Sponsor Message:
Aviation Technical / Operations Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
What Is The "K"?  
User currently offline727LOVER From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 11336 times:

I'm used to:

MIA
SFO
LAX


but lots of times I see people refer to them as:

KMIA
KSFO
KLAX


So what is the K?

74 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineGigneil From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 11333 times:

Those are ICAO rather than IATA airport codes.

NS


User currently offlineMark5388916 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 11336 times:

K starts all ICAO Airport codes in the Continental USA. In the Pacific they start with P like PHNL is Honolulu. In the US, most IATA codes (MIA, CDG, ONT, RIV) are the same with a K or a P added yet there are some exceptions (PHOG is OGG) In Europe, some codes are VERY different. CDG=LFPG LHR=EGLL. Hope this helps.

Mark


User currently offlineA318 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 11313 times:



Quoting Mark5388916 (Reply 2):
In the US, most IATA codes (MIA, CDG, ONT, RIV)

CDG in the United States? I'm sure you meant to say Europe!


User currently offlineRampart From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 11324 times:

K is the ICAO prefix designating a US airport. C is Canada (CYUL), Z China (ZSHA), etc.

-Rampart


User currently offlineKaitak744 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 11324 times:

All airports have two codes:

IATA codes: 3 letters (ex: LAX)
ICAO codes: 4 letters (ex: KLAX)

Most airports have different IATA and ICAO codes. For example, Heathrow - IATA: LHR and ICAO: EGLL. However, in the U.S., the ICAO codes simply have a K in front of the IATA codes. They just didn't want to come up with new codes I guess.


User currently offlineStar_world From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 11254 times:



Quoting Rampart (Reply 4):
K is the ICAO prefix designating a US airport. C is Canada (CYUL), Z China (ZSHA), etc.

There are actually only a handful of countries where you can just stick an extra letter onto the IATA code to get the ICAO code. Almost every country has different 4-letter airport codes.


User currently offlineLAXintl From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 11200 times:



Quoting Kaitak744 (Reply 5):
All airports have two codes:

Not all.

There are plnety of airports without IATA codes but with ICAO codes. Then to make things even more complicated there are FAA 3-4 letter or alpha-numeric codes applicable to small airfields or heliports that are not assigned IATA or ICAO codes.


User currently offlineSirOmega From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 11125 times:

Here is an odd one for ya:

IATA: HSH
ICAO: KHND

Henderson Executive, near LAS.


User currently offlineKELPkid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 11032 times:

Quoting Kaitak744 (Reply 5):
All airports have two codes:

IATA codes: 3 letters (ex: LAX)
ICAO codes: 4 letters (ex: KLAX)

Better add the FAA LID (location identifier-3 characters, can be letters or numbers) to that for US airports. Sometimes, all three can be different  

Quoting Kaitak744 (Reply 5):
Most airports have different IATA and ICAO codes. For example, Heathrow - IATA: LHR and ICAO: EGLL. However, in the U.S., the ICAO codes simply have a K in front of the IATA codes. They just didn't want to come up with new codes I guess

Here in the 'states, the vast majority of fields don't have IATA codes. Tell me, what's the IATA for 5T6 or 7S3...   However, all big fields where airliners would normally land have IATA identifiers... ICAO identifiers usually go to the bigger fields, too. Your little small GA fields where the identifier is partially numeric won't have an ICAO identifier.

P.S. The ICAO identifier is the key to decoding my screen name  Wink

[Edited 2008-01-13 22:29:14]

User currently offlineAloha73G From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 10954 times:



Quoting KELPkid (Reply 10):
P.S. The ICAO identifier is the key to decoding my screen name

You mean you don't like kelp??  Wink

I always thought you were a lover of seals and sea lions.

-Aloha!


User currently offlineCOSPN From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 10918 times:

K CONUS
P Pacific HNL ANC GUM
RJ Japan
RP Philippines
RO Okinawa
RK South Korea
WA Indonesia


User currently offlineLASOctoberB6 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 10905 times:



Quoting SirOmega (Reply 9):
Here is an odd one for ya:

IATA: HSH
ICAO: KHND

Henderson Executive, near LAS.

Seriously, I never knew that and always thought it was KHND or HND... HSH...hmm... Thanks SO.


User currently offlineSpeedyGonzales From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 10838 times:

See here for more details:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interna...Aviation_Organization_airport_code


User currently offlineRyu2 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 10765 times:

Did West and East Germany have different ICAO prefixes, or did they share the ED prefix before reunification?

User currently offlineJgarrido From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 10692 times:

Usually the letter of a ICAO identifer is a broad region while the second is further subregion. For example Hawaii's airports are all PH. P for pacific, H for hawaii. e.g. PHNL, PHOG, PHTO, PHNG. Guam's International Airport is PGUM. Again P is pacific and now G is for Guam. Andersen AFB is PGUA. Siapan and Rota are part of the Guam "region" so they are PGSN and PGRO respectively.

Of course there are always exceptions even outside the continental US. Sydney is YSSY, yet clear on the other side of the country is YSHK-Shark Bay Airport – Denham, Western Australia


User currently offlineCharlipr From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 10633 times:

St. Agustine, Florida:

IATA: UST
ICAO: KSGJ
FAA: SGJ

Hilton Head, SC:

IATA: HHH
ICAO: KHXD
FAA: HXD


User currently offlineTWFirst From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 10289 times:



Quoting A318 (Reply 3):
CDG in the United States? I'm sure you meant to say Europe!

He probably meant to say CVG.


User currently offlineAsstChiefMark From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 10256 times:

AND... A.net's mouse-over function only recognizes IATA codes.

There are a handful of members that insist on using ICAO codes. I think it's their attempt to screw with peoples' minds or show off their "superior" abilities.


User currently offlineFalcon flyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 10254 times:



Quoting LASOctoberB6 (Reply 12):
Seriously, I never knew that and always thought it was KHND or HND... HSH...hmm... Thanks SO.



Quoting SirOmega (Reply 8):
Here is an odd one for ya:

IATA: HSH
ICAO: KHND

Henderson Executive, near LAS.

Interesting anomaly since HND is recognized for domestic ATC and flight planning. Same thing with Scottsdale, AZ where SDL is used even though the airport codes are shown as KSDL/SCF. Phoenix-Mesa (formerly Williams Gateway) also uses IWA for flight planning and ATC even though the codes are listed as KIWA/AZA.


User currently offlineJBo From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 10218 times:



Quoting SirOmega (Reply 8):
Here is an odd one for ya:



Quoting Falcon flyer (Reply 19):

Interesting anomaly since HND is recognized for domestic ATC and flight planning. Same thing with Scottsdale, AZ where SDL is used even though the airport codes are shown as KSDL/SCF. Phoenix-Mesa (formerly Williams Gateway) also uses IWA for flight planning and ATC even though the codes are listed as KIWA/AZA.

That's because the FAA has their own 3-letter codes they use, which are pretty much the ICAO codes with the K left off, so for U.S. airports, there are really three codes: ICAO, IATA, and FAA Local ID.

Here's another U.S. airport to the "anomaly list":

IATA: MQT
ICAO: KSAW

Sawyer Int'l Airport (former K.I. Sawyer AFB) - Marquette, Michigan


User currently offlineKELPkid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 10108 times:

Here's a question for you fellow pilot folks:

Which ID do you use in your logbook?

When flying domestically, I usually use the FAA LID. However, on the occasions that I've flown into Mexico, I put the ICAO identifier in, basically because I didn't have any other aeronautical data readily available (like the local 3-letter identifier or the IATA code  Wink ). I have been asked by an FAA designated flight examiner "Where the hell is this?" when he ran across those entries in my logbook, and I had to explain...


User currently offlineCubsrule From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 10060 times:



Quoting JBo (Reply 20):
Here's another U.S. airport to the "anomaly list":

Is AUS an anomaly? MCO isn't since they didn't move ORL when took over McCoy AFB, but AUS might be...


User currently offlineKELPkid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 9992 times:



Quoting Cubsrule (Reply 22):
Is AUS an anomaly? MCO isn't since they didn't move ORL when took over McCoy AFB, but AUS might be...

It used to be, I believe it was KBSM until Mueller was finally closed, then they gave it KAUS.


User currently offlineAustinairport From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 24, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 9731 times:



Quoting Mark5388916 (Reply 2):
K starts all ICAO Airport codes in the Continental USA. In the Pacific they start with P like PHNL is Honolulu. In the US, most IATA codes (MIA, CDG, ONT, RIV) are the same with a K or a P added yet there are some exceptions (PHOG is OGG) In Europe, some codes are VERY different. CDG=LFPG LHR=EGLL. Hope this helps.

Mark

applause  Smile


25 AF1624 : Moreover, you can actually translate those ICAO codes, most of the time : - LFPG -- L : Latin Europe -- F : France -- P : Paris -- G : de Gaulles - LP
26 Post contains links Irish251 : Quoting Ryu2 (Reply 14): Did West and East Germany have different ICAO prefixes, or did they share the ED prefix before reunification? No, West German
27 Cubsrule : If L is Latin Europe (which is, for the most part, accurate), what is E? Can't be eastern, as it's really more like northern (EHAM, EGLL, etc.)
28 BWilliams : E is Europe, but it's only for the nothern half or so, as you've noticed. England (EG-), Netherlands (EH-), Norway (EN-), Poland (EP-), etc. Goes as f
29 Post contains images KELPkid : El Paso? Sea Lions? Am I missing something here, or did some seals magically swim 750 miles up the Rio Grande? I didn't even know the Gulf of Mexico
30 Mir : E is Europe, L is Lower Europe (or so I've been told). -Mir
31 Cubsrule : I'll buy that... it sure makes sense (and off the top of my head, the word for Europe starts with E in most European languages; certainly in English
32 DAirbus : L is for "Lower" or Southern Europe and includes not only the countries that border the Mediterranean but also the Balkans, Switzerland, Austria, Czec
33 N68tlcaptain : Arizona has alot of P's P19- Stellar P08-Colidge P13-Globe san carlos P04-Bisbee I know theres more but thats all I can think of
34 EDICHC : Grrr! EGxx is Britain NOT ENGLAND! I get really ratty England is not a sovereign state! My old home Edinburgh has the ICAO code EGPH last I heard it
35 AirEMS : Don't forget that Denver International when it opened was KDIA then got changed to KDEN which was Stapleton's code -Carl
36 Post contains images Argonaut : Although it might be better to use "UK" which includes all four countries ("Britain" strictly only refers to three of them). Don't know why people do
37 BrianDromey : EI is the code for Ireland, so you end up with EINN - SNN EICK - ORK etc, the only place Ive seen ICAO codes used is on the entertainment system onboa
38 Post contains images SJC4Me : So what does the K stand for in the US? Is ICAO an American institution? Maybe we got to keep our IATA+K because of a hometown discount! ... or did IC
39 Post contains images Dufo : ICAO is where you and IATA where your luggage is going
40 Cjbmibe : I've come to accept Great Britain as a compromise. My local commercial is EGAC (BHD) although EGAD is closer for general. Both follow the basis of E/
41 CFMitch56 : Does anyone know what the T meant when those East German airports were ETxx? T in Ost (east) maybe? Or could it just be "we had 26 choices, some were
42 Post contains images Patroni : Wow, I didn't know that Sarkozy would go THAT far Seriously though I second TWFirst's statement:
43 RFields5421 : If you deal with flight planning software - the ICAO codes are normally used. Yes - ICAO codes were initially assigned based upon the radio transmitt
44 Dbo861 : I just noticed this one in my Jepps: ICAO: KIWA FAA: AZA I guess the ICAO for Williams Gateway in Mesa is staying the same, but the FAA got changed. W
45 Cubsrule : IIRC the original plan was to change all of them, and at some point the folks at Williams Gateway decided it was just going to be too complicated.
46 BlueElephant : St. Thomas is always an Interesting one. Some people think it is KSTT but it is actually TIST. I got into an argument with a customs officer about tha
47 AussieItaliano : Probably because the capital city is located in England, and when people over here in the US think of the UK, they think of London. Although I know i
48 Bond007 : Oh, lighten up. Only a few Haggis eating, bagpipe blowing folks, and a couple of sheep farmers who live in towns with rather long place names seem to
49 Baron52ta : Not England but Europa Great Britain
50 Mark5388916 : I wish I could say yes, but no, I was just dumb. Not at all! What is the plan if they DO run out of possible codes before switching to a 4 digit IATA
51 Post contains images N1120A : In some ways, those are easier, because the letters stand for something. That is because they are not going to get an international flight. That is b
52 Post contains images Madviking : Why "Y" was chosen in the first place, I don't know. However I do remember reading that the postal service initially had Canadian cities listed as Y-
53 N1120A : The reasoning is, basically, because Canada felt like being special.
54 RFields5421 : Having an ICAO code is not a requirement for international flight. There are several airports in the US and other nations which receive international
55 Bond007 : Not just "Y", but also "Z", since Canada ICAO is CYxx and CZxx (and CWxx but no IATA W's). Where the IATA can be determined from the last 3 of the Ca
56 N1120A : Let me be a bit more clear about that. Those smaller fields have essentially zero possibility of being included in the navigation for an internationa
57 Post contains links Mir : Plenty of airports with only FAA codes have instrument approaches. http://204.108.4.16/d-tpp/0713/05075V4.PDF http://204.108.4.16/d-tpp/0713/06401V6.
58 Post contains images KELPkid : Not entirely true. I know of one field (5T6, Santa Teresa, New Mexico) which is approved as an airport of entry (well, provided you are willing to gi
59 AF1624 : I stand corrected : L is for Lower Europe, not Latin Europe. What's strange it's that not all ICAO codes mean something. And sometimes they do. Just l
60 SFO777200LR : In the U.S., in order for an airport to receive a "K" followed by a 3 LETTER designator, it must have WX broadcasting capabilities i.e. ATIS, AWOS, AS
61 N1120A : Looking at N51's AirNav page, it seems that the only instrument navaid listed is SBJ at the field.
62 Post contains links RFields5421 : The International Civil Aviation Organization - http://www.icao.int/ - ICAO makes the decisions on standardization. It's the same way with registrait
63 AF1624 : Thanks for a great answer. I think that sums it up really well.
64 Kmh1956 : Ok, so I look up airport activity on FlightAware fro bermuda....the airport is TXKF. I'm pretty sure the KF stands for Kindley Field, which is what it
65 Bond007 : This was exactly what was described in the previous 63 posts. Jimbo
66 Viscount724 : IATA uses both city and airport codes. The airport code (e.g. JFK, LHR, FCO, FRA) usually applies only for one specific airport. Many cities with mor
67 AirframeAS : You mean Williams Air Force Base. I think the OP wanted to know what the letter "K" actually stands for as we all know it has to do with airport code
68 Post contains images Malaysia : maybe Sea Lions eat Kelp? the sea plant
69 GCT64 : In the UK, you do actually regularly see three letter codes being used on boarding cards, flight information displays etc. I think the most obvious i
70 PurpleBox : No - almost all carriers are referred to by a two letter code - however sometimes LH is referred to as DLH (Deutsche Lufthansa) for some unknown reas
71 Bond007 : I guess you didn't read his post! 3-letter carrier codes are used every day worldwide. The problem with the IATA codes for both airport and carrier,
72 Viscount724 : Thanks. I should have clarified that I was referring only to use of the 3-letter codes with respect to reservations/ticketing and schedules.
73 Mir : Your claim, if I read it right, was that small airports without ICAO codes didn't have instrument facilities and couldn't be used for instrument navi
74 Post contains images KELPkid : 26 satellites (and three operational spares) have sure opened up lots of GA fields to the world of instrument flying...and the approaches are easier
Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic What Is The "K"?
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Tech/Ops related posts only!
  • Not Tech/Ops related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
What Is The "N" In N1 Or N2? posted Wed Feb 6 2002 02:54:17 by Norseman
What Is An "aircraft Stick Shaker" posted Wed Jun 29 2005 01:04:06 by ETStar
What Is An "e-enabled" Airline? posted Tue May 4 2004 03:04:59 by Varmit
What About The "turbine Breathe" posted Wed Aug 16 2000 13:09:19 by Gabriel
What Is The Function Of "prop Sync"? posted Thu Aug 25 2005 22:48:17 by ArniePie
What Is The Purpose Of "drooping" Ailerons posted Sun Aug 17 2003 17:56:25 by Olympic A-340
What Is The Deal With "Heavies" posted Tue Dec 4 2001 04:24:49 by Concorde1518
What Is The Significance Of "company Traffic"? posted Fri Jul 6 2001 20:06:11 by Sunken_Lunken
What Is The Angle Of This Plane @ Takeoff posted Thu Dec 13 2007 17:18:27 by SuseJ772
What Is The Cost For Operating? posted Wed Sep 19 2007 19:44:42 by B747forever

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format