Sponsor Message:
Aviation Technical / Operations Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Color-blindness Vs. FAA Certification  
User currently offline797 From Venezuela, joined Aug 2005, 1906 posts, RR: 27
Posted (7 years 1 month 3 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 21146 times:

Hello guys,

I need some help from you all on a very important matter.

Happens that I have a certain amount of daltonism or color-blindness. This has not affected me at all throughout my life... Some doctors have told me that is not a high-leveled daltonism.

What I'd like to know is whether this could affect my FAA pilot certification in a near future as I'm going to attend flight school at Embry-Riddle starting january.

Flying has been a dream to me. Actually, my life is based in aviation...

Thanks in advance guys!

Enrique


Flying isn't dangerous. Crashing is what's dangerous!
13 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineJan Mogren From Sweden, joined Dec 2000, 2043 posts, RR: 50
Reply 1, posted (7 years 1 month 3 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 21153 times:

Hi,
you will get better answers if you post your question in TechOps forum.

/JM



AeroPresentation - Airline DVD's filmed in High Definition
User currently offlineAlexEU From Nauru, joined Oct 2007, 1824 posts, RR: 2
Reply 2, posted (7 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 21141 times:

By FAA, you can become a pilot even if you are color-blind. They claim that you only need to ''read'' red, blue and white, but even if you can't there is 'waiver' license.

There are 38 ATPL pilots, 164 commercial and 651 ppl pilots in USA with high color deficiency.

Link for color-blidness (pilots) http://www.leftseat.com/colorvision.htm
Link for medical statistics (pilots) http://www.leftseat.com/sistats.htm


User currently offlineFuturecaptain From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (7 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 21136 times:

When you go in for your medical they will test just how color blind you are. Convince the doctor you can see okay and you'll be fine.

User currently offline797 From Venezuela, joined Aug 2005, 1906 posts, RR: 27
Reply 4, posted (7 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 21125 times:

Quoting AlexEU (Reply 2):
By FAA, you can become a pilot even if you are color-blind. They claim that you only need to ''read'' red, blue and white, but even if you can't there is 'waiver' license.



Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 3):
When you go in for your medical they will test just how color blind you are. Convince the doctor you can see okay and you'll be fine.

Thanks a lot guys, As soon as I thought about the medical test I freaked out. Being color-blind is a funny thing, for others!!!

Cheers



Flying isn't dangerous. Crashing is what's dangerous!
User currently offlineAirframeAS From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 14150 posts, RR: 24
Reply 5, posted (7 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 21102 times:

Not necessarly related to pilots (sorry for sidetracking the thread) but when I was at AS, we had a quite a few folks who couldn't smell a thing. It was pretty dfficult for the airline to actually certify them for respirator use when dealing with chemicals. But they still got certified anyway and they wear one when the manual calls out that a respirator is required.


A Safe Flight Begins With Quality Maintenance On The Ground.
User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6428 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (7 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 21097 times:

Quoting 797 (Reply 4):
Thanks a lot guys, As soon as I thought about the medical test I freaked out. Being color-blind is a funny thing, for others!!!

Cheers

I have a friend who's color blind and a pilot (I'm a pilot, but not color blind  Wink ). All you have to do is be able to demonstrate that you can tell red from green in the context where the FAA thinks it matters the most (i.e. the light guns from the tower). There are multiple test methods that the FAA deems acceptable for this...starting with the color dots test that we all remember from grade school  Smile

Good luck on that, and remember, if one doctor turns you down, there's plenty of others...

By the way, on your initial student pilot class III medical, this is one of the items that they test for.



Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
User currently offlineLearpilot From United States of America, joined May 2001, 814 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (7 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 21046 times:

I'm red/green colorblind and I hold an ATP certificate. I had to do an alternate test at the FSDO (FAA office). They stuck a light gun in the window, sent me outside with an inspector, shot colors at me and asked me what it was. I went 7 for 7. Phew!!!

My advice: if you're wanting to do this as a career, run away and go to med school.  Big grin Just kidding. But seriously, go get your FAA physical/student pilot certificate ASAP to make sure you can pass it. If you don't pass the color vision test, they'll still give you the certificate but with a "not valid for night flight or by color signal contol" limitation. Then you'll need to get started working on getting it removed by taking one of the alternative tests. aviationmedicine.com can help you locate a doctor in your area to get your initial exam, as well as what to do to remove the limitation if you get it like I did.

Good luck.



Heed our warnings or your future will be underpant free!
User currently offlineDCrawley From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 371 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (7 years 1 month 3 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 20996 times:

Quoting 797 (Thread starter):
What I'd like to know is whether this could affect my FAA pilot certification in a near future as I'm going to attend flight school at Embry-Riddle starting january.

It will affect you getting your medical certification. Figure out the color blind issue BEFORE you head off to school. Make sure you can pass one of the many tests the FAA offers to waive the restrictions that will be placed on your medical certificate. Don't start school with a headache like that.

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 3):
When you go in for your medical they will test just how color blind you are. Convince the doctor you can see okay and you'll be fine.

Convince? You better have someone go in before you and memorize the numbers in that case! I am red/green colorblind. I only missed 1 plate and the doc told me I had to take a test called the Farnsworth Lantern (FALANT) test. Passed the test with flying colors (sorry, I couldn't resist!) and got a perfect score, so the doctors office printed me a validation letter and off I went. 1st Class, no restrictions.



"Weather at our destination is 50 degrees with some broken clouds, but they'll try to have them fixed before we arrive."
User currently offlineCopter808 From United States of America, joined Dec 2000, 1132 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (7 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 20964 times:

Quoting DCrawley (Reply 8):
It will affect you getting your medical certification. Figure out the color blind issue BEFORE you head off to school. Make sure you can pass one of the many tests the FAA offers to waive the restrictions that will be placed on your medical certificate.

As others have said, Yes, it will affect you! It need not be a cause for problem though--if you go into it with a heads up!

Be sure to discuss it with your AME BEFORE the physical!!!!! Once you take the physical and it gets reported to the FAA it might require a waiver. It will certainly require further FAA action. Find out what you need to do to get certified with a minimum of FAA involvement.

In summary though, if you can tell red, green, white, you should be able to get certified. You just need to make sure you do it in the most effective manner.

If you belong to AOPA or EAA, consult them. That's what you pay dues for. If you don't belong, this is a good time to think about joining!


User currently offline797 From Venezuela, joined Aug 2005, 1906 posts, RR: 27
Reply 10, posted (7 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 20959 times:

Guys, thanks a lot for your replies. It certainly helps me a lot.

Quoting DCrawley (Reply 8):
Convince? You better have someone go in before you and memorize the numbers in that case! I am red/green colorblind. I only missed 1 plate and the doc told me I had to take a test called the Farnsworth Lantern (FALANT) test. Passed the test with flying colors (sorry, I couldn't resist!) and got a perfect score, so the doctors office printed me a validation letter and off I went. 1st Class, no restrictions.

Hmm I see. So what you all are saying is that I should head to a specialized doctor before going to the medical test?

My appointment is on Nov. 19th in Pompano Beach. I'd better start looking for something near.

Thanks again guys! I really appreciate it.

-E



Flying isn't dangerous. Crashing is what's dangerous!
User currently offlineRyDawg82 From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 868 posts, RR: 8
Reply 11, posted (7 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 20953 times:

An important note as well...While you can obtain a waiver for the pilot side of FAA certification, the FAA is not issuing waivers for prospective air traffic controllers. I know of commercial rated pilots trying to become controllers, and while they can fly passengers around, they are not allowed to control traffic. This is even after passing the various alternate tests, and showing the ability to see all colors used in the course of air traffic systems. Some existing controllers are color blind, however, this applies to the new hires. Its baffling.

-R



You can take the pup out of Alaska, but you can't take the Alaska out of the pup.
User currently offlineJderden777 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 1757 posts, RR: 28
Reply 12, posted (7 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 20917 times:

The very first time I went in for a medical (to get my student pilot certificate) back in 2003 I was stunned that I couldn't pass the color-vision test that was given to my by the doc. I am pretty positive it was the Ishihara plate test, which is supposedly one of the 'hardest' color vision tests. I could see shades in most of the plates but in most I couldn't see the numbers outright. I was given a medical with the "not valid for solo night flight" restriction.

Later I went to a different AME which happened to be an optometrist, and he gave me a different color vision test, which was the Farnsworth Lantern test. No plates here, just the lights and you have to tell what color they are.

It's also possible to get a SODA (Statement of Demonstrated Ability) waiver from the FAA, which I guess is what Learpilot did above. That way you get a letter in writing stating that you can see the light gun signals from the tower and you take that to each and every AME you see, so that you don't have to sit there and go through any of the plate tests again.

I have a mild red/green color blindness, but have been able to point out shades and trace the numbers on the plate tests that I've taken and I've been able to get a 1st class medical.

Not sure how severe your color blindness is, but be sure and check into these options as it will save you a lot of hassle down the road.

jd



"my soul is in the sky" - shakespeare
User currently offline797 From Venezuela, joined Aug 2005, 1906 posts, RR: 27
Reply 13, posted (7 years 1 month 3 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 20858 times:

Guys, I really appreciate your help. Now I'm going to go with well prepared in case my doctor doesn't give me the go for the test.

I had a huge fear that it would be something crucial for my certificate.

Thanks a lot!

Enrique



Flying isn't dangerous. Crashing is what's dangerous!
Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic Color-blindness Vs. FAA Certification
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Tech/Ops related posts only!
  • Not Tech/Ops related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
Atpl Vs Frozen Atpl Vs FAA ATP posted Thu Jul 31 2003 19:43:26 by Gordonsmall
Romanian Aircraft Receives FAA Certification posted Sun Sep 29 2002 20:58:01 by Connector4you
Piston Engine Fadec, Diesel Vs Avgas posted Sat Oct 6 2007 09:13:48 by Baw2198
Operation Costs F100 Vs 737-700 posted Tue Sep 18 2007 16:15:05 by Columba
Boeing 707 Oval Fuselage Vs DC-8 Double-Bubble posted Sun Sep 16 2007 17:16:21 by Blackbird
Wing Flex, 757 Vs A320 posted Fri Sep 14 2007 04:23:12 by N9JIG
Help, Understanding ATC Rules, 7110.65 FAA Order posted Tue Sep 4 2007 20:16:11 by AGANX
767 RR Vs PW/GE Fuel Burn posted Fri Aug 31 2007 17:43:07 by Angelairways
FAA Emergency AD Of 737's posted Mon Aug 27 2007 17:44:38 by Readytotaxi
Airbus Flaps Vs. Boeing Flaps posted Tue Aug 21 2007 21:29:04 by UAL747

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format