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What Makes The "Ding" Sound?  
User currently offlineSoxfan From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 865 posts, RR: 0
Posted (6 years 4 months 3 weeks 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 18789 times:

Hi Everyone,

I know this is kind of a dumb question, but is there technically an instrument that makes the "ding" chimes sound on aircraft? I've heard different tones on different planes (Boeing 757, Boeing 777, Airbus, MD, Embraer, etc.) and I'm just curious if there's any specific instrument used to record it. Thanks!  Smile


Pilot: "Request push, which way should we face?" JFK Ground: "You better face the front, sir, or you'll scare the pax!"
36 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineTWAL1011727 From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 630 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (6 years 4 months 3 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 18714 times:

Most if not all transport category A/C have a interphone/ PA amplifier black box in the E&E bay.
It takes cockpit headset/microphones and cabin telephone and speakers and channels it thru this box.
Whenever a call is initiated, the PA black box sends an elect chime thru the speaker system to tell the cabin or cockpit that there is a call. There are different amount of chimes to announce a interphone call.
All conversations/calls go thru this box.
Also thru this box is the Pax address(hence PA) so pilots and FAs can talk to the pax

"Ding"...."You are now free to move about the country"
No WN didn't have the ding first but they sure have used it to their advantage.

No doubt somebody will assist in my explanations

KD


User currently offlineMax777geek From Italy, joined Mar 2007, 538 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (6 years 4 months 3 weeks 2 days ago) and read 18559 times:

If you refer to the noise you hear right after landing, while taxiing, it may be the switching of the electrical bus from the engines generators to the apu or ground power. At least, on the md80s, it's pretty noisy. Maybe on airbus or last boeing that's automatic and silent.

User currently offlineSoxfan From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 865 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (6 years 4 months 3 weeks 2 days ago) and read 18560 times:



Quoting Max777geek (Reply 2):

The "ding" I'm actually referring to is the intercom chime (i.e. low ding=fasten seat belt or indication from pilot to cabin crew, high+low ding=intercom call, high ding=passenger call button). I'm just wondering if there's specifically an instrument (a bell, perhaps?) that makes that sound (like, as the first respondent said, the one you hear on the Southwest commercials) and why that sound is produced somewhat differently on different types of aircrafts, such as the ones I listed in my OP. Thanks  Smile



Pilot: "Request push, which way should we face?" JFK Ground: "You better face the front, sir, or you'll scare the pax!"
User currently offlineJAGflyer From Canada, joined Aug 2004, 3537 posts, RR: 4
Reply 4, posted (6 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 18525 times:

I believe the modern aircraft have a computer generated "ding" while older aircraft may use a physical bell which "dings" when the button is pressed.


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User currently offlineRwessel From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 2353 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (6 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 18390 times:
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Quoting JAGflyer (Reply 4):
I believe the modern aircraft have a computer generated "ding" while older aircraft may use a physical bell which "dings" when the button is pressed.

I have trouble believing that any aircraft with an actual public-address-type intercom system would actually have a mechanical bell for the chime. It's quite trivial to make the intercom speakers produce that sound (even if you were building the circuit out of vacuum tubes).


User currently offline57AZ From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 2550 posts, RR: 2
Reply 6, posted (6 years 4 months 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 18151 times:

The modern aircraft have it electrically designed into the system. Using bell or whistle codes for communication is a holdover from the pre-radio days of navigation and railways. Railroads used a communication line that was connected between the cars on the rear of the train and the locomotive cab. The communications cords (later air lines) were connected to a gong (later a whistle) in the cab. The conductor would signal the engineman when to start, stop, back, etc. using the bell/whistle code. On steamers and early diesel motor vessels, the bridge's engine order telegraph was connected to a gong in the engine room. When the command was changed, the gong would sound the bell code. Early steamers used only the bell code, but later steamers used the bell only to alert the engineer on duty that the orders had changed. A mechanical pointer would point to the new orders. Answering the new orders from the engine room would sound a gong on the bridge, indicating receipt of the new orders and the pointer on the receiving telegraph would also reflect the change.

Railroads also used chimes to announce the start of meal service in the dining cars. A steward would walk through the cars ringing the chimes, announcing the start of the seating and directing the passengers to the location of the dining car.



"When a man runs on railroads over half of his lifetime he is fit for nothing else-and at times he don't know that."
User currently offlineG4LASRamper From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 170 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (6 years 4 months 3 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 18115 times:

G4's MD-80 series fleet has a mix of electronically generated and mechanical chimes installed. So yes, there are mechanical chimes still flying on some transport aircraft today.


"A pig that doesn't fly is just a pig." - Porco Rosso
User currently offlineSoxfan From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 865 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (6 years 4 months 3 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 18113 times:

Thanks for your comments, everyone, I appreciate it! It's been a topic that I've wondered about for a while now, so I thought I might bring the question to the experts on A.Net!  Smile


Pilot: "Request push, which way should we face?" JFK Ground: "You better face the front, sir, or you'll scare the pax!"
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 9, posted (6 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 18041 times:

Just to add there are Two chimes....High & low.....A combination of both or singly used identifies a call,either cockpit call.attendant call from seat,attendant call from toilet.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineSoxfan From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 865 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (6 years 4 months 2 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 17974 times:



Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 9):

Correct, thanks for that...the next time you're flying on different aircraft types (i.e. Embraer vs. Airbus vs. Boeing), if you listen to the type of chimes you might understand where my question is coming from! (I hope  Wink)



Pilot: "Request push, which way should we face?" JFK Ground: "You better face the front, sir, or you'll scare the pax!"
User currently offlineSashA From Russia, joined May 1999, 861 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (6 years 4 months 2 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 17924 times:

I noticed on 737NG when flaps are lowered to 20 (or 15) degrees, chime is triggered automatically?

Is this procedure true for all aircraft. I assumed this is a sign for crew walking about the cabin checking up on pax belts... to stop walking about the cabin  Smile and that plane is on final pattern for landing...

Would be grateful if someone confirmed or explained the real deal with this.

Thank you!



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User currently offlineSoxfan From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 865 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (6 years 4 months 2 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 17899 times:



Quoting SashA (Reply 11):

I always assumed that the "ding" sound was triggered by a button pressed by someone from the flight deck, but being in no way involved with the aviation industry I could be wrong. The only reason I think this is because the timing of the "ding" as a signal for the cabin crew to move around might be affected by the presence of, or potential for, turbulence which may prevent them from going about their duties.

And a little off topic, but I know that during the descent, Delta does a "quadruple-ding," I guess it could be called, to indicate the descent to flight attendants, while AA does a single ding. What code do other airlines use?



Pilot: "Request push, which way should we face?" JFK Ground: "You better face the front, sir, or you'll scare the pax!"
User currently offlineGoldenshield From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 6049 posts, RR: 14
Reply 13, posted (6 years 4 months 2 weeks 6 days ago) and read 17829 times:



Quoting Rwessel (Reply 5):
It's quite trivial to make the intercom speakers produce that sound

A quick search on Google provides many links to electronics companies who have plans for making many different styles of audible alarms, including chimes, and judging how small they are, they shouldn't be more than $10 to make.



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User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 14, posted (6 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 17689 times:



Quoting SashA (Reply 11):
I noticed on 737NG when flaps are lowered to 20 (or 15) degrees, chime is triggered automatically?

On the B737....Seat Belt & No Smoking signs are linked to the Flap & gear positions if the switch is in Auto.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineSanthosh From India, joined Sep 2001, 545 posts, RR: 1
Reply 15, posted (6 years 4 months 1 week 6 hours ago) and read 17320 times:

I was wondering if the sound of the chime would be available somewhere in the net for downloading purpose in an mp3 format. I just love that chime. If somebody know where I can fine one, kindly drop in the url.

Regards
George



Happy Landing
User currently offlineKnoxibus From France, joined Aug 2007, 260 posts, RR: 23
Reply 16, posted (6 years 4 months 1 week 5 hours ago) and read 17302 times:

On Airbus A/C (A320Fam, Long Range and A380), the whole interphone, passenger address functionalities are managed by the CIDS (Cabin Intercommunication Data System).

It has up to three controllers (called directors) and they are the one generating high or low frequency chimes which can have different frequency of repeat and different length with at least 8 or 9 different tones. They are then broadcasted through the cabin and/or crew area loudspeakers.

All these chimes are entirely "customisable" (pax call, cockpit call, emergency evacuation, No Smoking or seat belt signs activation, etc...)



No matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world.
User currently offlineHelvknight From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (6 years 4 months 1 week ago) and read 17248 times:



Quoting Soxfan (Reply 12):
And a little off topic, but I know that during the descent, Delta does a "quadruple-ding," I guess it could be called, to indicate the descent to flight attendants, while AA does a single ding. What code do other airlines use?

LX do a quadruple ding to indicate when the aircraft is on either the downwind leg or on final, I'm not sure which. It's pretty soon before landing. They also do a quadruple ding when the aircraft is next for takeoff. if you look up at the PSU you'll see that it is actually a double cycle of the seat belt sign or the no smoking sign.

Many Airbii also give a ding when the gear finishes it's transition either to fully up and stowed or down and locked. It coincides with the exit signs going on or off.


User currently offlineTod From Denmark, joined Aug 2004, 1727 posts, RR: 3
Reply 18, posted (6 years 4 months 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 17219 times:



Quoting Goldenshield (Reply 13):
they shouldn't be more than $10 to make.

But like many things that go into a commercial aircraft x100 by the time that component is deemed airworthy.

Tod


User currently offlineTimT From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 168 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 16989 times:

B-757 have that chime hooked to an aneroid- at 10,000 feet, "DING". At least on the cofiguration we have

User currently offlineB6A322 From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 291 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 9857 times:

Quoting Santhosh (Reply 15):
I was wondering if the sound of the chime would be available somewhere in the net for downloading purpose in an mp3 format
. I just love that chime. If somebody know where I can fine one, kindly drop in the url.

I have one in Mp3 format on my phone (the High-Low Seatbelt ding) that I use as my text message tone. I'd be more than happy to send it to you via email or text message if you PM me.



The content I post is solely my own opinion. It is not an official statement by/of/for nor representative of any company
User currently offlinepmk From United States of America, joined May 1999, 664 posts, RR: 2
Reply 21, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 9773 times:

I recall being on a Sun Country DC-10 and the chime was obviously mechanical, and broken! Rather than making a reverberating ding sound it made a short, non-resonant "clank" when activated.

PMK


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 22, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 9592 times:

Quoting TimT (Reply 19):
B-757 have that chime hooked to an aneroid- at 10,000 feet, "DING". At least on the cofiguration we have

I guess you are referring to the Cabin Alt warning.
regds
MEL.



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlinetdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 80
Reply 23, posted (3 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 9323 times:

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 22):
Quoting TimT (Reply 19):
B-757 have that chime hooked to an aneroid- at 10,000 feet, "DING". At least on the cofiguration we have

I guess you are referring to the Cabin Alt warning.

Cabin Alt warning is a horn, and it goes off higher than 10,000' I think.

TimT is talking about the automatic ding wired to the airplane (not cabin) altitude.

Tom.


User currently offlinedynamicsguy From Australia, joined Jul 2008, 873 posts, RR: 9
Reply 24, posted (3 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 9234 times:

With apologies to Monty Python - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=arCITMfxvEc - the noise must be made by the machine which goes "ding".  

25 Northwest727 : The different ding sounds between different airplane manufacturers and models is like a Mac vs. PC pop-up information box (whatever its called) sound.
26 Post contains images etherealsky : It doesn't count as an airliner, but I've seen the chime/bell mechanism from a King Air 100; it was a little box with wires coming from it located in
27 b78710 : if i remember rightly on the B744 all chimes heard in the cabin are generated by the PAC (Passenger Address Controller), flight deck chimes are genera
28 Post contains images KELPkid : Whoever makes the electronic "dingers" must have cranked out a few million for the Ford Motor Company in the 1980's My parents and I all drove Fords i
29 Max Q : Thats classic stuff Dynamics Guy. Monty Python never gets old ! Graham Chapman RIP
30 babybus : BA aircraft have a ding when the aircraft enters the active runway. Is that somehow automatically generated or does a flight deck member push a button
31 Post contains images SirThomas : I have always wondered what all the 'bongs' were for during take off and the like Interesting to read through all of this On a related topic, does any
32 b78710 : pink is attendant to attendant call orange is toilet to attendant call blue is seat to attendant call on our aircraft anyway
33 Soxfan : What's the procedure when this light is illuminated? Seems to put FA's in a bit of an awkward position...
34 PlaneWasted : As an electrical engineer, I guess that on older airplanes, it's some kind of electrical oscillator generating the sounds. And on newer ones, it's is
35 eoinnz : Thankfully in nearly 6 years of flying I've never had this light go off for anything serious. It's usually someone pushing the flight attendant call
36 Post contains images KevinL1011 : On the 'ol DC-1 and a half they used this. On modern aircraft it's a simple audio tone generator.[Edited 2010-10-31 01:13:14]
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