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Any Simulator Technicians?  
User currently offlineFlynavy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (7 years 4 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 1862 times:

Anyone here at 'liners a Simulator Technician?

I work at Delta myself.

11 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineMQTmxguy From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 197 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (7 years 4 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 1861 times:

Which shop? My Dad used to be a sim tech for DL.


Well at least we can all take comfort in the fact that NW will never retire their DC-9s
User currently offlineFlynavy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (7 years 4 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 1860 times:

MQTmxguy, check your PMs.

User currently offlineJetlagged From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 2577 posts, RR: 25
Reply 3, posted (7 years 3 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 1835 times:

I'd imagine there are quite a few sim techs whiling away long night shifts reading/posting in this forum. It's hard to work around simulators and not get interested in airliner tech/ops. I'm not a sim tech, but I am a simulator engineer.


The glass isn't half empty, or half full, it's twice as big as it needs to be.
User currently offlineFlynavy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (7 years 3 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 1826 times:

Exactly - which is why started this thread.  Smile

User currently offlineMissedApproach From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 713 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (7 years 3 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 1821 times:

I work on simulators, but they're gunnery simulators, not flight sims. Typically our systems might run 3 or 4 computers in a rack, each specializing in a particular task & communicating on a LAN. The OS is usually commercial to keep costs down, older systems using DOS or an older Windows, sometimes Unix.
I was working on something in Trenton a few years ago & I took the opportunity to visit the guys running the CAE Herc simulator there. They run a proprietary program on C+ I think, but the big difference is in the video processing power. There are two rows of racks that mount video cards. They aren't full of cards (upgraded?), but there's still a lot of computing going on in there. There is an isolated anti-static floor, & cooled air flows underneath it & up through the racks, cooling the video cards. There is another seperate room with the hydraulic pump for the motion system & a power conditioner which isolates the system from the commercial electrical grid & provides clean voltages.
Although our simulators get more complex with each generation, it was very interesting to compare them to the pinnacle of simulation technology.

http://www.cae.com/www2004/Products_and_Services/index.shtml



Can you hear me now?
User currently offlineYYZatcboy From Canada, joined Apr 2005, 1091 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (7 years 3 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 1705 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
CUSTOMER SERVICE & SUPPORT

I work (seasonal) on a Sim Ride... if that counts  Smile (same base, diff cabin.)


DHC1/3/4 MD11/88 L1011 A319/20/21/30 B727 735/6/7/8/9 762/3 E175/90 CRJ/700/705 CC150. J/S DH8D 736/7/8
User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8956 posts, RR: 60
Reply 7, posted (7 years 3 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 1702 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR

Out of curiosity, how damaging would it be to take a full-motion level D sim, turn crash inhibit off, go inverted, and auger the airplane straight down into the ground at, say, about 300 knots?

2H4



Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlinePilotpip From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 3152 posts, RR: 10
Reply 8, posted (7 years 3 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 1695 times:



Quoting 2H4 (Reply 7):
Out of curiosity, how damaging would it be to take a full-motion level D sim, turn crash inhibit off, go inverted, and auger the airplane straight down into the ground at, say, about 300 knots?

2H4

The sim flakes out, and shuts itself down.

My sim instructor decided to teach me the importance of having my hand on the yoke down low by giving me an aileron runaway. Sim jerked hard to the right, screens went red, and we droped as the motion system went offline.



DMI
User currently offlineFlynavy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (7 years 3 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 1667 times:



Quoting 2H4 (Reply 7):
Out of curiosity, how damaging would it be to take a full-motion level D sim, turn crash inhibit off, go inverted, and auger the airplane straight down into the ground at, say, about 300 knots?

You can also "turn off" crashes. In this instance you would simply "bump" off the ground at 300 knots.  Smile


User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8956 posts, RR: 60
Reply 10, posted (7 years 3 weeks 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 1644 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR



Quoting Flynavy (Reply 9):
You can also "turn off" crashes. In this instance you would simply "bump" off the ground at 300 knots.

I can confirm that with crash inhibit off, the resulting jolt is of such strength that it produces a very long moment of silence among the flight crew while they contemplate the potential repair bill.

2H4



Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlineJetlagged From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 2577 posts, RR: 25
Reply 11, posted (7 years 3 weeks 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 1620 times:

It's hard to actually break anything on a modern sim. Software motion limits keep accelerations to a safe level. Older sims with glass mirrors in the visual system are a little more fragile. Forget seven years bad luck, breaking those is very expensive.  Wink

Turning crash inhibit ON is a dangerous thing to do as the sim could get into an unknown condition after a crash. Unpleasant on motion. On some simulators crash inhibit ON also tones down the motion response for safety. The only proper use for crash inhibit is if the instructor has inserted a gear collapse malfunction and doesn't want the sim to freeze as soon as the aircraft touches down (gear not down and locked crash). On sims where an inflight crash (excessive g, etc) also causes freeze it can be useful to inhibit this on certain training exercises.



The glass isn't half empty, or half full, it's twice as big as it needs to be.
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