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Curtiss C-46R - Late Development Of An Old Bird?  
User currently offlineHangarRat From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 633 posts, RR: 0
Posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 4052 times:

With a great pic of an Everts C46 on the front page, I decided to take a look at the other C46s in the photo database.


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Photo © Karl Drage



I found the following photo of a C-46R at LHR in 1957 with the titles "New Type C46-R" and the description "C46-R demonstrator."


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Photo © Frank Hudson



I can't find anything about an "R" type C46 on the Web. Did Curtiss develop an updated version of the C46 in the late 50s? Did Curtiss even exist after WWII?

I hope someone can shed some light on the story behind this photo.

Thanks.


Spell check is a false dog
11 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 1, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 4045 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR



Quoting HangarRat (Thread starter):
I can't find anything about an "R" type C46 on the Web.

Well heck, that's because you left a.net! Just head over to the Aircraft Data section, and you'll find this:

------------------------------------------------------
One postwar version though was the Riddles Airlines C46R which had more powerful engines and better performance. Thirty or so were converted.
------------------------------------------------------

I believe it had R-2800s...

2H4



Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlinePtrjong From Netherlands, joined Mar 2005, 3906 posts, RR: 19
Reply 2, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 4035 times:

http://www.uswarplanes.net/c46.html

Quote:
Riddle C-46R - 1956, performance upgrades for civil applications.
Three versions: C-46R-1, C-46R-5, C-46R-10.



Quoting 2H4 (Reply 1):
I believe it had R-2800s...

Correct, 2,130-hp R-2800s according to the German Wikipedia C-46 page.

Quoting HangarRat (Thread starter):
Did Curtiss even exist after WWII?

Wikipedia:

Quote:
The Curtiss-Wright Corporation (NYSE: CW) was once a leading aircraft manufacturer of the United States, but has since become a component manufacturer, specializing in actuators, controls, valves, and metal treatment.

Curtiss-Wright failed to make the transition to design and production of jet aircraft, despite several attempts. The final nail in the coffin was the choice of the Northrop F-89 Scorpion over the XF-87 Blackhawk; after the F-87 was cancelled 10 October 1948, Curtiss-Wright shut down its entire Aeroplane Division and sold the assets to North American Aviation.

Curtiss XF-87:


Peter Smile



The only difference between me and a madman is that I am not mad (Salvador Dali)
User currently offlineOldAeroGuy From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 3476 posts, RR: 67
Reply 3, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 4026 times:



Quoting HangarRat (Thread starter):
Did Curtiss even exist after WWII?

It still exists today, although in a different capacity as noted by Ptrjong.

http://www.curtisswright.com/



Airplane design is easy, the difficulty is getting them to fly - Barnes Wallis
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 4, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 4021 times:

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 1):

Spoken like a database editor who knows his stuff.
Well done sir.

edit: Speling sp

[Edited 2008-05-10 08:36:51]


Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 24891 posts, RR: 22
Reply 5, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 3966 times:



Quoting Ptrjong (Reply 2):
Quoting 2H4 (Reply 1):
I believe it had R-2800s...

Correct, 2,130-hp R-2800s according to the German Wikipedia C-46 page.

I believe almost all C-46s had the R-2800. Only the first few had R-2600s. I think those were semi-prototypes before the design was finalized.


User currently offline411A From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 1826 posts, RR: 8
Reply 6, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 3958 times:

Yes, most later C-46's had R-2800 engines.
Single speed blower.
However, some later (still) aircraft were 'T-category' (IE: Transport Category) airplanes, and fully met CAR4b specifications.
The Dunes Hotel in Las Vegas had one of these, and they uploaded passengers in LGB and BUR and flew them FOC (free oif charge) to the Dunes in LAS, where the passengers gambled to their hearts content, until 6am, whereupon they were flown back to BUR/LGB.
FOC.

And yes (again), this airplane had a piano up front, for passenger entertainment.

An actual fact...as I personally knew the pilots who flew the airplane.

PS: The Hacienda Hotel had a DC-4, which flew the same route..without piano.
High rollers are ALWAYS accomodated.

Same-same with flights to LAS, with the Sands Hotel L1011's.
Have bucks, will travel.


User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6346 posts, RR: 3
Reply 7, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 3936 times:



Quoting HangarRat (Thread starter):
I can't find anything about an "R" type C46 on the Web. Did Curtiss develop an updated version of the C46 in the late 50s? Did Curtiss even exist after WWII?

The Commando was originally intended to be a civil airliner until WWII intervened.

If you've ever stood beneath one, they are *GIGANTIC* birds. Makes a DC-3 seem tiny.

Here's a pic of one on our ramp at Southwest Aviation in LRU (where I worked as a lineboy while in college  Wink Sad


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Photo © Michael Baldock



It belonged to Hal Kading, the FBO owner...



Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 24891 posts, RR: 22
Reply 8, posted (6 years 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 3866 times:



Quoting KELPkid (Reply 7):
If you've ever stood beneath one, they are *GIGANTIC* birds. Makes a DC-3 seem tiny.

Still a few C-46s hauling cargo in northern Canada, as they've been doing for about 60 years.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VVaBPTK20a4
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YYI2KdblpHo
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hrorwzLrWM8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XLyuoS9Wclo


User currently offlineScooter01 From Norway, joined Nov 2006, 1199 posts, RR: 8
Reply 9, posted (6 years 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 3848 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!



Quoting KELPkid (Reply 7):
If you've ever stood beneath one, they are *GIGANTIC* birds. Makes a DC-3 seem tiny.

I remember these yellow birds from the good old days at FBU...  old 

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Photo © Dave Jones



Scooter01



"We all have a girl and her name is nostalgia" - Hemingway
User currently offlineImperialEagle From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 2529 posts, RR: 23
Reply 10, posted (6 years 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 3841 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!



Quoting KELPkid (Reply 7):
Makes a DC-3 seem tiny

Are more like a DC-4 in size!

CW had great plans to try to market pax versions of the aircraft post-war and did manage to sell some to NE.
EA took a good look at them as well, but decided to go with Martin instead.

The aircraft had hurriedly been designed "by committee" and rushed into service in WWII.EA was selected by the Air Transport Command to de-bug them. It took EA about a year to get the "bugs" out of them (and practically had to re-design them) and get the proper mods underway at the factory. In the mean time flying them through South America and out to Africa as well.

From time to time you will hear unkind things said about them especially the comments of them being unreliable aircraft.
However, with the P&W 2800's you just couldn't get a more reliable powerplant. The propellers. however, were another story and the keeping the Curtiss-Electric units clean were imperative!
The aircraft certainly proved themselves flying the "Hump" during WWII.

The "Non-Sched" carriers of the post WWII era loved them. A company my father worked for had them and flew them out of Miami to areas along the Gulf Coast.
Upstart cargo carriers snatched them up and they became the preferred transport for freighting between MIA and the South American countries----and they were crashed with alarming regularity well into the 1960's----many of them around Miami and not a few ended up in Biscayne Bay.

I will always remember the deafening noise the props made during high engine speed ops such as take-off.
In the cockpit the noise was so loud it could bring tears to your eyes.
There was no mistaking that sound either. For the rest of my life I will always recognize the sound of a C-46 take-off from memory!  old 



"If everything seems under control, you're just not going fast enough!"
User currently offlineWrenchBender From Canada, joined Feb 2004, 1779 posts, RR: 9
Reply 11, posted (6 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 3744 times:



Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 8):
Still a few C-46s hauling cargo in northern Canada, as they've been doing for about 60 years.

http://www.buffaloairways.com/curtiss-c-46.htm
Worked next door to them for 3 years. It's a wonderful noise when their ramp is busy.

WrenchBender



Silly Pilot, Tricks are for kids.......
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