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Checklists: Videos And Examples  
User currently offlineCoolGuy From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 414 posts, RR: 0
Posted (7 years 1 month 1 week 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 1934 times:

Is there a video that I could view that shows how pilots go through checklist procedures? Also, are there any websites that show actual checklists and manuals that commercial pilots use? I'm asking because I'm trying to make my job more like aviation by creating my own checklists (even though it has nothing to do with aviation!)

Lastly, what do the terms on the right-hand side of a checklist mean. For example, Gear....UP, does that mean that the captain should already have put the gear up from memory and this line is just confirming that fact, or does it mean that the captain should now put the gear up. Would the F/O would state "gear up" and then go for it, or "gear" and everyone knows to put it up at that point. Slight difference.

I'm having fun with my checklist project so far. Some co-workers have claimed that it looks like a menu (all those dots and numbers). It involves banks, etc.

19 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinePilotboi From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 2366 posts, RR: 9
Reply 1, posted (7 years 1 month 1 week 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 1926 times:

For every operation it is different. Each of your scenarios you described could be used, and probably are somewhere in the world. The most common being: someone reads the item and action, then the other person does the action (or checks to make sure it's already done) and reads back the action. But every airline, training facility, and private individual does it differently.

User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31712 posts, RR: 56
Reply 2, posted (7 years 1 month 1 week 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 1902 times:



Quoting CoolGuy (Thread starter):
I'm trying to make my job more like aviation by creating my own checklists

Its a Good idea to utilise Aviation principles in daily life.I do it a lot & it works well.

The Term is reffered to as Challenge & Response,either between Flight crews or Between Flight crew & Maintenance.
After a call out is made,the action is carried out & then the response is given.

regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineCosmicCruiser From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 2255 posts, RR: 15
Reply 3, posted (7 years 1 month 1 week 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 1891 times:



Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 2):
Its a Good idea to utilise Aviation principles in daily life.I do it a lot & it works well.

The best way to incorperate "aviation principles" to your daily lfe/ at work is one thing...good communication. Never assume and state your ideas, suggestions and commands clear and concise.


User currently offlineJetlagged From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 2577 posts, RR: 25
Reply 4, posted (7 years 1 month 1 week 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 1872 times:

www.smartcockpit.com has some typical checklists online for many aircraft (not Boeings though, they were removed presumably for copyright reasons).

You can find cockpit videos on www.youtube.com which sometimes include checklists. For full coverage you would have to buy one of the ITVV or World Air Routes flightdeck videos. These usually include all the checklists as well as comprehensive systems descriptions. ITVV videos often show the checklists in vision as the calls are made. The Virgin 747-400 video and the Martinair MD-11 video are excellent examples.

Modern in flight checklists tend to be quite short because EFIS allows many items to be checked with a single response.



The glass isn't half empty, or half full, it's twice as big as it needs to be.
User currently onlineAAR90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 3495 posts, RR: 46
Reply 5, posted (7 years 1 month 1 week 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 1864 times:



Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 2):
The Term is reffered to as Challenge & Response,either between Flight crews or Between Flight crew & Maintenance. After a call out is made,the action is carried out & then the response is given.



Quoting CoolGuy (Thread starter):
what do the terms on the right-hand side of a checklist mean.

The "Challenge" is the wording on the left side of a checklist. The "Response" is the wording on the right. In the "Challenge & Response" style, one crewmember will "challenge" the crew for the item and the crewmember designated to perform the task will "respond." This is the standard practice for all normal checklists. For Abnormal or Emergency checklists, the standard practice is known as the "Read & Do" style of checklist. One crewmember reads the entire line item (both challenge and response wording), then the crew performs the required action(s), then one crewmember responds by repeating the response wording. Abnormals are done that way because there is no expectation or requirement for the crew to memorize EVERY abnormal situation.

Quoting CosmicCruiser (Reply 3):
Never assume and state your ideas, suggestions and commands clear and concise.

Aviators are lousy at non-verbal communication --and often not good with verbal communications to non-aviators. Words have meaning and to pilots (controllers, dispatchers, etc.) every word is pretty specific in its meaning. When responding to a checklist challenge, the EXACT WORDS listed in the checklist should be used (as a minimum).



*NO CARRIER* -- A Naval Aviator's worst nightmare!
User currently offlineMandala499 From Indonesia, joined Aug 2001, 6968 posts, RR: 76
Reply 6, posted (7 years 1 month 1 week 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 1864 times:



Quoting CoolGuy (Thread starter):
I'm asking because I'm trying to make my job more like aviation by creating my own checklists (even though it has nothing to do with aviation!)

Proceduralize the operations, or specific tasks, then creating a checklist for it will be much easier and less haphazard.

A few years back I had to create SOP for a special mission flight ops for the mission specialists, and for checklists on the ground, had to add "Inform Mission Specialist for XXX checklist", then continue their checklist after the added checklist at the back seat is complete. Several other items etc. With good planning then, it took three tries to get it right.

Heck, we were checklist mad, we got checklists for even starting up your car when on company duty! LOL... and logs etc (since we reimburse car expenses on a per kilometer basis)...

One thing that needs quite an explaining is which is a "read and do" checklist (eg: cockpit preparation or mission startup) and which is a "do and read" checklist (after take off checklist... we got almost no do-and-read checklist for the mission specialist as it was totally sequential and long).

Mandala499



When losing situational awareness, pray Cumulus Granitus isn't nearby !
User currently offlineJetlagged From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 2577 posts, RR: 25
Reply 7, posted (7 years 1 month 1 week 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 1854 times:

Flows and checklists are widely used outside aviation. For example, any company using an ISO 9000 approved quality system must establish procedures for each task and often these are accompanied by checklists.

Before creating a checklist you must define the procedure. A good method is to draw a flow chart of what must be done in what order, with all possible branches and decisions included.



The glass isn't half empty, or half full, it's twice as big as it needs to be.
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31712 posts, RR: 56
Reply 8, posted (7 years 1 month 1 week 15 hours ago) and read 1790 times:



Quoting CosmicCruiser (Reply 3):
The best way to incorperate "aviation principles" to your daily lfe/ at work is one thing...good communication. Never assume and state your ideas, suggestions and commands clear and concise.

http://www.greyowl.com/articles/index.html

Excellent Articles.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineFr8Mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5658 posts, RR: 15
Reply 9, posted (7 years 1 month 1 week 12 hours ago) and read 1762 times:

Checklists are beautiful things, as long as they are used. In my world, line maintenance, I run into quite a few guys who don't use the checklists because:

"I don't need it"
"We're just running at idle"
"It's too complicated"
"It doesn't really pertain to maintenance"

On the rare occasion that I'm on board for an engine run or if I'm checking someone out, I insist on checklists.

One of the things that impresses me, is when I'm observing 2 extremely competent and experienced mechanics prepare to run and/or taxi. They'll take their seats. They'll spend a minute or 2 getting the panels set and then hit the checklist. Bang, bang, bang...challenge/response.

The only time they slow down or stumble is when they get to the briefs. This is something that is relatively new (6 or 7 years old) to our organization and some guys are having problems articulating the information that needs to be passed, at least in a formal format (Normal, abnormal, emergency).



When seconds count...the police are minutes away.
User currently offlineCoolGuy From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 414 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (7 years 1 month 1 week 11 hours ago) and read 1748 times:

So does challenge and response mean that only the left-hand side is called out. If so, then how does the other person know what to do? For instance, in my original post, "Gear....UP" how would the captain know gear should be up as opposed to say, remaining down.

User currently offlineJetlagged From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 2577 posts, RR: 25
Reply 11, posted (7 years 1 month 1 week 8 hours ago) and read 1730 times:



Quoting CoolGuy (Reply 10):
So does challenge and response mean that only the left-hand side is called out. If so, then how does the other person know what to do? For instance, in my original post, "Gear....UP" how would the captain know gear should be up as opposed to say, remaining down.

One crewmember will read the list the other, or both of them will respond. So the whole panel is checked, not just the "other side".

Normally a checklist is run after the actions have been completed. The pilot flying and pilot not flying have their own procedures to follow (known as "flows"). Once the flows are complete and at the appropriate time the checklist is called for to verify everything is in the correct state. In your example of the gear, the challenge might be simply "Landing Gear?" and the response "Up, lights out". (The gear will already be up at this point.) Obviously the wording depends on the aircraft type involved.

If the Captain doesn't know that the gear should be up in the after takeoff checklist, for example, maybe he needs to try a different career.  Wink

Quoting AAR90 (Reply 5):
The "Challenge" is the wording on the left side of a checklist. The "Response" is the wording on the right. In the "Challenge & Response" style, one crewmember will "challenge" the crew for the item and the crewmember designated to perform the task will "respond." This is the standard practice for all normal checklists. For Abnormal or Emergency checklists, the standard practice is known as the "Read & Do" style of checklist. One crewmember reads the entire line item (both challenge and response wording), then the crew performs the required action(s), then one crewmember responds by repeating the response wording. Abnormals are done that way because there is no expectation or requirement for the crew to memorize EVERY abnormal situation.

This is a very good description of what goes on. So in general, normal checklists are not "read and do". No actions are done while the list is read, just a check of what has already been done.



The glass isn't half empty, or half full, it's twice as big as it needs to be.
User currently offlineFr8mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5658 posts, RR: 15
Reply 12, posted (7 years 1 month 1 week 8 hours ago) and read 1725 times:



Quoting CoolGuy (Reply 10):
does challenge and response mean that only the left-hand side is called out. If so, then how does the other person know what to do? For instance, in my original post, "Gear....UP" how would the captain know gear should be up as opposed to say, remaining down.

Checklists vary from company to company. For example, everytime I've flown jumpseat, the pilot flying (PF) called for gear up, and the pilot not flying (PNF) placed the gear handle up. When the appropriate checklist is run, I seem to recall that it is always the captain challenging "gear", with the FO responding "up" or "handle up, no lights" or something such.

As for our ground operations including flight crew ground duties. Each part of the several checklists has a notation as to who should be reading it and who should respond.



When seconds count...the police are minutes away.
User currently offlineMissedApproach From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 713 posts, RR: 2
Reply 13, posted (7 years 1 month 1 week 5 hours ago) and read 1704 times:

If you're willing to part with some money, you can try http://www.worldairroutes.com/


Can you hear me now?
User currently onlineAAR90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 3495 posts, RR: 46
Reply 14, posted (7 years 1 month 1 week 4 hours ago) and read 1685 times:



Quoting CoolGuy (Reply 10):
If so, then how does the other person know what to do?

That's what TRAINING is for. The "checklist" you see/hear is only the actual words being used to "challenge" and "reply" (or Read & Do) to ensure the item is completed. The EXPANDED checklist (found in operating manuals) explains ALL of the (minimum) actions to be accomplished PRIOR to responding with the proper reply.

Quoting CoolGuy (Reply 10):
For instance, in my original post, "Gear....UP" how would the captain know gear should be up as opposed to say, remaining down.

It is impossible for a checklist (any checklist) to cover ALL situations --good reason there should never be a plane without a pilot. Crewmembers need to be adaptable. For example, on my last flight we removed an intoxicated passenger right before closing the door. During taxi-out we were called back to the gate to remove the 12-yr old child she claimed she was traveling with (turned out he was 19 and did not want to get off). AA has no checklist for a "ground-interrupt," so my FO started the After-Landing Taxi checklist (the closest one to our situation). Many items were NOT set per the checklist as we were intending to not shutdown both engines, but rather spend less than a minute at the gate. In your example, if the checklist says: "gear.... up" and the crew decides to leave the gear down, the proper response would be: "gear.... down."  Wink

For illustration purposes, the initial AA 738 "After Takeoff-Climb" checklist has 6 items: Flaps... UP/No Lights; Gear... OFF; Auto Brakes... OFF; A/C & Pressurization... Checked; Anti-Ice... As Required; APU... As Required. The Expanded Checklist for those same items is two full pages in length include: the above listed checklist items with description of actions (and by whom) to be performed and when; specific verbal "call-outs"; specific times when other action should be taken (not listed on the "checklist"); 2/3 of a page explanation on Use of Center Fuel Pumps; 1/4 page on Flap Retraction Schedule; 1/4 page Chart on Flap Retraction Speed Schedule; 3 paragraphs on Flap Maneuver Speeds; a Flap Maneuver Speed Schedule (chart); and another two pages on Climb Thrust (reduced power, constraints, performance, etc.). And that's just the INITIAL climb phase of flight. And people wonder why it takes two weeks of simulator training to transition to a new airplane?

In short, think of a Challenge/Response checklist as a standardize listing of things you want to verify have already been accomplished (read AFTER doing) while a Read/Do checklist is a standardized list of things you want to get done properly (read BEFORE doing).



*NO CARRIER* -- A Naval Aviator's worst nightmare!
User currently offlineGRZ-AIR From Austria, joined Apr 2001, 574 posts, RR: 4
Reply 15, posted (7 years 4 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1549 times:

To elaborate on flows a little bit:

For ground operation (e.g.: Engine Start, Taxiing etc..) the items to be performed can be divided between left and right pilot. (In our operation, the captain being the left pilot always steers the plane while taxiing, so the first officer as the right pilot has his own specific duties during busy operational phases).

Example:

Captain (Left Pilot, LP) orders "Before Engine Start Checklist"

Then the Captain and the F/O (Right Pilot, RP) will perform their flow items (e.g. Ignition, Power, Doors). Then the RP will take the checklist and challenge (by reading out) the LP or both pilots (BP) - e.g.:

RP: Anti Collision Light LP: RED
RP: Mobile Phones BP: OFF, OFF
RP: Doors LP: Closed/Closed


During Taxi, when the Captain is busy steering, he will order the appropriate "Taxi Checklist", and only the RP will perform a flow followed by reading out loud the checklist to himself, making sure all items are set correctly - e.g.:

Flow: Weather Radar, Fuel Pumps etc..

Checklist:

RP: Weather Radar RP: ON
RP: Fuel Pumps RP: ON


At take off.. the Pilot nonflying will call out V1, Rotate, V2. Once the airplane climbs he will call out e.g.: "POSITIVE", and the Pilot flying will order "GEAR UP".

The pilot nonflying will confirm by "GEAR MOVING" (as an example).

The same applies for flaps and climb thrust.

Pilot flying orders, pilot non flying confirms with standard wording.

Then the climb or after take off check will be ordered by the Pilot flying, to make sure everything is how it should be - e.g.:

PF: "Climb Check"

PNF: Gear PNF: Up
PNF: Flaps PNF: Zero
PNF: Fuel Pumps PNF: OFF
and so forth..


On a personal note, I think it is fascinating that you can sit together in a flight deck with someone you have never seen or flown with before and the working atmosphere feels like you have known the person for years.. amazing what SOP's can do.

regds,
J.



When I joined A.net it was still free, haha ;).
User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8956 posts, RR: 60
Reply 16, posted (7 years 4 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1546 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR



Quoting CoolGuy (Thread starter):
Also, are there any websites that show actual checklists and manuals that commercial pilots use?

Here's an example of a rather thorough checklist for a Cessna 172. Not a commercial airplane, but the layout was intended to prepare trainees for the airlines:





2H4



Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlineFLY2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (7 years 4 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 1517 times:



Quoting 2H4 (Reply 16):
Here's an example of a rather thorough checklist for a Cessna 172.

Oh god, I regret reading that, now I probably messed up my flows  hypnotized  lol

By the way, where did you get that one from?

Here's ours: http://flight.pr.erau.edu/docs/ac/NAV_III_CHECKLIST_REV_1.pdf

Interesting to compare them, so different, yet so similar  Wink


User currently offlineCosmicCruiser From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 2255 posts, RR: 15
Reply 18, posted (7 years 4 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 1512 times:

That's longer than our MD-11 chk list!!  eyepopping 

User currently offlineFLY2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (7 years 4 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 1507 times:

Quoting CosmicCruiser (Reply 18):
That's longer than our MD-11 chk list!!

What!?!? No way!   faint 

Well, I guess that just makes it easier for me when I get to fly the "big" jets 

My school just revised those checklists this year. They are supposedly made to be as similar to those used on airlines as possible. Also, they are really big on memorizing flows, very little of our checklist is read-do. Also notice how we don't have a take-off or engine start/prime checklist.

My only complaint is that the G1000 makes it rather boring, all you do is check, check, check and uhm, check again.

[Edited 2007-11-27 19:46:12]

[Edited 2007-11-27 19:47:27]

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