Ford, any configuration you want as long as it's on Boeing's list.  Wink

Southwest opted for this to reduce the differences training required when converting from the Classic to the NG. I personally think the better information display in the PFD format provides is worth the extra training, but then again Southwest has a lot of pilots to be trained and the bean counters rule.



The glass isn't half empty, or half full, it's twice as big as it needs to be.
User currently offlinePilotaydin From Turkey, joined Sep 2004, 2539 posts, RR: 51
Reply 8, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 9214 times:

there are a certain number of differences that need to be covered, such as pack operation on ground, APU inflight bus powerage, and also a couple of new systems onboard the 737NG such as the EEC and the GPS, although we do not use the GPS it is onboard and enables VNAV and LNAV approaches into tricky airports....

aside from that nothing much is different, the engines have autorelight and also have certain protections during startup....difference training is just 8 hours with one checkride at the end...



The only time there is too much fuel onboard, is when you're on fire!
User currently offlineSansVGs From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 190 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 9212 times:

Quoting Jetlagged (Reply 3):
AFAIK, there is only one 737 type rating. Differences training is all that is required to switch from one version to another.

The FAA type just says "737." But is it different in Europe? In the back of Flight International there are many job postings for pilots with specific model designations.

Quoting Jetlagged (Reply 7):

Southwest opted for this to reduce the differences training required when converting from the Classic to the NG. I personally think the better information display in the PFD format provides is worth the extra training, but then again Southwest has a lot of pilots to be trained and the bean counters rule.

Supposedly (because the human brain is an analog instrument) we see trends on the dials better. A needle sweep is said to be easier to comprehend. Do you agree?



Winglets on a Falcon are "over-painting" a great work of art.
User currently offlineJetlagged From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 2571 posts, RR: 25
Reply 10, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days ago) and read 9167 times:

Quoting SansVGs (Reply 9):
Supposedly (because the human brain is an analog instrument) we see trends on the dials better. A needle sweep is said to be easier to comprehend. Do you agree?

Certainly, especially for engine indications. Pointer rate is the cue that is useful, but the ASI and altitude pointers don't actually move that fast (unless things are going very badly). However the PFD speed tape has a trend vector which makes it better than the old style fast/slow doughnut. The PFD/ND format is extremely informative and becomes second nature to read. The "poor relation" on the PFD is the VSI scale, that should be improved somehow.



The glass isn't half empty, or half full, it's twice as big as it needs to be.
User currently offlineAmtrosie From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 274 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 9106 times:

Quoting WestJetForLife (Reply 2):
Oh, so if WS still had their 737-200s around (pity they retired them last year), then they couldn't use the 737NG pilots to fly the 737-200s?

They are typed to fly all models of 737's. Many times their pilots would fly a NG in and take out a classic(300 or 500), or a Jurasic (200). It all was in the cockpit displays, so no cross-training was involved.


User currently offlineLASOctoberB6 From Japan, joined Nov 2006, 2380 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 9067 times:

Quoting Amtrosie (Reply 11):
or a Jurasic

i like that....



[NOT IN SERVICE] {WEStJet}
User currently offlineWestJetForLife From Canada, joined Jun 2005, 814 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 9052 times:

Now, same question, different airplane.

Can you be cross-typed in the 747-200 and 747-400, or do you need separate type-ratings for each?

Nik



I need a drink.
User currently offlineShyFlyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 9005 times:

Quoting WestJetForLife (Reply 13):
Can you be cross-typed in the 747-200 and 747-400

I believe they are separate type ratings.


User currently offlineBAe146QT From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2006, 996 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 8951 times:

Quoting SansVGs (Reply 9):
Supposedly (because the human brain is an analog instrument) we see trends on the dials better. A needle sweep is said to be easier to comprehend. Do you agree?

I absolutely agree with this.

I hope no-one minds if I go off-forum for a minute, but I have inlet temp, transmission oil temp and manifold depression guages on one of my cars. Under the conditions it is driven, it is important that I have that infomation *quickly*. A needle is far better at conveying it than an LCD number.

Geting back on topic, wasn't the engine vibration meter on the 737 redesigned after Kegworth for exactly this reason? I seem to remember that among other things, its visibility at a glance was a causatory factor in that crash.



Todos mis dominós son totalmente pegajosos
User currently offlineJetlagged From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 2571 posts, RR: 25
Reply 16, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 8940 times:

Quoting BAe146QT (Reply 15):
Geting back on topic, wasn't the engine vibration meter on the 737 redesigned after Kegworth for exactly this reason? I seem to remember that among other things, its visibility at a glance was a causatory factor in that crash.

No, it remains as poor as ever. The report criticised the lack of prominence of the vibration indication, but nothing was done. The report also drew attention to the fact that vibration monitoring was now much more accurate than it used to be when high indications were often ignored if everything else looked OK. It stressed that crews should pay much more attention to high vibration indications.



The glass isn't half empty, or half full, it's twice as big as it needs to be.
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