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Random 727 Config. Question.  
User currently offlineWNCrew From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 1457 posts, RR: 10
Posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 1979 times:

I have never really paid much attention to the 727 history and the differences between the 100 and 200 series but I recently noticed that they have strange differences in door placement over the two variants.

On the -100's they have a FWD Entry door, much like the 707, 757, 737 etc etc...but on the other side the (what would normally be FWD Service door) is located right in front of the wing? How did they service the FWD galley? Why was the door located to far back? Was this the case for ALL 727-100s?

On the -200 I notice that both FWD doors are roughly across from each other, again like the 737, but then just in front of the engines you have two more doors. That gave you two FWD door, 4 OWWE, 2 rear doors and a set of ventral stairs. What a difference over the -100.

Anyone have any history/insight into these big differences? What was interior config like on the -100's vs the -200's? Thanks so much for your time answering my rather random question.


ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
6 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineUsafdo From United States of America, joined Jan 2008, 443 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 1960 times:

The 727-100 had a mid-cabin galley used for both F & Y.

The 727-200 had a galley at 1R & 2L.

Interesting note. The 2L & 2R doors had unusual outside door handles unique only to the 727-200 series.

Way back when, United had 727-200's with a "Jet Escape" emergency exit door located between 1R/1L and the over the wing exits. Those were emergency only exits, similar to the ones on the 757-200 & 757-300 (Also the Super DC-8's had them as well). There were said to have been high seating capacity aircraft. I understand later the doors were plugged.

You can go to the Boeing web site and go to commerical aircraft, and then to aircraft no longer in production to see technical details.

Cheers!!


User currently offlineLGA777 From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 1149 posts, RR: 19
Reply 2, posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 1950 times:

The 727-100 mid cabin galleys could handle a catering truck no problem. Due to the much larger First Class cabins in the 60's-70's many 727-100 operators configured the cabin so that the entire cabin fwd of the mid-cabin galley was First Class.

And the rear cabin galleys on the 727-200 could be configured with the galley on the left or right side, with seats on the opposite side, with a few high density operators opting for no rear galleys, just more seats instead.

Hope that helps a little ?

LGA777


User currently offlineWNCrew From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 1457 posts, RR: 10
Reply 3, posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 1939 times:

WOW! Thanks guys! Those extra exits that you mentioned *at least in UAL* looked like they were covered up in the early 80's late 70's just judging by the photos. FIVE exits per side of the aircraft...for 11 total, that's INSANE! Even on a 737-900 you've got only 8 (save for the newer -ER model).

Even though the 727 had two variants, they seem like very different aircraft from a cabin crew / pax standpoint. I'd love to see some interior shots of the differences!



ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
User currently offlineSR100 From UK - England, joined Dec 2005, 109 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 6 days ago) and read 1902 times:

In addition what has been already said above, you have to consider, that on both main variants of the the 727, the front cabin had the similar layout as the 707/720 with a larger, three person flight-deck, more stowage space for electronic equipment, and the front lavatory opposite 1L. There was no lavatory between the flight-deck and 1L like you would find on a 737 or 757.
The 727-100 had two different window versions: Most had two windows between 1R and the first overwing exit, because there was a galley unit on both sides of 1R. The high density configuration, e.g. for Japanese carriers, had three windows, because there was only on galley unit in front of 1R.
Many airlines used to have a smaller or larger galley unit also opposite 1R on the left side.

On the 727-200, every thinkable layout of a galley could be found in the rear of the cabin. E.g. on a 727-200 of Air France, there was no galley at all in the rear, there were only two rows of six abreast seats between 2L/2R and the two lavatories in the very rear of the cabin.
Other airlines had the galley only between the mentioned two lavatories and one of the two rear service doors, or both service doors, e.g. Air Canada or Royal Air Maroc.
The most used configuration was to have the galley on the left - most common - or on the right, e.g. Western. It usually had the space of four rows of seats, two between the aft lavatory and 2L or right, and two rows between the mentioned doors and the overwing exits.
Lufthansa had for some time a configuration with the two rows of seats between the lavatories and 2L/R, and a galley unit between the two service doors and the main cabin.

The layout of the front galley was a little less creative, because there was always a galley unit between the mentioned front lavatory and 1R. Most airlines had a second galley unit after 1R and the cabin, usually having a couple of seat rows on the left side. Some had a small galley unit also right at 1L, and some had used the entire space on the left side as a galley up to a bulkhead opposite 1R, usually without the mentioned unit after 1R.

And not to forget to mention the modification of Dan Air's 727-100s, which had the service doors 2L/R of the 727-200 right in front of the engines, just to have engough emergency exits for the British high density charter configuration...



My favourite planes flown: Lockheed 188 Electra, Tridents, VC-10, B-707, L-1011, A330, E90 + Concorde
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25125 posts, RR: 22
Reply 5, posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 1807 times:



Quoting SR100 (Reply 4):
The 727-100 had two different window versions: Most had two windows between 1R and the first overwing exit, because there was a galley unit on both sides of 1R. The high density configuration, e.g. for Japanese carriers, had three windows, because there was only on galley unit in front of 1R.
Many airlines used to have a smaller or larger galley unit also opposite 1R on the left side.

I can't recall many (if any) North American carriers that operated the 727-100 with a galley unit on the left side opposite the galley service door. Some may have had a small closet in that area.

Quoting WNCrew (Reply 3):
Even though the 727 had two variants, they seem like very different aircraft from a cabin crew / pax standpoint. I'd love to see some interior shots of the differences!

In first class I preferred the 727-100 as the forward cabin was quieter with less noise and disturbance from the galley which was behind the cabin. On the 727-200 the first 3 rows of seats on the left side were directly oppposite the galley as on the 707 (except in the early years when many 707s had a first class lounge in that area).

CP Air's 727-100s were delivered with 22 F and 75 Y class seats with the F class seats occupying the entire forward cabin in front of the galley. That turned out to be too many F class seats and after a year or so the configuration was changed to 12 F and 90 Y.


User currently offlineDl_mech From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 1936 posts, RR: 9
Reply 6, posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 1761 times:



Quoting Usafdo (Reply 1):
Interesting note. The 2L & 2R doors had unusual outside door handles unique only to the 727-200 series.

UAL had "normal" style handles on their 2R doors.

This one is ex-UAL
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