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MCO Arrival Runway 35R  
User currently offlineReadytotaxi From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2006, 3338 posts, RR: 2
Posted (6 years 9 months 3 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 3060 times:

On my many trips to Orlando from the UK I have always arrived on 35R, is this a tech reason or just luck of the draw, then have the LONG taxi into terminal and gate 84. Is it a runway favored for B777 and 747?
Thanks


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12 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineSilentJC From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 32 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (6 years 9 months 3 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 3027 times:

I'm no expert, but I assume it generally has to do with what airline you're on, etc. For instance, British Airways and Virgin Atlantic are both stationed in Airside 4. 17L/35R is used for arrivals on that side of the airfield for the most part. I usually fly Delta to MCO and have always flown in on that same runway. I'm sure for logistics reasons it's possible to fly into the 18/36's, but I'd say it's probably rare. However, I have flown out of the other side a couple times... usually a long taxi, but it happens.

User currently offlineReadytotaxi From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2006, 3338 posts, RR: 2
Reply 2, posted (6 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 3013 times:

Yes, that would make sense, thanks for that.


you don't get a second chance to make a first impression!
User currently offlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21798 posts, RR: 55
Reply 3, posted (6 years 9 months 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 3006 times:

I believe MCO generally sorts arrivals between the 18/36s and 17/35s based on where the arrival is coming from. Since you were coming from the east, it would make sense that you'd land on the 17/35s. As for why it would be 35R instead of 17L, that's just luck of the draw with the winds.

-Mir



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User currently offlineCorey07850 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2528 posts, RR: 5
Reply 4, posted (6 years 9 months 3 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 2987 times:



Quoting Mir (Reply 3):
I believe MCO generally sorts arrivals between the 18/36s and 17/35s based on where the arrival is coming from.

It's generally more about where the aircraft is parking then the direction they are arriving from (as the other poster mentioned). Saves a lot of taxi time to taxi clear across the airport.


User currently offlinePilotboi From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 2366 posts, RR: 9
Reply 5, posted (6 years 9 months 2 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 2950 times:



Quoting Corey07850 (Reply 4):
It's generally more about where the aircraft is parking then the direction they are arriving from (as the other poster mentioned). Saves a lot of taxi time to taxi clear across the airport.

That's correct, but they've tried to set it up so that where they are coming from or going ot in the air matches where they are going to on the ground. Generally...airlines with hubs in the west and central US use the western airsides (1 & 3), and airlines with hubs on the east coast, northeast, and also Europe use the eastern airsides (2 & 4). There are some exceptions, for example Bahamas Air is on the west side, go figure.


User currently offlineSPREE34 From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 2258 posts, RR: 9
Reply 6, posted (6 years 9 months 2 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 2858 times:



Quoting Mir (Reply 3):
I believe MCO generally sorts arrivals between the 18/36s and 17/35s based on where the arrival is coming from.



Quoting Corey07850 (Reply 4):
It's generally more about where the aircraft is parking then the direction they are arriving from (as the other poster mentioned). Saves a lot of taxi time to taxi clear across the airport.

Negative. It's about safety and traffic flow.

What Mir has stated above is correct. Aircraft are sequenced to a runway based on the side of the field they arrived from. IF traffic permits, ATC will accommodate request to land on a runway closer to the gates.

Departures are sent out the same way. Depart from the side of the field most convenient to the departure route. As with arrivals, ATC will honor request traffic permitting.



I don't understand everything I don't know about this.
User currently offlineSilentJC From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 32 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (6 years 9 months 2 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 2799 times:



Quoting SPREE34 (Reply 6):
Departures are sent out the same way. Depart from the side of the field most convenient to the departure route. As with arrivals, ATC will honor request traffic permitting.

Again, I'm no expert... but for instance; if you're flying say Delta from Atlanta. As a pilot you know a few things. You know the expected weather at the destination, and you know where you're going to have to park. So wouldn't they plan a route that would pretty much assure you arrive on the correct side of the airfield? I know there are other factors to consider sometimes... but it'd seem to me that in planning the flight, you'd take those sorts of things into account.

Not saying you're wrong... just wondering if that tends to be the case?


User currently offlineSPREE34 From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 2258 posts, RR: 9
Reply 8, posted (6 years 9 months 2 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 2788 times:



Quoting SilentJC (Reply 7):
So wouldn't they plan a route that would pretty much assure you arrive on the correct side of the airfield?

No. It would require flying many miles out of their way.

At ATL it doesn't much matter as the terminal is convenient to both sides. At a place like DFW or MCO, the terminals are on opposite sides of the field, separated by highways and such requiring taxiing over bridges.

To plan your arrival to the opposite side of the field would require overflying the field and doubling back. It would cost time and money. Sometimes ATC will choose that course to avoid holding or delays on an already loaded arrival route.



I don't understand everything I don't know about this.
User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (6 years 9 months 2 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 2786 times:

In addition to what SPREE34 said, in situations where you have two parallel runways, the arrivals will (with a few exceptions) be landed on the outboard runway from the terminal, and the departures be off the inboard runway. In the case of MCO 35R, the outboard runway from the terminal on that side of the airport, traffic rolling out downfield will exit the runway and either (1) have to hold short for traffic departing 35L or (2) be cleared to taxi across 35L. This is alot easier than arrivals on 35L and every departure having to taxi across the end of 35L to get to 35R for departure.

User currently offlinePGNCS From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 2837 posts, RR: 45
Reply 10, posted (6 years 9 months 2 weeks 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 2759 times:



Quoting Mir (Reply 3):
I believe MCO generally sorts arrivals between the 18/36s and 17/35s based on where the arrival is coming from. Since you were coming from the east, it would make sense that you'd land on the 17/35s. As for why it would be 35R instead of 17L, that's just luck of the draw with the winds.

Spot on. I have flown in and out of MCO hundreds of times, and you GENERALLY will get the runways that don't require crossing the centerline of the field, i.e. if you are arriving from the east (e.g. Europe) you will get the 17/35s. If traffic is light ATC will try to accommodate requests for the other side of the field (some carriers have standing requests, in fact), but it's definitely not guaranteed. MCO uses 35R/17L for arrivals and 35L/17R for departures, for reasons OPNLguy explained. Again, if traffic is light, you may be able to get an inboard runway for arrival, but don't expect it very often.

Quoting SilentJC (Reply 7):
Again, I'm no expert... but for instance; if you're flying say Delta from Atlanta. As a pilot you know a few things. You know the expected weather at the destination, and you know where you're going to have to park. So wouldn't they plan a route that would pretty much assure you arrive on the correct side of the airfield? I know there are other factors to consider sometimes... but it'd seem to me that in planning the flight, you'd take those sorts of things into account.

Not saying you're wrong... just wondering if that tends to be the case?

No. The aircraft is flight planned for the most efficient air route, not the most efficient taxi route. It costs much more to fly the aircraft than to taxi it. If the pilots can work out a more convenient landing runway, then even better, but that's not a central criteria for planning.

Quoting OPNLguy (Reply 9):
In addition to what SPREE34 said, in situations where you have two parallel runways, the arrivals will (with a few exceptions) be landed on the outboard runway from the terminal, and the departures be off the inboard runway. In the case of MCO 35R, the outboard runway from the terminal on that side of the airport, traffic rolling out downfield will exit the runway and either (1) have to hold short for traffic departing 35L or (2) be cleared to taxi across 35L. This is alot easier than arrivals on 35L and every departure having to taxi across the end of 35L to get to 35R for departure.

Yes, and obviously this isn't unique to MCO, look at LAX, ATL, etc.


User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (6 years 9 months 2 weeks 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 2757 times:



Quoting PGNCS (Reply 10):
Yes, and obviously this isn't unique to MCO, look at LAX, ATL, etc.

Roger that--PHL is one of the few exceptions that I've noted....


User currently offlinePGNCS From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 2837 posts, RR: 45
Reply 12, posted (6 years 9 months 2 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 2701 times:



Quoting OPNLguy (Reply 11):
Quoting PGNCS (Reply 10):
Yes, and obviously this isn't unique to MCO, look at LAX, ATL, etc.

Roger that--PHL is one of the few exceptions that I've noted....

Yeah, but PHL screws almost everything up, you know that!  Wink


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