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Photo: Props Spinning, Landing Gear Still Blocked  
User currently offlineSashA From Russia, joined May 1999, 861 posts, RR: 0
Posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 3634 times:

Hi everyone,

I noticed this undoubtedly an eye-catching photo in the database with the nice props effect (and I have a thing for propellor-driven aircraft   ).


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Photo © Willem Honders



I wonder what stage of the flight would it be when the engines are running but the landing gear wheels are still blocked (right term: chocked (?) ). Always thought that they were removed prior to engine start due to obvious hazard to the ground staff and even noise... or would it have been just landed and parked and someone already managed to stick them in place?

What are the procedures for this and are there any hard-written rules about when it is safe to approach a powered turboprop aircraft?

P.S. Witnessed this summer, btw, how a Captain (four yellow stripes) was walking about the apron when the An-24RV I flew in stopped at its spot and as soon as engines' power was cut off and blades still spinning he came in under the right wing, dragged the electric cable of the ground supply and plugged into the right engine   ... minutes later an technicial showed up and his face showed an amusement when he saw someone already has done what he was probably about to do...

[Edited 2007-11-09 22:57:00]


An2/24/28,Yak42,Tu154/134,IL18/62/96,B737/757/767,A310/320/319,F100,BAe146,EMB-145,CRJ,A340-600,B747-400,A-330-300,A-340
20 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 1, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 3610 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR

Quoting SashA (Thread starter):
blades still spinning he came in under the right wing, dragged the electric cable of the ground supply and plugged into the right engine

Reminds me of this shot:


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Photo © Dimitris - AirTeamImages



2H4



Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlineT prop From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 1029 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 3608 times:

Quoting SashA (Thread starter):
I wonder what stage of the flight would it be when the engines are running but the landing gear wheels are still blocked (right term: chocked (?) ).

It could be that it's not any stage of flight, maybe it's a maintenance run?


User currently offlineAviopic From Netherlands, joined Mar 2004, 2681 posts, RR: 42
Reply 3, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 3607 times:

This particular night we were not going anywhere as it was just a demo night.


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Photo © Willem Honders
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Photo © Willem Honders



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Photo © Willem Honders
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Photo © Willem Honders



The above are all from the same event.

Even if we do go somewhere the chocks remain in place untill the checklist is completed and the sign to remove them is given by the captain.


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Photo © Willem Honders




The truth lives in one’s mind, it doesn’t really exist
User currently offlineSashA From Russia, joined May 1999, 861 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 3593 times:

Wow, amazing photos!

Thank you for clearing this up.  Smile



An2/24/28,Yak42,Tu154/134,IL18/62/96,B737/757/767,A310/320/319,F100,BAe146,EMB-145,CRJ,A340-600,B747-400,A-330-300,A-340
User currently offlineScooter01 From Norway, joined Nov 2006, 1205 posts, RR: 8
Reply 5, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 3573 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Don't these chocks normally have long ropes attaced to them so that the person pulling them don't have to get so close to the "danger-area"?

Scooter01



"We all have a girl and her name is nostalgia" - Hemingway
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 6, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 3561 times:

Quoting SashA (Thread starter):
Always thought that they were removed prior to engine start due to obvious hazard to the ground staff and even noise.

Looks like a Ground run in progress.

Quoting SashA (Thread starter):
Witnessed this summer, btw, how a Captain (four yellow stripes) was walking about the apron when the An-24RV I flew in stopped at its spot and as soon as engines' power was cut off and blades still spinning he came in under the right wing, dragged the electric cable of the ground supply and plugged into the right engine ... minutes later an technicial showed up and his face showed an amusement when he saw someone already has done what he was probably about to do

You sure the Four striper was not an AME,out here AMEs have 4 stripes  Smile

regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlinePilotboi From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 2366 posts, RR: 9
Reply 7, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 3415 times:

Quoting SashA (Thread starter):
Always thought that they were removed prior to engine start due to obvious hazard to the ground staff and even noise

When we get ready to let our CRJs go, they are parked so they can just turn and taxi out, but need engines running to do that. So we have them start both engines, but the nose wheels remained chocked. Someone waits down there for the "remove chocks" signal. Not exactly the same as giant props spinning out there - but it just gives another example of why chocks may need to be in place while starting engines.


User currently offlineTornado82 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 3409 times:

2H4...

Nice paintjob on that King Air. Sure beats a boring white with _____ stripes scheme.

I notice it says "clean the laser," what are they talking about, a LiDAR platform aircraft?


User currently offlineAviopic From Netherlands, joined Mar 2004, 2681 posts, RR: 42
Reply 9, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 3358 times:

Quoting Scooter01 (Reply 5):
Don't these chocks normally have long ropes attaced to them so that the person pulling them don't have to get so close to the "danger-area"?

No we don't use long ropes that would make things only more dangerous as they might end up in the props.
Personally I never kneel while removing them but that's everybody's own choice, a firm kick with the old boot works better in my opinion.

Quoting SashA (Thread starter):
I flew in stopped at its spot and as soon as engines' power was cut off and blades still spinning he came in under the right wing, dragged the electric cable of the ground supply and plugged into the right engine

We also have to remove the electrical power with the engines running.
Although we can start on battery power alone we never do if we don't have to, just to safe the battery.
The DC2 and 3 electrical power connector is almost in between the spinning props underneath the belly.
It's a bit scary the first time but after a couple of hunderd times it becomes quite normal although you are always very much aware of where you are and what you are doing.

With the Connie and the DC2 there is radio contact between flight and ground crew for the others we use common hand signals.



The truth lives in one’s mind, it doesn’t really exist
User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 10, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 3282 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR

Quoting Tornado82 (Reply 8):
2H4...

Nice paintjob on that King Air. Sure beats a boring white with _____ stripes scheme.

Boy, I know what you mean. The white with _____ stripes scheme is the Eurowhite of general aviation.

I especially like the paint schemes on calibration aircraft. I'm not sure what specific purpose the paint schemes serve, but I like that the paint schemes are (presumably) dictated by technical needs as opposed to aesthetics:


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Photo © Propfreak
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Photo © Steve Williams




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Photo © Borut Smrdelj
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Photo © Den Pascoe




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Photo © Alastair T. Gardiner - WorldAirImages
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Photo © Carlos A. Morillo Doria



Some test aircraft have interesting paint schemes, too. The combination of low-viz grey with glossy, high-vis orange is one:


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Photo © Giovanni Verbeeck
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Photo © Bruno Dellière



Quoting Tornado82 (Reply 8):
I notice it says "clean the laser," what are they talking about, a LiDAR platform aircraft?

That King Air is operated by Flight Precision. They calibrate navaids and approach equipment. I assume the laser to which they're referring is used for this. Maybe ILS calibration?

2H4



Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlineKBFIspotter From United States of America, joined May 2005, 729 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 3172 times:

During ground mx runs on our Dash 8's we will cock the main gear just incase the brakes give. We only do this for low power runs, though.

Quoting Scooter01 (Reply 5):
Don't these chocks normally have long ropes attaced to them so that the person pulling them don't have to get so close to the "danger-area"?

Nope. I have done many leak checks on the engines of both the Dash 8-200 and the -400, and I must say, it is a mind numbing experience being just three feet from a "spinning club of death!" It is just a regular task we perform in our duties as an A&P mechanic.

Kris



Proud to be an A&P!!!
User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29805 posts, RR: 58
Reply 12, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 3163 times:

Quoting Scooter01 (Reply 5):
Don't these chocks normally have long ropes attaced to them so that the person pulling them don't have to get so close to the "danger-area"?

Nope, besides the earlier mentioned FOD hazzard, it is also a tripping hazard.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineFuturecaptain From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 3153 times:

Quoting SashA (Thread starter):
are there any hard-written rules about when it is safe to approach a powered turboprop aircraft?

Don't get too close to the blades.

Signed
One Hand Harry

 Smile


User currently offlineN353SK From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 825 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 3070 times:

It happens more than you'd think. I have personally loaded bags onto a Beechcraft 1900D with both props running - the captain refused to shut down engine #1 because they were already late and thought he was doing me a favor by feathering the props.

User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6411 posts, RR: 3
Reply 15, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 3030 times:

Quoting SashA (Thread starter):
What are the procedures for this and are there any hard-written rules about when it is safe to approach a powered turboprop aircraft?

The procedure would normally be don't approach the aircraft until the props have stopped spinning...it is extremely dangerous to be anywhere near an operating propeller.

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 1):
Reminds me of this shot:

 Wow!

My boss from my lineboy days would have had my hide for that!

Once, I had to dive out of the prop arc. I had just chocked a Beechcraft D-17 Staggerwing, when the owner decided he wanted to be on the classic display ramp. The owner, BTW, was a captain for a major airline. While I was down pulling the chocks (right in the prop arc), I heard the starter turn, and immediately dove underneath the wing. Good thing. The %&*($^ captain almost turned me into lineboy sushi on the ramp! What happened to the word "Clear?"



Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 16, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 3014 times:

Quoting N353SK (Reply 14):

Bad Decision.Errors chances are higher in a risky environment.
regds
MEL

[Edited 2007-11-11 19:47:19]


Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29805 posts, RR: 58
Reply 17, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 2997 times:

Quoting N353SK (Reply 14):
It happens more than you'd think. I have personally loaded bags onto a Beechcraft 1900D with both props running - the captain refused to shut down engine #1 because they were already late and thought he was doing me a favor by feathering the props.

Hot loads on the front pit of the Lockheed Electra where always spooky for me.

Airstarting #3 from the wing connection was also good too.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineScooter01 From Norway, joined Nov 2006, 1205 posts, RR: 8
Reply 18, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days ago) and read 2902 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting Aviopic (Reply 9):
No we don't use long ropes that would make things only more dangerous



Quoting L-188 (Reply 12):
Nope, besides the earlier mentioned FOD hazzard, it is also a tripping hazard.

I still learn something new every day... Who said you can't teach an old dog new tricks?  old 

I remember something like this from my younger days;

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Photo © Fergal Goodman
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Photo © Tim Fawcett



Scooter01



"We all have a girl and her name is nostalgia" - Hemingway
User currently offlineSoon7x7 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 2816 times:

Quoting SashA (Thread starter):

Or simply an intended photo shoot w/ parking brake on...
Big version: Width: 1024 Height: 683 File size: 467kb


[Edited 2007-11-12 22:18:01]

User currently offlinePilotpip From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 3150 posts, RR: 11
Reply 20, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 2735 times:



Quoting SashA (Thread starter):
What are the procedures for this and are there any hard-written rules about when it is safe to approach a powered turboprop aircraft?

Don't walk in the prop arc. Best way to approach is to walk under the wing, that way you're certain you're away from the props.

Are there any pics of a metroliner with a GPU attached? The older ones were between the leading edge and the prop on the nacelle. Your hand is about a foot from it when you pull the plug.



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