Sponsor Message:
Aviation Technical / Operations Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Flight Crew Question  
User currently offlineTHEENGINEER From Germany, joined Mar 2007, 106 posts, RR: 0
Posted (7 years 2 months 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 2968 times:

What happens when one of the pilots gets sick or can't fly for any reason on a layover anywhere far away from their home country. Ex: For any European Airlines' pilot getting sick during a layover in USA . Thank you.

14 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 1, posted (7 years 2 months 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 2955 times:

Discussed here:

RE: Standby Pilots (by SlamClick Jul 19 2007 in Tech Ops)



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlinePilotpip From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 3150 posts, RR: 11
Reply 2, posted (7 years 2 months 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 2941 times:

As a newhire F/O I'm very familiar with being standby.

We have two types of standby. The first is home duty. This one is the better of the two. Basically when we're on standby we have 90 minutes to report to the airport if scheduling calls. If we fly, great. If we don't, we still get paid and can go about our day so long as we can call back within 10 minutes and be at the airport within 90,

The other type, is airport standby. This is where we sit in the airport and wait for something to come up. In the event of this, we go fly the plane. If we don't, it was an exciting 10 hours in the crew lounge and concourse.

Don't have a pilot available in that base? You might have a delay while they get one there.



DMI
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 3, posted (7 years 2 months 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 2927 times:

Quoting Pilotpip (Reply 2):
we sit in the airport and wait for something to come up

What airline does that?

When you arrive on the company premises for any company assigned duty (doesn't even have to involve flying so long as a flight is assigned afterwards) your duty time as defined in Part 121 subparts P, Q, R and S begins. The legality clock is running and you may not ever, for any reason overfly a duty limitation like you can a flight time limitation.



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineFBU 4EVER! From Norway, joined Jan 2001, 998 posts, RR: 7
Reply 4, posted (7 years 2 months 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 2854 times:

I had a situation on my latest EWR-flight some 2 weeks back.We always fly with a 3-man cockpit crew: A Captain,a Co-pilot and a Relief Pilot. During the flight from CPH,my Relief Pilot became queasy but told me he was still fit to continue.Later in the flight,he had to go to the lavatory and throw up.Arriving at the lay-over hotel,we would wait until the morning to see how he felt.If he was still sick,the Co-pilot and I would have to operate the flight as a 2-man crew with no rest periods.This is O.K. as long as the flight is less than 8.5 hrs.Eastbound,it usually is. Now,if the flight had been a 2-man crew flight from the outset and my Co-pilot or I became sick,you've got a problem! We normally have 2 crews laying over at EWR,one from CPH and one from ARN.Some days of the week,we have a second flight from CPH,as well.Crew scheduling would probably look into the possibility of taking a crew member from the latest or earliest departing flight and delay that flight,transferring it's passengers to the remaining flights to the extent possible.A home stand-by pilot would be called out,deadhead from Scandinavia,have the shortest possible rest period and then fly the delayed flight back home.


"Luck and superstition wins all the time"!
User currently offlineDrP From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2005, 280 posts, RR: 4
Reply 5, posted (7 years 2 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 2842 times:

Quoting SlamClick (Reply 3):
What airline does that?

A lot of them, EZY and FR in the UK, amongst others. When an airline has a big base and has the first wave of flights going at around 6/7am (approx 19 flights) then they will usually have at least 1 full crew on standby at the airport just incase of problems. This only works for shorter sectors, obviously, as your Flight Duty Period starts when you report at the airport as you said  Smile



My pony plays the mamba . .
User currently offlineLongHauler From Canada, joined Mar 2004, 5048 posts, RR: 43
Reply 6, posted (7 years 2 months 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 2807 times:

Quoting SlamClick (Reply 3):
What airline does that?

Air Canada also does this for the EMJ and A320 series aircraft.

And yes, your duty day starts when you arrive at Pilot Briefing, and you check into the computer. Also, for credit, minimum guarantee applies ... 4:25 per duty period, 50% of duty time, or actual flying time, whichever is greater.



Never gonna grow up, never gonna slow down .... Barefoot Blue Jean Night
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 7, posted (7 years 2 months 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 2794 times:

Actually when I asked:

Quoting SlamClick (Reply 3):
What airline does that?

...it was addressed to Pilotpip because he flies the US flag.
My question is entirely rooted in the US FARs.



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineLongHauler From Canada, joined Mar 2004, 5048 posts, RR: 43
Reply 8, posted (7 years 2 months 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 2785 times:

Quoting SlamClick (Reply 7):
My question is entirely rooted in the US FARs.

Would they not be similar to CARs, (Canadian Air Regs), in that the clock starts ticking as soon as you arrive at the airport, regardless whether you flew or not?



Never gonna grow up, never gonna slow down .... Barefoot Blue Jean Night
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 9, posted (7 years 2 months 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 2777 times:

Quoting LongHauler (Reply 8):
Would they not be similar to CARs, (Canadian Air Regs), in that the clock starts ticking as soon as you arrive at the airport, regardless whether you flew or not?

Yes. To the best of my knowledge.

I had a friend that took an overnight charter under Part 135 (similar flight/duty rules) When the got to the destination his customer gave him $100 for his expenses there and left him. In that time and place he could have had dinner, hotel room and breakfast and cab fare for about $40-50 but he wanted to pocket it all. He slept in the pilot lounge. In the morning he told someone that he had done so. The guy asked a couple of questions; "where'd you come in from? Where you going next?"

Next thing my friend knows he gets a registered letter from the FAA. They violated him, asserting that being at the airport all night, he was "on duty" and his return flight the next morning was in violation of 135.xxx He was fined $1000 in lieu of a 30 day license suspension.

I've also seen problems arise with mandatory training or meetings interfering with crew duty cycles.



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlinePilotpip From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 3150 posts, RR: 11
Reply 10, posted (7 years 2 months 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 2718 times:

We're on duty. I've yet to sit airport reserve but friends that are scheduled for it rarely actually make it into the crew lounge before the phone rings and they're on a trip. I think it's something we're trying to get removed from our next contract along with getting some sort of commuter clause.

As for what airline, I work for one based in STL that flies 145s. I should be on IOE in the next week or so, just finished LOFT.



DMI
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 11, posted (7 years 2 months 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 2692 times:

Quoting Pilotpip (Reply 10):
I work for one

Congratulations. You will like it a lot better very soon.

They must have the crew staffing pretty well figured out to be able to risk it like that. Worst thing that could happen to crew schedulers would be to make all their spare pilots illegal due to being out of duty time - and they never flew!



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineAlias1024 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 2777 posts, RR: 2
Reply 12, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 2593 times:

Quoting SlamClick (Reply 3):
What airline does that?

Several regional airlines have airport reserve. At mine, it even goes somewhat senior.

Our contract states that crew scheduling is to use an airport reserve when no home reserve is available, or the flight's scheduled departure time does not allow crew scheduling to give a home reserve the requred callout time. Crew scheduling is also to make every effort to have an airport reserve home every night. Only if nobody else is available may crew scheduling put an airport reserve on an overnight. People bid airport reserve because they can be home almost every night, even though they aren't senior enough to hold lines with day trips. Really not such a bad gig if you like sleeping, reading, watching television, drinking free coffee, messing around on your laptop, and chatting with other pilots in the crew room.



It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems with just potatoes.
User currently offlinePilotpip From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 3150 posts, RR: 11
Reply 13, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 2590 times:

It's pretty easy to fly 6 or 7 legs in 10 hours. Even if we sit at the airport for a few hours we can still be used.

That being said, I have a feeling I'll enjoy home reserve more. However we're so short-staffed right now that new hires are only on reserve for a month or two before they can hold a line.



DMI
User currently offlineAlias1024 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 2777 posts, RR: 2
Reply 14, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 2578 times:

Quoting Pilotpip (Reply 13):
It's pretty easy to fly 6 or 7 legs in 10 hours. Even if we sit at the airport for a few hours we can still be used.

Can you be used outside of that 10 hours? At my airline, your trip must start during the airport reserve period, but does not have to finish during it. The duty day can be stretched to a scheduled 14 hour contractual limit.



It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems with just potatoes.
Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic Flight Crew Question
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Tech/Ops related posts only!
  • Not Tech/Ops related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
Most Junoir Base For Flight Crew At Your Airline? posted Tue Jul 24 2007 18:48:41 by Usair320
Embraer 175/190 - Flight Crew Perspective posted Mon May 7 2007 22:27:13 by CFTOA
Exceeding Flight Crew Hours posted Wed Mar 7 2007 01:36:27 by WestJetForLife
Airline Crew question regarding route coverage posted Mon Mar 5 2007 02:57:15 by Futureualpilot
Flight Crew Rotation On 17-hour Flight posted Mon Jan 1 2007 22:34:28 by Jawed
747-400 Flight Deck Question posted Wed Dec 27 2006 16:07:42 by Gkyip
US Cabin Crew Question posted Tue Oct 24 2006 10:22:52 by Icelandair
SFO Special Flight Crew Training posted Sun Apr 16 2006 13:53:30 by Modesto2
How Do ACs Nav Today/flight Crew Test posted Sat Oct 22 2005 14:25:54 by D5DBY
Flight Routing Question (from UK) posted Thu Sep 29 2005 18:08:45 by Gkirk

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format