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Being A Pilot, The Downsides?  
User currently offlineDC10Widebody From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 126 posts, RR: 0
Posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

I really wasn't sure where to post this so I hope this is an ok forum, I apologize if it isn't.

Until recently I wasn't entirely sure that becoming a pilot was going to be an option for me. I have recently come into some money and I can afford flight school completely. I am in college right now pursuing a non aviation related field. I have worked for a large corporate bank for four years and I am a pretty stable individual, I am 24, in good shape; no health problems and have no criminal background. I can't think of any reason that would bar me from becoming a commercial airline pilot. I have been reading about all the projections for shortages of pilots around the world etc in the years to come.....it seems like something that I could do. I have a couple of concerns here though, first off I am wondering about the personal implications of being away from home and what it does to your romantic and family relationships. Also, I am responsible now but I have some blemishes on my credit report, I have read books in the past (one book in particular) said that airlines could look at your credit to judge you; as I said everything is good now but could this hurt me? Those are the two things I am thinking about right now, but any other possible pit falls and cautions are greatly appreciated. Or can think of any possible setbacks I need to watch out for, I would really value any input!

Thank you in advance,
-L


Cheers thanks a lot.
67 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinePhilSquares From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Tough question, but I will try to give you my perspective.

I knew from the age of about 4 I wanted to be a pilot. I was planned my education around that desire and was fortunate enough to succeed. I had a AFROTC Scholarship, got my PPL when I was 16. When I graduated from University went to UPT and got my first choice of aircraft to fly. Spent 10 years in the military and loved every day of it. Sadly, my ex-wife didn't and we were divorced just after 3 years of the military. Luckily several years later I met and married a women who was a military brat. I entered commercial aviation about 25 years ago and it's been very good to me.

However, I have three children one who is in his second year at Uni. They've asked me for my opinion on careers and I've told them if I had to do it all over again in today's world I wouldn't. I'd be in a completely different profession.

My own opinion is the profession has continually been eroded over the years. The erosion has happened in many areas, pay, benefits, working conditions, saftey, Captain's authority, the list is endless. It is hard on the families too. Don't plan on having Christmas or any big holidays off, children's birthdays become a thing of the past, especially when you're junior.

When you apply to an airline you grant them the right to look at your credit file, I don't know if they do. It's really irrelavant and I've never heard of a problem with someone not getting hired. They're more concerned about speeding tickets and DWI/DUI issues.

Setbacks face you every day. The biggest one is the medical. One bad exam can ruin your career. I know several people who have had that happen. It's not a great experience.

Just my thoughts, if I were you I'd look elsewhere.


User currently offlineSEPilot From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 6883 posts, RR: 46
Reply 2, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

When I was young I longed to be a pilot, but in my day the only way to the airlines was through the military and the military would not accept anyone for flight training who wore glasses, and I have worn glasses since age 10, even though my corrected vision has always been somewhat better than 20/20. I therefore did not pursue it; but I got my private license in my 30's. PhilSquares brings up some excellent points; consider them carefully, he has been there. As to the credit issues, if you are now responsible and keep that way I'm sure it will not be an issue. It will be a while before you are applying for a job and if you maintain a good record your past will not be held against you. One suggestion: if you ever defaulted on anything and are in a position to make it right now, do so, even if you are not legally required to. It will make you feel better about yourself if nothing else. In any case, good luck!


The problem with making things foolproof is that fools are so doggone ingenious...Dan Keebler
User currently offlinePilotpip From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 3150 posts, RR: 11
Reply 3, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Being at the bottom of the aviation world (CFI) sucks. The pay is terrible, I work very long hours and I have a second job to make ends meet. I plan on moving to a regional in the near future but to be honest the only things that will see improvement are a little bit of time off and I'll finally be able to pay my bills, but that's about it. It's a long road.

I took a year away from flying to see if there was anything else I liked to do and it ultimately came back to the fact that everytime something with wings went over I looked up and wished I was flying that instead of doing whatever I was doing.



DMI
User currently offlineSEPilot From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 6883 posts, RR: 46
Reply 4, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting Pilotpip (Reply 3):
I took a year away from flying to see if there was anything else I liked to do and it ultimately came back to the fact that everytime something with wings went over I looked up and wished I was flying that instead of doing whatever I was doing.

When you come down to it, that is the most important thing. Chances are you'll spend the largest number of hours of your waking life in your chosen profession; if you can do that doing something you love doing you will have the best chance of being happy. That is far more important than money. I am fortunate in that while I would have loved to be a pilot, I did find something else that I love.



The problem with making things foolproof is that fools are so doggone ingenious...Dan Keebler
User currently offlineDeltaGuy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting SEPilot (Reply 2):
if you ever defaulted on anything and are in a position to make it right now, do so, even if you are not legally required to.

Yes and no. Say you defaulted on $200 with a credit card or something 3 yrs ago. Leave it- don't touch it. The longer the account goes without being touched, the better- once 7 yrs comes, it's off. If you pay it off it'll show new activity and the deragatory things are still there.

Just a suggestion. Like they said,

DeltaGuy


User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 6, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 32767 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR



You might be able to have the best of both worlds.

You could pursue a career that you enjoy, and that allows you extra time and money. Then you could purchase an aircraft of your own and go nuts with your new hobby.....traveling, working toward advanced ratings, etc.

You could also pursue a career that allows you to incorporate aviation into your job duties. For example, if you became a consultant, you (or your business) could purchase an aircraft to be used for business-related travel.


2H4





Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offline113312 From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 571 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

It is interesting that you are concerned that you have less than perfect credit and yet you are considering placing all of your economic future in the hands of corporations, most of which, are not financially responsible. For most airline pilots today, the biggest downside to an airline career is economic uncertainty. People used to aspire to the airlines for a top paycheck, travel, prestige, and job security. Most of those reasons are not part of the picture today.

It is most difficult to sustain personal relationships unless they are with partners who truly understand the business. However, some airline situations can provide a nearly normal lifestyle if you choose your residence and company with that in mind (if you even have a choice). But, sacrifices will always be made either in pay ranges or family activity.

Do not be a dreamer. If you like airplanes and like to fly, then an aviation career might be for you so long as you understand all of the trade offs. I get great satisfaction from being a master at my craft. But, over a span of 30 years, I've been employed by 10 companies, had many economic ups and downs, much unemployment time, and have not been able to have a family.

Consider your priorities carefully and be realistic in your expectations.


User currently offlineShyFlyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Also keep in mind that the airlines are not the only game in town. There's air ambulance providers (both fixed and rotary wing) and corporate flying out there.

User currently offlineSEPilot From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 6883 posts, RR: 46
Reply 9, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Actually, the best pilot jobs are probably with the freight companies. I have one friend who flies for FedEx and one who flies for UPS, and both are doing very well and love their jobs.


The problem with making things foolproof is that fools are so doggone ingenious...Dan Keebler
User currently offlineLowrider From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 3220 posts, RR: 10
Reply 10, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 3 days ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting DC10Widebody (Thread starter):
I am in college right now pursuing a non aviation related field.

I would finish that degree, no matter what.

Quoting DC10Widebody (Thread starter):
first off I am wondering about the personal implications of being away from home and what it does to your romantic and family relationships.

They call it AIDS. Aviation Induced Divorce Syndrome. Many have been through it. You significant other needs to have a clear understanding as to what they are getting into. Holidays, birthdays, and anniversaries are when you make them, and have little relation to a calender. If you are going to have a significant other, they need to be fairly independent, trustworthy, and trusting. It also helps if they are not tightly tied to a particular location. I married a great airline wife. They are hard to find. You also have to be comfortable with a relative lack of financial security. If you are going to be fiscally successful, you need a high tolerance for risk, the ability to retain cash, and a higher than normal aversion to debt.

Quoting DC10Widebody (Thread starter):
said that airlines could look at your credit to judge you;

As long as you don't have any recent bankruptcies or currently deliquent accounts, you should be fine.



Proud OOTSK member
User currently offlineZBBYLW From Canada, joined Nov 2006, 1984 posts, RR: 6
Reply 11, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

As far as I am concerned the upsides outweigh the downsides. The downsides are you will be away from your family for alot of the time, you will work for minimum pay, you will work long hours and it is a long steep hill to climb. The upsides are you get to fly (alone this makes it a winner for me), the top end is good with time off, though pay is not that great anymore (in Canada for a captain on AC you are looking at a top end around the $200,000, which has decreased substantially from where it was) but it is still better then many jobs, you can choose where you want your layovers (seniority) and when working an airline job you get the awsome travel benefits. As far as I am concerned the fact that I can go fly an airplane will keep me satisfied... I would rather fly an airplane making 10 bucks an hour for long shifts and never get to see a family, then work at a office job or somewhere where you get paid 35 bucks an hour work flexible hours when you want and get to be home every night, for me its about the flying.

With aviation rember that while the low end is really low the high end is better then alot of other jobs out there so it is a trade off. Either way good luck, and good luck with your flight training.



Keep the shinny side up!
User currently offlineMrocktor From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 1668 posts, RR: 50
Reply 12, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Keep in mind that your career advancement will be based on seniority and politics, not on your skill, ability or work ethic.

User currently offline320tech From Turks and Caicos Islands, joined May 2004, 491 posts, RR: 5
Reply 13, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Being a commercial pilot is kind of like making it in professional sports. For every player who makes it to the NHL/NFL/MLB, etc, there are hundreds or thousands who have the dream but never make it past the minors. That's not to say it can't be satisfying, of course, but $200,000 is something most commercial pilots will never see (unless you add up ten years' paycheques  Smile ).

I never flew commercially, but I have a private licence. Aviation as a hobby can easily take over your life in a way that I've never seen with anything else. The downsides are that you'll spend a ton of money, and 97% of females will think you're, at best, a nerd. But it's still worth it.



The primary function of the design engineer is to make things difficult for the manufacturer and impossible for the AME.
User currently offlinePGNCS From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 2821 posts, RR: 45
Reply 14, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting ZBBYLW (Reply 11):
I would rather fly an airplane making 10 bucks an hour for long shifts and never get to see a family, then work at a office job or somewhere where you get paid 35 bucks an hour work flexible hours when you want and get to be home every night, for me its about the flying.

After looking at you age I believe you are sincere. You will very likely not feel this way when you are 40.

I would never recommend the career. Ever.


User currently offlineZBBYLW From Canada, joined Nov 2006, 1984 posts, RR: 6
Reply 15, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting PGNCS (Reply 14):
After looking at you age I believe you are sincere. You will very likely not feel this way when you are 40.

I sent you a PM but that is how our family is.

Quoting 320tech (Reply 13):
I never flew commercially, but I have a private licence. Aviation as a hobby can easily take over your life in a way that I've never seen with anything else. The downsides are that you'll spend a ton of money, and 97% of females will think you're, at best, a nerd. But it's still worth it.

Aviation can take over, and "fortunately" I have been hit by the bug. I just got home from the airport, and I will be going flying again tomorrow, VERY expensive but hey when I am up in the air, nothing else maters. As far as the females... If you take them flying, show up with the Ray Bans have some fun (rolls etc) there is a decent chance of having a fun "de-brief" or join the MHC (P.S. a 152 is not the best for MHC activities and I am 6'4 I dont know how I pulled it off).

Quoting 320tech (Reply 13):
of course, but $200,000 is something most commercial pilots will never see

From seeing lots of relatives and friends of the family who work for AC as pilots, it is very do able my ex-stepdad is the captain on the 340/330, soon going over to the 77W/77L and let me tell you that figure is defiantly within reach once you get your mainline job.



Keep the shinny side up!
User currently offlinePilotpip From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 3150 posts, RR: 11
Reply 16, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting ZBBYLW (Reply 11):
As far as I am concerned the fact that I can go fly an airplane will keep me satisfied... I would rather fly an airplane making 10 bucks an hour for long shifts and never get to see a family, then work at a office job or somewhere where you get paid 35 bucks an hour work flexible hours when you want and get to be home every night, for me its about the flying.

Please stay out of the industry. Those feelings are the reason that they can get away with paying so little. You won't have much hope of having a family, a life, or being able to see the places you're shuttling people to and from. Oh yeah, you're on the road too, how are you going to afford eating on that $10 an hour?



DMI
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17019 posts, RR: 67
Reply 17, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting ZBBYLW (Reply 11):
I would rather fly an airplane making 10 bucks an hour for long shifts and never get to see a family, then work at a office job or somewhere where you get paid 35 bucks an hour work flexible hours when you want and get to be home every night, for me its about the flying.

And then you turn 30. Not to sound too avuncular from the ripe pedestal of 35 with a wife and two very cute young daughters, but you will probably feel differently in a while.

I'm not a pilot but I have done the 125k miles/year, 200 travel days dance. A rush in some way, but a drag in others.

I recommend you chase your dreams but don't settle for 10 bucks an hour in the long run.  Wink



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineZBBYLW From Canada, joined Nov 2006, 1984 posts, RR: 6
Reply 18, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting Pilotpip (Reply 16):
Please stay out of the industry. Those feelings are the reason that they can get away with paying so little. You won't have much hope of having a family, a life, or being able to see the places you're shuttling people to and from. Oh yeah, you're on the road too, how are you going to afford eating on that $10 an hour?

To be honest I was making a point I would not be at all satisfied with the employer if I was getting paid that low treated like crap etc. I would demand that respect is given to me however what I more or less was mentioning that I would rather work for less in an aviation job then in an office job, obviously I failed to convey that but none-the-less thats what I ment. I will not work for anyone who does not respect me as a professional pilot enough to treat me like how I feel I should be treated, I was just making the comparison.

Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 17):
And then you turn 30. Not to sound too avuncular from the ripe pedestal of 35 with a wife and two very cute young daughters, but you will probably feel differently in a while.

This is how I grew up both my mom and my step-dad where in the industry. To me this is how my life has always been so I do not think that it will be a shock to me. My mother has been an f/a and step-dad a pilot, I have been born and raised with parents that sometimes miss special sporting events, birthdays, holidays etc. However I feel this has benefited me as a person, as I believe that I know do more things for myself, I can take care of anything I could ever want, where other people my age 19-22 ish are still living at home getting home cooked meals etc. But as I was saying for me anyways it is a way of life, I do not see the other side because this is how I have been brought up.



Keep the shinny side up!
User currently offlineEssentialpowr From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 1820 posts, RR: 2
Reply 19, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting Pilotpip (Reply 16):
Please stay out of the industry.

Chalk one up for newbie!

I don't kow how many people that have responded here are career pilots, but I would offer this: if you are more concerned about the lifestyle than the actual career, not only should you not consider the career but you should recognize the fact that you won't end up as an airline pilot. Bumping around in a C172 for $10/hr, just to go to a regional that, at the moment is solid but will always be subcontacted...

You have to be more willing to fly than anything, and I see more "career ambiguity" in you than willingness to be a pilot. That may sound harsh, but it takes a tremendous amount of perserverance to make it to the majors, and that is the only financially feasible (and drastically dwindling) option in this career. Many, many regional pilots will never make it to the majors after a huge investment in time and $$...

Glamorous; it's not.

[Edited 2007-05-11 05:03:12]

User currently offlinePGNCS From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 2821 posts, RR: 45
Reply 20, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting Essentialpowr (Reply 19):
Glamorous; it's not.

 checkmark 


User currently offlineSB From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2006, 216 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting PGNCS (Reply 20):
Glamorous; it's not.

Absolutely. But the view of our planet, or seeing an endless sunset from several thousand feet, and the sense of freedom that comes with lift off is hard to match, and that's why I'm in it. I know I won't have much of a family, or a steady life but I don't care.

People who do care should think really hard before taking the step, there are many other jobs, even in aviation, that are less taxing on ones self and ones family.

S.



"Confirm leave the hold and maintain 320kts?!"
User currently offlinePhilSquares From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting SB (Reply 21):
But the view of our planet, or seeing an endless sunset from several thousand feet, and the sense of freedom that comes with lift off is hard to match, and that's why I'm in it. I know I won't have much of a family, or a steady life but I don't care.

I guess that's what makes people. The smile on my 11 year olds faces when she sees me or when I am hi audience and can watch her performance, or hen I can attend my son's sports tournament and watch games, that's when it's all worth wile for me....or when my 20 year old Son who is in Uni in the UK tries to hit me up for 100GBP. Even that's worth it.

I love watching the sun set while you're going to SYD, there nothing than having your eyes burned out on the arrival to HNL where you get in 7 hours prior to your departure time.

But it's all been good, but for me it's quality of MY life. I've seen too many pilots in the military and in the civilian side who are trapped in their profession. They're not safe, they are not happy. It's just another thing you have to deal with in the cockpit. Give me a junior fist officer, they know their stuff and it's my responsibility to translate that into flying skills.


User currently offlineYWG From Canada, joined Feb 2001, 1146 posts, RR: 2
Reply 23, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting 320tech (Reply 13):
and 97% of females will think you're, at best, a nerd

I beg to differ....

Quoting ZBBYLW (Reply 15):
As far as the females... If you take them flying, show up with the Ray Bans have some fun (rolls etc) there is a decent chance of having a fun "de-brief" or join the MHC (P.S. a 152 is not the best for MHC activities and I am 6'4 I dont know how I pulled it off).

I'm surprised the shift in the C of G didn't bring you down in that little thing  Wink I'm 6' 7", and I dare not even try it in a 172



Contact Winnipeg center now on 134.4, good day.
User currently offlineFLY2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 24, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting 320tech (Reply 13):
and 97% of females will think you're, at best, a nerd.

So true...

Quoting YWG (Reply 23):
I beg to differ....

Quoting ZBBYLW (Reply 15):
As far as the females... If you take them flying, show up with the Ray Bans have some fun (rolls etc) there is a decent chance of having a fun "de-brief" or join the MHC (P.S. a 152 is not the best for MHC activities and I am 6'4 I dont know how I pulled it off).

So he got lucky and ran into the remaining 3%. I always end up meeting the 97% somehow  banghead 


25 ZBBYLW : HAHA yea well it was not too bad... just slide over from the right seat right over to the left seat and basically it was trimmed... lets just say tha
26 SB : I see your point of view PhilSquares, and maybe in 20 years I will have grown weary of the sunsets. Then again I work with some pilots who came out of
27 Post contains images DC10Widebody : Thanks for all the responses guys, it gives me a lot to think about. Still really exciting stuff...it really just makes me smile when I think about it
28 Post contains images FLY2HMO : The thing is, I try not to talk about flying to not sound too nerdy, unless I get asked what I do. Then I'll say I'm a pilot, then they'll be like "O
29 Post contains images Rwy04LGA : Color-blindness prevented me from following my Dads contrails in the USAF. I would've been a LtCol flying C-5s by now. There was a program on the Dis
30 AirWillie6475 : Unless you have an understanding gf or wife, relationships will suck. It helps to get into a relation after you're a pilot and to individuals that lik
31 HAWK21M : Majority of Pilots I've talked to state that the biggest drawback is being away from their loved ones continously. They are a Family when they plan th
32 Post contains images Pilotaydin : i love it, wouldn't change a thing about my job, uniform is nice, the women are nice, the view is nice...and damn did i say the women are nice heaven
33 Post contains images FLY2HMO : OK then I'll have to move to Turkey after I graduate
34 Pihero : I find quite amazing the fact that no one has mentioned that there are a lot of jobs in which one spends a lot of time away from home. Sales people co
35 CosmicCruiser : There's no doubt that once flying is in your blood it never leaves and as I approach that magic age I know everyday that when it's over I will miss m
36 LAXspotter : I too until recently realized that i could pursue a career as a commercial pilot. However some of the drawbacks that scare me most are the unavailabil
37 Jamesbuk : Hey guys and girls, Just a simple question, How much harder/easier is it to get into Freight flying rather than passenger flying? Rgds--James--
38 Post contains images David L : True. I've also seen relationships break down between people who don't travel but work different shifts. They just ended up leading separate lives. M
39 Brettbrett21 : That would actually be a reduction for me!
40 Tom775257 : Flying is fun, however it certainly wasn't worth the effort/money required to become an airline pilot. I won't go into details but along the way there
41 Flyboy80 : Hey, I will say, as others have, the job is cut out for some, and not for others. As far as your personal life goes, you know that doesn't shift a lot
42 ZBBYLW : Well from what I have seen at the airline level is you get full Medical, Dental and Flight Benefits as well as other smaller things but those where t
43 HAWK21M : I've seen a lot of that too in Maintenance also.I met quite a few AMes from US & Europe & 80% were seperated.They call it "AIDS" [Aviation Induced Di
44 ContnlEliteCMH : I'm not a professional pilot and I never will be, so this is an outsider's view, but... ...everything that you've listed above is true for everybody,
45 PGNCS : That is blatantly untrue. While it's true that many professions require travel, as a percentage of the working population, very few travel as frequen
46 Lowrider : Perhaps it is true for some, but I doubt it is true for everyone. Last year I set a personal record of 280 nights away from home. We were so busy at
47 Tom775257 : Lowrider: *Its easily dismissed because you have no idea. It never ceases to amaze me how so many people can pass judgement on what they know so littl
48 Post contains images David L : In my defence, I was just agreeing a point made by someone else (who does know) by offering some views from other professions. I sometimes forget tha
49 Kay : Wow the downsides of aviation are sharply criticized in this thread. Well I work in a multinational organization, and that's another job where family
50 TheGreatChecko : At the feeder airlines, its not necessarily harder right now, it just requires more experience. On this side of the pond, most cargo jobs require Par
51 CosmicCruiser : TheGreatChecko, that's a true statement but let me fine tune it just a bit. Right now no one is getting hired with the min requirements, even if you
52 Pilotaydin : tell me about it, ive never seen such static buildup 30 mins in imc and CBs into TAS 2 nights ago, we had flown for 5 hours already i was tired and i
53 HighFlyer9790 : It is a double-redundecy type set up. no favoritism, corruption, or under the tbale things like what go on sometimes at a 9 to 5 office. no matter ho
54 ContnlEliteCMH : Same old, same old, guys. I don't understand why you think that another professional, especially one who has traveled for a living, cannot easily kno
55 CosmicCruiser : Sounds if you've done well but I must say that it's true until you've been there you don't know. A new hire a year into the job doesn't know. Until y
56 ZKSUJ : If you want to fly properly, get a PPL and fly on weekends. Commercial aviation (especially to those starting out) is not the best lifestyle to have.
57 ZBBYLW : Ill just chime in again to say, if you REALLY want to fly and you know about all the $hit you will face but you still want to do it, can not think of
58 Lowrider : I didn't give you enough credit. You do seem to have a better grasp of the realities than many. I have become used to the anet mentality of, "I would
59 N710PS : I love flying. I truely love it but part of me is kind of depressed. When I was a kid all I wanted to do was fly something that creates contrails and
60 Post contains images Helomech : Hello all, I am an A&P mechanic for a regional airline...I started flying while I was in the military (off-duty training for my private pilot license
61 AA777 : This is a good thread. I've been wondering the same things as the poster has, (DC10Widebody). I am very much in the same boat as him as well. I am 1 y
62 Max Q : 'Awesome travel benefits' are not really interesting to someone who is now flying 95 hours a month and would not care to see an aeroplane on their few
63 N710PS : I would beg to differ but I am the weirdo in my group I would say. I am out and about on my days off. SJU, SXM and GSO in the next month alone
64 Post contains images BoeingOnFinal : I bet if we do do a "being a pilot, the upsides" thread, it would be twice as long as this one But I got to hand it to you, many in here are good at c
65 Whiskeyflyer : all aviation sections are tough. I know I will get my head eaten off for saying this but at least the pilots hours and duty times are regulated and th
66 Post contains images Mirrodie : That was essentially what kept me from pursuing an aviation career. First I considered military, then commercial. But after weighing hte pros and con
67 Lowrider : Most of the evidence I have is anecdotal. Of the cases I know of, I am not sure how many of them are caused directly by the airline lifestyle and how
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