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Scariest Moment On The Ramp  
User currently offlinePilotNTrng From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 897 posts, RR: 3
Posted (6 years 3 months 5 hours ago) and read 5829 times:

This is a forum for those that have experienced an event that made the hair on the back of your neck stand up. I recall back in 99 when I was a lead for DGS in CHS. I came in to pick up my paycheck and was in "civilian" clothes. My boss and I were talking and we look out and watched a guy push back a Comair CRJ-200 from the gate. All of a sudden a massive white plume of smoke poured out of the APU exaust port. We walked to the glass to watch to see what was going on. The pushback driver, a supervisor with a headset, stopped immediatly and the foward door immediatly opened. Passengers disembarked and my boss and I ran outside. We could tell it was an APU fire. We heard the first bottle deploy. My boss told me to run and get an extingisher. Of course my adrenaline is pumping and I grabbed a tiny hand held one and as I was running back I realized my stupidity and went and got the dolly. A USAF reserve mechanic was our GSE mech. and he advised all was ok. He took no more than five steps back, when I would guess a 5 foot flame shot out of the exaust port. He examined the area again and then the second bottle fired off. Scared the hell out of all us as we were pretty close to the action. The Air Force emergency crew hustled over and helped secure the scene. Talk about almost peeing my pants. That was insane. Im sure some have seen somethings more intense, but that one takes the cake for me.


Booooo Lois, Yaaaa Beer!!!
24 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineFlyDeltaJets From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 1843 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (6 years 3 months 3 hours ago) and read 5805 times:
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I was towing in SA 343 to gate 7 in Terminal 3 at JFK during a major snowstorm. The towbar disconnected from the plane and began to coast toward the tractor I was driving. I yelled to the captain "Brakes, Brakes, Brakes" and he was like why we are not at the gate yet then I yelled brakes again, I guess he realized that something was wrong and he set the parking brake. At this point the plane had rolled up halfway onto the towbar and stop less than a foot away from the tractor. I was shaking so bad after that I didn't know what to do with myself. Come to find out later the towbar latch pin was rusted through, and in out haste to get this first arrival of the day in we ended up almost literally killing our selves


The only valid opinions are those based in facts
User currently offlineCharlienorth From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 1119 posts, RR: 5
Reply 2, posted (6 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 5737 times:

Pushing a DC-10,I was on headsets,the extension cord wasn't available so being the tough guy I was,I plugged in the headset cord,this gave me no room to move and at a point during the push I felt something rubbing against my foot,i looked down and realized that I was playing footsie with the nose wheel..ouch
Been too many others than i care to think of...no doubt one of the more dangerous work places!


User currently offlineBuzz From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 697 posts, RR: 22
Reply 3, posted (6 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 5717 times:

Hi PilotNTrng, Buzz here. The most recent one was a 737 arriving at the gate, #2 engine had just shut down. So a "baggage handling associate" drove up to the forward cargo door with a belt loader.

The engine's still turning pretty fast even though no fuel's burning... and the driver's seat of the belt loader has to be a foot away from the inlet as you drive up to the airplane... I thought I was going to see an "ingestion".

A few years ago an A+P was inhaled by a Continental 737 at ELP, the suction reaches out a few feet and around the lip of the Nose cowl. I didn't look at the picture of the Red Inlet for more than a couple seconds. Yuck.

You have to keep the hazard areas in mind when you're out among the flying machines. Safety habits help keep you alive when you're tired or distracted. Build a little "cushion" into what you do so you have room to make mistakes.

OK, enough soapbox preaching.
g'day


User currently offlineTranspac787 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 3190 posts, RR: 13
Reply 4, posted (6 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 5709 times:

Earlier this winter I was working the UAX Dash-8's at DEN. Whenever we pull them into the gate, they'll feather the props and run the engines until we plug them into ground power, standard procedure for us. It was snowing pretty hard though, and the ground was slicker than hell, so we pull the once Dash in and I was kneeling at the nose about to plug the plane in when he feathered the props. Well, I guess that gives a bit of a lateral kick to the plane somehow, because that nose just swung over faster than anything. I dove (or slid) out of the way, as the plane slid to mabye 40-50 degrees nose off from centerline. Luckily the pilots shut down the engines ASAP, because if that plane kept sliding around those props were going to eat something, or someone, really quickly.


A340-500: 4 engines 4 long haul. 777-200LR: 2 engines 4 longer haul
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 13967 posts, RR: 63
Reply 5, posted (6 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 5696 times:

Quoting Buzz (Reply 3):
Hi PilotNTrng, Buzz here. The most recent one was a 737 arriving at the gate, #2 engine had just shut down. So a "baggage handling associate" drove up to the forward cargo door with a belt loader.

The engine's still turning pretty fast even though no fuel's burning... and the driver's seat of the belt loader has to be a foot away from the inlet as you drive up to the airplane... I thought I was going to see an "ingestion".

I've seen this in Frankfurt too, these idiots walking up to a still running engine or one that has just been shut own to put the traffic cones into place ("time is money" and the faster they get the plane down, the faster they can go back into their break room). Scared the sh*t out off me. And if you remind them, half of them would not understand, unless you speak Turkish.
At our airport, I had to give a serious bollocking to one of our cleaners. He walked across the taxiway on the ramp (normally permitted, but you have to watch out for planes), towing a vacuum cleaner behind him like a dog, to go to the next position. He was standing right on the yellow line, when a 737 taxied in. He was literally standing there like a deer in the headlight, staring at the plane. forcing the plane to stop. I yelled at him to get back behind the red line, and he eventualy did it. I went up to him and gave him a piece of my mind. He replied that it was not so bad, since the pilot had seen him, as if he had the right of way, but I think that he only understood half of what I said (he was Albanian).
I then went to his foreman and told him that, if I would see something like this happen again, I would go to the top boss and get this cleaner fired, as a danger to himself and others.
The foreman had a little problem though, he is Turkish (but speaks perfect German), but this cleaner was his deputy foreman's father-in-law, so he had his deputy sort him out (the deputy, an Albanian, who has been working here since a long time and brought half of his family into the company, speaks good German. I wonder how he explained it to his father-in-law, without having serious family trouble ).

For myself, the most dangerous situation happened in CGN, when I was almost squashed flat by a runaway 14 ton main deck LD. I was walking along on the ramp, when a cargo tug driver took a corner a bit too sharp and either the pallet lock on the freight dolly broke or he forgot to close it properly in first place, anyway, the container followed the laws of centrifugal force and went off the dolly, sliding towards me. It only stopped a few feet away from me.

Another time, when I was minding the CIA base for a big freight carrier, one weekend all civilian flights from CIA were transfered to FCO due to an international NATO summit (CIA is half military and they used this airport for all the VIP planes including USAF 1). FCO was in a chaos, and after having spend all day there, with lots of overtime, I just wanted to go out to have a meal and to see my bed. The 757 I was taking care off, had a very delayed slot, and finally, when it was push back time, there was a fully grown thunderstorm right overhead. On the other hand, missing the slot would have meant another few hours delay and more overtime for myself. I decided to walk out this plane on the headset anyway, even though it was scary, with bolts of lightning everywhere around me.


Jan

[Edited 2008-04-27 01:06:27]

User currently offlineAh64Dmech From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (6 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 5689 times:

When I worked for Mesa in PHX a few years ago, a co worker and I were pushing back a Beech 1900 from the gate. Standard was to push the aircraft back onto the line, disconnect the pushback, and hold in front of the aircraft until both engines were started to. ensure a good start then clear out of the way. Well he and I were sitting on the disconnected pushback watching the starts when all of a sudden the aircraft started rolling forward and picking up speed at an alarming rate. The nose wheel of the Beech jumped up into the bucket of the pushback and began pushing it forward. Before the pilot could set the brakes the pushback had been turned at least 45 degrees left and the other guy and I were fleeing to avoid a spinning prop. The pilot shutdown and got out. He didn't realize he was moving until they jumped into the bucket, and it was clear he forgot to set the brakes.

Another more recent incident occurred here in Iraq last month. I was guiding an AH-64D back out of it's parking pad. The center of the aircraft was just about over the taxiway line so I signaled for him to turn the nose to the left, but alas no turn. The aircraft instead began to pick up speed back and I went for cover as I was sure the tail rotor was going to hit the blast wall on the other side of the taxiway. Luckily the tail wheel seemed to pop right and the nose turned very quickly. I wasn't around to talk to the pilot after the flight, but I'm certain he forgot to turn the tail wheel lock switch off before backing.


-ah64Dmech


User currently offlineSoku39 From United States of America, joined Nov 2000, 1797 posts, RR: 9
Reply 7, posted (6 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 5669 times:

I've never seen anything personally, but I have almost killed myself by walking into a prop. One weekend my airport had an open day, so the management had us taxi all the airplanes to the end of old closed grass runway so they could be away from the visitors for the next morning. Well long story short there was some confusion on where they actually wanted us to park (none of us had headsets or the hand mic). I shut mine down, so I could go talk to the person behind me. Well long story short I started to approach his window from the front, and came 2 steps away from walking in his prop arc. It was by far the scariest thing thats ever happened to me around an airplane (on the ground). I was literally shaking when I realized how close I came to chopping myself up. BE CAREFUL OUT THERE!

[Edited 2008-04-27 02:35:35]


The Ohio Player
User currently offlineAgentXE1225 From United States of America, joined Apr 2008, 166 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (6 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 5649 times:

I almost hesitate to post this b/c 1)was too new to be scared at the time, and 2)lotta rj-hatrs on a.net, but here goes. EWR on GDP and inbound flt early. (wouldn't have it any other way!) CA orders few xtra 100lbs fuel, flt gets boarded at reasonable time, then EWR goes to GS. (go figure) Flt deplaned. More fuel ordered, against advice of dispatch. EWR out of GS and flt released. A/C now too heavy to even leave gate. APU been on for bit but can't burn enough fuel fast enough. Long story short, I end up sitting on a large pushback that is connected to an aircraft running it's APU and spinning BOTH ENGINES WHILE PARKED AT THE FRIGGIN' GATE! (He IS Captain, so he knows what he's doing, right?) Bottom line, e-brake was only thing keeping me from being a bloody brick-wall mural. Should have told him to get f**ked. He was advised not to add xtra fuel unless absolutely necessary.

User currently offlineFr8Mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5345 posts, RR: 14
Reply 9, posted (6 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 5590 times:

In 21 years, I've twice felt in mortal danger:

Pushback, well going forward now, on the headset, starting engines, the tug driver had me at a slow jog. I signalled for him to slow down. He wasn't looking at me, he was looking over his shoulder in the direction he was going. Another ramp type catches his attention and signals him to slow down. He, somehow, interprets this as an emergency stop. He lays on the brakes. The towbar flexes, old DC8, tubular aluminum and snaps. The towbar head digs into the concrete and raises the nose 6 or 8 inches. The aircraft comes down on the tug. When the bar came apart, it missed me (so I was told) by several inches.


Again a DC8; troubleshooting a fuel leak at an engine mast found on preflight. Decide we're going to dry motor, then wet motor and see if it stops (pretty common, especially in the cold). After the 1st wet motor, the leak slowed down but didn't stop. We decided to wet motor again. In the meantime, junior had done his flight deck preflight and armed the ignition inverter. This means the ignitors (inboard engines only) will fire even if the circuit breaker is pulled. Tail pipe full of fuel and me under the engine and just aft of the the core cowl. I could feel the heat as the engine torched.



When seconds count...the police are minutes away. Never leave your cave without your club.
User currently offlineZANL188 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 3501 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (6 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 5557 times:
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From the military side of the house..

Many moons ago when i was young punk and brand new to the ramp....

I was assigned to drive a 10K forklift to the other side of the airfield to do a C-141 offload. Accompanying me was a transient alert (TA) truck (w/ ATC radio) and a k-loader.

Only way to get the K-loader to the other side was across the runway, this due to sharp turns on the perimeter road the k-loader couldn't handle. The procedure was the k-loader and I would follow the TA truck and TA would get all of our of clearances from ATC...

We get to the other side, do our offload. As we are cleaning up TA driver swings by and asks us to hurry up as wx is moving in and he needs to get back to the other side. So we set off...

Well apparently the TA driver is in a real hurry as after we cross the hold line he guns it and takes off, apparently unaware that the forklift and K-loader have governors..... my boss in the k-loaders also guns it with a huge cloud of diesel soot. Me in the tail end charlie position, I also gun it but apparently the k-loader is governed to a higher MPH as he quickly pulls away.

Then it starts to pour and I mean pour. I'm driving the 10K backwards as that affords somewhat better overall visibility but leaves me a bit blind on the right side. I can still see the TA truck as he crosses the runway - no sign of slowing, k-loader crosses without missing a beat. I get to the runway, no sign or indication from TA other than his tailights receding in the distance. Check tower for light gun signals - can't make him out in the rain, so i go for it!!.

Just before I get to centerline (this is one of those 300' wide SAC type runways) I hear this incredible screeching from my right along with a lot of light. Without looking I know it's a T-37 Tweet (the sound is unmistakable) that has just landed!! I immediately u-turn to clear the runway.

I stop and turn around. check underwear, good it's clean. T-37 has stopped and I can vaguely see pilot eyeballing me. he flashes landing lights, he's waiting on me. Still can't see tower. I head back across.

When I catch up with the boss he's drinking coffee in the lounge, all nice and dry. He's not even aware that he lost me. Me I'm dripping wet (no cab on that fork). Goes without saying we had an "interesting" conversation.



Legal considerations provided by: Dewey, Cheatum, and Howe
User currently offlineNomadd22 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 1829 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (6 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 5547 times:

I once saw an engineer come out to a 737 with hydraulic problems and he had a screwdriver. I had nightmares for weeks.


Andy Goetsch
User currently offlineFlyASAGuy2005 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 7004 posts, RR: 11
Reply 12, posted (6 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 5495 times:



Quoting AgentXE1225 (Reply 8):

I know what you mean about the who RJ thing  Wink.

So we were at the gate waiting for final paperwork from the captain so I gave the captain the go ahead to start his engine in hotel mode (this was an ATR) which he did. Then I signaled to my wing walker to disconnect the GPU from the a/c and also disconnect the air conditioning hose. Well, right has he was tugging with the hose, I gues the prop brake gave way for some reason and I started to hear those Hamilton blades flutter in the wind as the ATR does best so I jump off the Lektro to signal to the captain to kill the engine and at the same time, start yelling at my guy to get out of there because I had seemd to be in a daze right as everything went down.

He wasn't hurt but needless to see we had to almost send him to the restroom to clean his shorts if you know what I mean. Other than that, i've never seen anything too crazy.



What gets measured gets done.
User currently offlineAgentXE1225 From United States of America, joined Apr 2008, 166 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (6 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 5468 times:



Quoting FlyASAGuy2005 (Reply 12):
Other than that, i've never seen anything too crazy

Hehehe! This one will go up on the ramp doing dumb things, but about 2 wks ago, Airlink dude in Toyota p/u parks at b-3 and gets out to do something. mistake 1-left truck running. mistake-2 didn't put truck in park or set e-brake. cop friend said the truck slowly went backwards up to b-5, bounced off concrete things NW uses instead of cones, and keeps bouncing up that side of b terminal (in slow circles) until stopped by a jetbridge! cop has pics of whole thing, so I'm gonna try and talk him out of them so i can post them!  rotfl 


User currently offlineDC8FriendShip From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 242 posts, RR: 3
Reply 14, posted (6 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 5275 times:



Quoting PilotNTrng (Thread starter):
He examined the area again and then the second bottle fired off.

Too bad the CRJ only has one APU bottle- one of those noises you heard was something else going on in that little screaming demons doghouse.

Quoting Ah64Dmech (Reply 6):
He didn't realize he was moving until they jumped into the bucket, and it was clear he forgot to set the brakes.

Or it slipped off when he wasn't paying attention, as 1900's parking brakes sometimes like to do.



Come fly the Friendly Skies of United
User currently offlineAlias1024 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 2745 posts, RR: 2
Reply 15, posted (6 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day ago) and read 5258 times:



Quoting Transpac787 (Reply 4):
It was snowing pretty hard though, and the ground was slicker than hell, so we pull the once Dash in and I was kneeling at the nose about to plug the plane in when he feathered the props. Well, I guess that gives a bit of a lateral kick to the plane somehow, because that nose just swung over faster than anything. I dove (or slid) out of the way, as the plane slid to mabye 40-50 degrees nose off from centerline.

I had a very similar incident on the Dash during a winter storm. Only difference was that the aircraft slid straight forward. As the captain cut the engines and we both stood on the brakes, but the aircraft slid a good six feet forward. Not fun watching the plane slide toward the terminal, while hoping the ramper plugging in the ground power has the sense to watch out for the props. We got a dirty look from the ramper, as he thought we had forgot to set the brakes.



It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems with just potatoes.
User currently offlinePilotNTrng From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 897 posts, RR: 3
Reply 16, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 4770 times:

The first time I had to chock the nose gear of the J41, was a bit hair raising. I was doing TDY in ORF, I think back in 1998. I had never worked one, let alone seen one before. I had the duty of chocking the nose gear while those props were still spinning. Bout peed the ole trousers. lol.



When I was very wet behind the ears back in 1998 in CHS, I was working the early morning shift. We had a DL 757, 727, and I believe just one OH CRJ originating. I was standing at the nose of the CRJ waiting to marshall them out when all of a sudden the 757's , which was fairly close to me at gate A2, anti- collision light came on. I thought that was strange because it wasn't to leave for a while yet. All of a sudden the number one engine spooled up and opened up like God knows what. I started to get pelted in the face with gravel and sand from the ramp. I ran up to my boss and said what the hell is going on here. He said, they are just checking a reverser calm down . Ahh my first technical learning experience lol That was not the only time I felt like a moron, can you believe that? ha ha.



Booooo Lois, Yaaaa Beer!!!
User currently offlineN353SK From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 820 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (6 years 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 4445 times:



Quoting DC8FriendShip (Reply 14):
Or it slipped off when he wasn't paying attention, as 1900's parking brakes sometimes like to do.

That's happened to me. I was marshalling out a 1900 and had the wands in a big old X to hold him while the beech next to him pulled out. Since the other plane had to taxi out into the alleyway, I was standing about 30 feet in front of my plane so it could get by. The 1900 I was holding suddenly lurched STRAIGHT AT ME because the parking brake slipped. I took off straight sideways and the captain got it stopped about 15 feet from me and 10 feet from the other aircraft. After that, I went inside and took an extra long break.


User currently offlineSuper737 From UK - Northern Ireland, joined Feb 2008, 105 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (6 years 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 4382 times:

Working out on the ramp one sunny evening watching an airbus taxi on stand nd the guy was bringing the rear steps but the bus stopped short of the airbridge nd the capt powered up to move and the guy (who was new) was a few inches from getting blown into the taxiway! All of us were screaming at him, but he was to oblivious to the fact and well he is no longer with us (got fired)


If its not a super tractor its not a plane
User currently offlineDl757md From United States of America, joined May 2004, 1562 posts, RR: 16
Reply 19, posted (6 years 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 4309 times:

Quoting PilotNTrng (Reply 16):
All of a sudden the number one engine spooled up and opened up like God knows what. I started to get pelted in the face with gravel and sand from the ramp. I ran up to my boss and said what the hell is going on here. He said, they are just checking a reverser calm down

Must have been contract mtc. You don't need to run the engine on a DL 757 to "check" the reverser. It is actually quite against company policy and is generally an expensive proposition as the engine tends to ingest a certain portion of that gravel and sand that was hitting you in the face.

My scariest moment has to be when we were in the run-up hole troubleshooting a twin HOC (high oil consumption) on one of our new ETOPS 757s, you know the ex AA/TWA birds. We had a guy from our crew under each engine and me at the nose, communicating to the cockpit with hand signals. They wanted to run both to takeoff power at the same time. Just as they reached TO power the plane starting rolling forward (we had neglected to chock the gear) and the guy running it didn't do anything. The guy under the left engine rolled inboard and waited momentarily for the gear to pass and the got to the center line of the plane and laid down prone head towards the tail. The guy under the right engine rolled toward the center and when he cleared the engine he got up and ran right in front of the main gear. Luckily he did not get run over and he joined the other guy and they laid together hoping the plane would stop before they got blasted. I was watching all of this happen while I'm running out of the way and frantically trying to tell the guy running the plane he's moving. Well after rolling about 75 feet and gettin up to I'd say about 15 mph he finally locked up the brakes and got her stopped and then cut the throttles. I'm not going to get into the details of what the ensuing conversation brought to light but let's just say we're all a little smarter now and thankfully all it cost us was a change of underwear.

DL757Md

[Edited 2008-05-06 20:29:05]


757 Most beautiful airliner in the sky!
User currently offlinePilotboi From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 2366 posts, RR: 9
Reply 20, posted (6 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 4178 times:



Quoting Super737 (Reply 18):
Working out on the ramp one sunny evening watching an airbus taxi on stand nd the guy was bringing the rear steps but the bus stopped short of the airbridge nd the capt powered up to move and the guy (who was new) was a few inches from getting blown into the taxiway! All of us were screaming at him, but he was to oblivious to the fact and well he is no longer with us (got fired)

All I understood from that is that a guy was behind an engine and almost got blown over. The rest I don't quite understand. And you are aware that there's an A in the word 'and', right?


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31667 posts, RR: 56
Reply 21, posted (6 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 4080 times:



Quoting Super737 (Reply 18):

Working out on the ramp one sunny evening watching an airbus taxi on stand nd the guy was bringing the rear steps but the bus stopped short of the airbridge nd the capt powered up to move and the guy (who was new) was a few inches from getting blown into the taxiway! All of us were screaming at him, but he was to oblivious to the fact and well he is no longer with us (got fired)

Watch the Anticollision lights is the key.Freshers should be briefed well in advance.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineWESTERN737800 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 693 posts, RR: 2
Reply 22, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 3589 times:

1. I used to work for an aerial sprayer. We had a ag plane with a radial engine come in for another load. It was hot with no wind. I'm walking up to the plane with the fuel hose, get about 10' from it and there was fire coming out of the exhaust going 10' straigt up in the air. I yelled at the pilot and he got back in, started it up and put the fire out.
2. Mesaba used to fly Dash-8s into my hometown. It's summertime and people put in bids to put up hay on the airport. We were taking a break and there was an H Farmall tractor heading in the direction of the DH8. The scary part was that the tractor was on fire and there was nobody driving it. Just when we were going to drive up there, the tractor stopped, could've been bad.
3. On our airport ramp when its icey, its usually widespread and easy to see. We had just a little powder snow on the ramp. I didn't think anything of it. I get on the tug, going a little bit fast. I was driving by the lobby, pointed at it on top of some snow. I applied the brakes, nothing happens. At the last minute I get steered away from the lobby. I thought about what the bosses would've said if they saw a tug sitting in the middle of their lobby. Why they keep me empolyed



Bring back Western Airlines!
User currently offlineFlymatt2bermud From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 563 posts, RR: 7
Reply 23, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 3398 times:

Back in '77 at FTY while I was doing a preflight a new Mercedes pulled up to a helicopter on a pad on the opposite side of the ramp. Two guys got out. One stood in front of the helicopter while the other hopped in and started it. After several minutes, I heard the rpms increase and l glanced over just in time to watch the pilot attempt to lift off the pad. There was one problem, the right skid was tied to the pad. It only took a few seconds for the helicopter to tilt enough to sheer the top off of the Mercedes and then flip on its side. I scrambled for cover as debris was literally flying everywhere. Fortunately there were no injuries, but surely a bad day for the owner/pilot's insurance companies.


"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward" Leonardo Da Vinci
User currently offlineApache323 From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 18 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 3261 times:



Quoting Ah64Dmech (Reply 6):

Similar story to AH-64D mechs some of our Apache pilots in Iraq will get past the center line while backing out and if they dont turn when we instruct them to they risk hitting blackhawks behind them, however there have been a few cases where they do not pay attention to us or the "tail wheel sticks" as they like to say and it gets pretty scary.


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