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Ford Truck VS C123  
User currently offline1PHXramper From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 18 posts, RR: 0
Posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 2366 times:

I was wondering how many people have seen the Ford commercial that has a Ford truck stopping a Fairchild C123 Provider. In the bottom right corner of the screen it says actual braking demo.The commercial show the truck trying to stop the plane twice before the plane is stopped. The pilot of the plane either has the plane in idle or is depressing the brake to give the illusion that the truck is stoppin the plane. If someone can find a link to the video it would help show what i'm talking about
I think Ford is smoking something when they say that a truck can stop a plane


I think this is the right spot to post this

8 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineXT6Wagon From United States of America, joined Feb 2007, 3394 posts, RR: 4
Reply 1, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 2339 times:



Quoting 1PHXramper (Thread starter):
The commercial show the truck trying to stop the plane twice before the plane is stopped

Are you talking about the ABS going off?

Or it getting the chain properly tensioned?

Quoting 1PHXramper (Thread starter):
The pilot of the plane either has the plane in idle

Of course they have the engines not producing thrust.... they are trying to land the plane.


User currently offlineTdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 80
Reply 2, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 2272 times:



Quoting 1PHXramper (Thread starter):
I think Ford is smoking something when they say that a truck can stop a plane

A C123 has 5,000-6,000 lbs of thrust when it's going full bore. A big pickup could easily produce that much towing force.

Tom.


User currently offlineXT6Wagon From United States of America, joined Feb 2007, 3394 posts, RR: 4
Reply 3, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 2231 times:



Quoting Tdscanuck (Reply 2):
A C123 has 5,000-6,000 lbs of thrust when it's going full bore. A big pickup could easily produce that much towing force.

Its even easier than that. They are trying to stop it from a low speed landing run on a long runway. So Basicly all they have to do is dump the momentum of the plane. I'd assume they put a couple thousand pounds of ballast in the truck to get the rear brakes working and the rear tires with traction. Then its just about taking a mile or so to stop a unloaded plane.


User currently offlineAirfoilsguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 2197 times:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=W2HWMnkI_uA

User currently offlineHangarRat From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 633 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 2109 times:

From the footage in that mini-doc about making the commercial, it looks as if it was a pretty short stopping distance. I can't imagine that the roll out for an unloaded c-123 is all that long. Wasn't it designed for unprepared fields?

The other aspect of this stunt is that they didn't have to use the truck again. The brakes were probably trashed after this.



Spell check is a false dog
User currently offlineXT6Wagon From United States of America, joined Feb 2007, 3394 posts, RR: 4
Reply 6, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 2105 times:



Quoting HangarRat (Reply 5):
The other aspect of this stunt is that they didn't have to use the truck again. The brakes were probably trashed after this.

Nah, modern braking systems don't get trashed from single use.


User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 7, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 2087 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR



Quoting HangarRat (Reply 5):
I can't imagine that the roll out for an unloaded c-123 is all that long. Wasn't it designed for unprepared fields?

Typical speed in the C-123 at touchdown is about 90 knots. Allow some time for the truck to roll out and take up the slack of the chain, and it might be down to around 80 knots. That's about 92 mph.

I'd be a lot more impressed to watch the truck haul it's heaviest rated load down a long mountain road out in the Rockies. I suspect 30 or 40 miles of steep descents and switchbacks would be much more of a workout for the brakes than bringing a 30,000 pound plane to a stop in hundreds of feet on a runway that may or may not be level.  Wink

2H4



Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlineXT6Wagon From United States of America, joined Feb 2007, 3394 posts, RR: 4
Reply 8, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 1976 times:



Quoting 2H4 (Reply 7):
I'd be a lot more impressed to watch the truck haul it's heaviest rated load down a long mountain road out in the Rockies

Its no big deal with the F150, I've taken mine across the Rockies with a trailer, combined load 1000lbs over the max listed weight... not once, but twice. From NM to OR so you cross the LOOONG way. Only problem is making sure you are going slow enough when you crest since my trailer brakes were weak enough to make using the brakes in corners somewhat stupid and unsafe. In a straight line the truck was fine pulling off speed even loaded that heavy, mile after mile, trip after trip. If I had a better trailer, wouldn't even need to limit cresting speeds other than just smarter to do so.

helps that the rear brakes are HUGE and the ABS system is used to keep the brake balance correct for loaded vs unloaded.... So the total braking capacity is vastly superior to older trucks just in the raw ability to store heat. Then add in modern venting designs for the rotors, and its virtually idiot proof.


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