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Aircraft Electrical Systems- Types?  
User currently offlineMissedApproach From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 713 posts, RR: 2
Posted (7 years 3 months 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 4625 times:

Most aircraft I know of operate with either a 110v AC 400Hz electrical system or a 28v DC system. I read in another thread however that the Caravelle & Comet used a112v DC system, at least for engine start. What other electrical systems have been or are used in aviation?


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7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineSilverComet From Mauritius, joined Apr 2007, 85 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (7 years 3 months 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 4620 times:

On the A320 series: 115v AC / 28v DC.

On the ATR: 115v AC / 26v AC / 28v DC / 115/200v ACwild.

ACwild is a network supplied by propeller-driven generators where frequency is not regulated. Used in applications where a fixed frequency is not necessary (probe/window heating, prop anti-ice, HYD pumps, some cabin lights, landing lights and some others I forget).


User currently offline411A From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 1826 posts, RR: 8
Reply 2, posted (7 years 3 months 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 4612 times:

L1011, 115VAC/400 cycles, 26VAC , 28VDC, 5VDC.

F.27, 28VDC, 115VAC/400 cycles (via either static or rotating inverter), 28VAC.

B707, 115VAC/400 cycles, 28VAC, 28VDC.


User currently offlineMissedApproach From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 713 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (7 years 3 months 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 4559 times:

Quoting SilverComet (Reply 1):
ACwild is a network supplied by propeller-driven generators where frequency is not regulated.

I think a lot of wind-driven generators use this as well, converting it to DC, then inverting back to AC with a 60Hz frequency (in North America anyway).

With the 26/28VAC, is this also at 400Hz?



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User currently offlineSilverComet From Mauritius, joined Apr 2007, 85 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (7 years 3 months 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 4549 times:

Quoting MissedApproach (Reply 3):
I think a lot of wind-driven generators use this as well, converting it to DC, then inverting back to AC with a 60Hz frequency (in North America anyway).

In the case of the ATR, it is not converted to DC and back. It remains AC and the frequency fluctuates between 341 and 488 Hz, depending on the propeller speed. Fixed frequency AC is obtained on a seperate network by converting the DC thru static inverters (the engine driven generators deliver only DC).

Quoting MissedApproach (Reply 3):
With the 26/28VAC, is this also at 400Hz?

Yes.


User currently offlineFlynavy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (7 years 3 months 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 4546 times:

F/A-18 Hornet - 115VAC 400Hz, 28VDC.

User currently offlineWrldwndrer From Canada, joined Dec 2006, 22 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (7 years 3 months 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 4443 times:

Always wondered why is 28VDC used in aircraft systems. Anyone know ?

User currently offlineNoWorries From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 539 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (7 years 3 months 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 4399 times:

Quoting Wrldwndrer (Reply 6):
Always wondered why is 28VDC used in aircraft systems. Anyone know ?

I believe it's historical. Any sort of DC system with a rechargeable battery will have two voltages of interest -- the discharge voltage (for example 12V in your car) and a charging voltage (approx 14V in your car). Around the time of WWII (if not earlier) the increasing electrical systems demands prompted airplane designers to opt for a 24V discharge voltage (28V charging). By doubling voltage the wires could carry twice the power without any extra copper. Don't ask me why the auto industry standardized on discharge voltage (12V) and the airplane industry standardized on charging voltage (28V). The 28V bus became a de facto standard perpetuated by the rapid development of avionics during the cold war. Design experience and commonality of parts pushed out into commercial aviation and even aerospace (the Apollo command module had 28V busses; the space shuttle has 28V main busses). Probably won't change anytime soon without a really good reason.


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