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Aircraft Fuel Capacities  
User currently offlinePillowTester From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 245 posts, RR: 0
Posted (6 years 7 months 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 15004 times:

I'd like to find a list of different airliners and their fuel capacities, for a research project. Is there somewhere I can find this information?


...said Dan jubilantly.
41 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineRJdxer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (6 years 7 months 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 15002 times:

Your best bet to get accurate info would be to post this in tech/ops.

User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25999 posts, RR: 22
Reply 2, posted (6 years 7 months 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 14970 times:

For current and former Boeing and Douglas/McDonnell Douglas types, click the aircrat type in the first column in following table, then click "Airplane description" for the specific model you're interested in and scroll down a few pages (it's fairly close to the top) and the last column of the table shows "Usable fuel". Some aircraft may have optional supplementary fuel tanks etc. which may not be mentioned.
http://www.boeing.com/commercial/airports/plan_manuals.html


User currently offlineFuturecaptain From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (6 years 7 months 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 14931 times:

www.boeing.com
www.airbus.com


User currently offlinePillowTester From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 245 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (6 years 7 months 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 14901 times:

How about non-Boeing/Airbus and/or historical aircraft? I have a lot of aircraft specific books, specifically about the 747SP, BAC One-Eleven, Convair 880 & 990, DC-9, MD-80, and a few others... and they usually contain this information. But it'd be really useful to have like a database that contains this.

I noticed that on sites that do contain a lot of aircraft specs, like Wikipedia and even Airliners.net spec database, fuel capacity is always absent. Why is this?



...said Dan jubilantly.
User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6428 posts, RR: 3
Reply 5, posted (6 years 7 months 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 14898 times:



Quoting PillowTester (Reply 4):

I noticed that on sites that do contain a lot of aircraft specs, like Wikipedia and even Airliners.net spec database, fuel capacity is always absent. Why is this?

Probably because there are so many customer options with both tank capacities and the aircraft's maximum gross weight that it might be hard to come up with a truly representative number.

Even if you did know the ultimate fuel capacity, that might not be helpful, because if you fill the tanks all the way up, the bird can rarely take off with a full passenger load. The rule of thumb is that airliners usually have a lot more fuel storage capacity than they can truly use in normal usage...



Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17173 posts, RR: 66
Reply 6, posted (6 years 7 months 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 14886 times:



Quoting KELPkid (Reply 5):
Even if you did know the ultimate fuel capacity, that might not be helpful, because if you fill the tanks all the way up, the bird can rarely take off with a full passenger load. The rule of thumb is that airliners usually have a lot more fuel storage capacity than they can truly use in normal usage...

Typically with a full fuel load the aircraft can NEVER take off with a full pax load.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offline474218 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 6340 posts, RR: 9
Reply 7, posted (6 years 7 months 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 14900 times:



Quoting PillowTester (Reply 4):
How about non-Boeing/Airbus and/or historical aircraft? I have a lot of aircraft specific books, specifically about the 747SP, BAC One-Eleven, Convair 880 & 990, DC-9, MD-80, and a few others... and they usually contain this information. But it'd be really useful to have like a database that contains this.

Here are a few, fuel weight is based on 6.7 lbs per gallon:

747-200B, 361,700 lbs.
DC-10-10, 178,534 lbs.
DC-10-30, 254,700 lbs.
A300B4-200,108,020 lbs.
A300B4-600, 118,390 lbs.
A310-202, 94,800 lbs.
757-200, 78,658 lbs.
767-200, 104,252 lbs.
767-300, 127,300 lbs.
707-320B, 159,898 lbs.
727-200, 70.920 lbs.
737-200, 34,572 lbs.
737-300, 35,912 lbs.
DC-8-55, 156,733 lbs.
DC-8-73, 162,643 lbs.
L-1011-1, 159,560 lbs.
L-1011-200, 178,360 lbs.
L-1011-500, 213,640 lbs.
DC-9-10, 24,273 lbs.
DC-9-50, 28,596 lbs.
DC9-80, 38,725 lbs.


User currently offlineFlyUSCG From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 656 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (6 years 7 months 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 14881 times:

Dash8-100/300 is 5,678lbs. I assume the -200 is the same and not totally sure for the -400.


Go Trojans! Fight On!
User currently offlinePillowTester From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 245 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (6 years 7 months 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 14871 times:



Quoting 474218 (Reply 7):
Here are a few, fuel weight is based on 6.7 lbs per gallon:

747-200B, 361,700 lbs.
DC-10-10, 178,534 lbs.
DC-10-30, 254,700 lbs.
A300B4-200,108,020 lbs.
A300B4-600, 118,390 lbs.
A310-202, 94,800 lbs.
757-200, 78,658 lbs.
767-200, 104,252 lbs.
767-300, 127,300 lbs.
707-320B, 159,898 lbs.
727-200, 70.920 lbs.
737-200, 34,572 lbs.
737-300, 35,912 lbs.
DC-8-55, 156,733 lbs.
DC-8-73, 162,643 lbs.
L-1011-1, 159,560 lbs.
L-1011-200, 178,360 lbs.
L-1011-500, 213,640 lbs.
DC-9-10, 24,273 lbs.
DC-9-50, 28,596 lbs.
DC9-80, 38,725 lbs.

Wow thanks that is an incredibly helpful list!



...said Dan jubilantly.
User currently offlineMax Q From United States of America, joined May 2001, 4780 posts, RR: 19
Reply 10, posted (6 years 7 months 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 14821 times:

Those numbers do not agree with the 767 and 727 aircraft I have flown.

For our 767-200 /400 - ER models total capacity is 160,000 lbs +

And our 727-200's had a capacity of 54000 lbs.



The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.
User currently offlineFlyUSCG From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 656 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (6 years 7 months 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 14796 times:



Quoting Max Q (Reply 10):
Those numbers do not agree with the 767 and 727 aircraft I have flown

They also do not agree with Boeings official website

Here are the corrected numbers directly from the Boeing website:

DC-9-15: 24,743
DC-9-51: 24,649
DC-10-10: 145,202
DC-10-30: 245,568
707-320B: 159,828
727-200, 54,846 & 65,700
737-200: 23,182 to 34,572
737-300: 35,584
747-200: 351,150 (with CF6-50E2: 348,635)
747-300: 327,000 (with CF6-50E2: 324,480)
747-400: 360,226 (382,336-GE/383,810-RR&PW with tail fuel)
747-400ER: 425,182 (423,708-GE)
747SP: 326,622 (with CF6-45A2/B2: 334,870; with RB211-524C2: 337,410)
757-200: 75,550
757-300: 76,980
767-200/-400ER: 161,738
767-300ER: 161,740

Quoting PillowTester (Thread starter):
I'd like to find a list of different airliners and their fuel capacities, for a research project. Is there somewhere I can find this information?

But anyway, here is the link to where I found it all. knock yourself out!
http://www.boeing.com/commercial/airports/plan_manuals.html



Go Trojans! Fight On!
User currently offline474218 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 6340 posts, RR: 9
Reply 12, posted (6 years 7 months 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 14731 times:



Quoting Max Q (Reply 10):
Those numbers do not agree with the 767 and 727 aircraft I have flown.

The fuel capacities I provided were taken from 1981 Lockheed sale brochure and were correct at the time it was published. The brochure was published over 27 years ago, at that time there were no 747-400, 757-300 or 767-300's.

Quoting FlyUSCG (Reply 11):
Here are the corrected numbers directly from the Boeing website:



Quoting FlyUSCG (Reply 11):
But anyway, here is the link to where I found it all. knock yourself out!
http://www.boeing.com/commercial/air....html

However, the numbers listed in the above Boeing manuals is for USABLE fuel not maximum fuel capacity.


User currently offlineCoolGuy From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 414 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (6 years 7 months 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 14632 times:



Quoting 474218 (Reply 12):
However, the numbers listed in the above Boeing manuals is for USABLE fuel not maximum fuel capacity.

I'm just curious, what's the difference between the two?


User currently offlineWILCO737 From Greenland, joined Jun 2004, 9118 posts, RR: 76
Reply 14, posted (6 years 7 months 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 14627 times:
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HEAD MODERATOR



Quoting CoolGuy (Reply 13):
I'm just curious, what's the difference between the two?

Usable fuel - as the name says - is the fuel you can actually use. But there is always a little rest somewhere in the feeding lines and at the bottom of the tank which cannot be used. On the MD11F we have a procedure when low on fuel that we can drain this "unuseable" fuel out of the lines and send it to the engines...

WILCO737 (MD11F)
 airplane 



It it's not Boeing, I am not going.
User currently offline474218 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 6340 posts, RR: 9
Reply 15, posted (6 years 7 months 2 days ago) and read 14594 times:



Quoting CoolGuy (Reply 13):
I'm just curious, what's the difference between the two?



Quoting WILCO737 (Reply 14):
Usable fuel - as the name says - is the fuel you can actually use.

Aircraft fuel tanks are not smooth inside, there are stringers, webs and bulkheads inside the tanks. Additionally the boost pump are located in something called a surge box (tank), a structure that keeps the fuel around the pump from splashing about so it can be pulled in to the pump smoothly. Fuel gets trapped around all these structural parts and does not flow in to the surge box, therefore it is unusable.

When work is required inside the tanks the first thing done is to de-fuel the aircraft, then the tanks sump drains are opened and allowed to drain and finally someone has to go into the tanks and either suck the trapped fuel out with a vacuum or blot it up with rags.


User currently offlineCRJ900 From Norway, joined Jun 2004, 2234 posts, RR: 1
Reply 16, posted (6 years 7 months 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 14587 times:
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Is there a lot of difference between usable fuel load and max fuel load? Like, 10,000 kgs of max fuel means 9,000 kgs of usable fuel or is it only like 100-200 kgs difference? Or does it vary much depending on aircraft type?


Come, fly the prevailing winds with me
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17173 posts, RR: 66
Reply 17, posted (6 years 7 months 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 14560 times:



Quoting CRJ900 (Reply 16):
Is there a lot of difference between usable fuel load and max fuel load? Like, 10,000 kgs of max fuel means 9,000 kgs of usable fuel or is it only like 100-200 kgs difference? Or does it vary much depending on aircraft type?

It's not 10% no. But it is probably 1-2%. Nor sure actually.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineTdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 80
Reply 18, posted (6 years 7 months 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 14546 times:



Quoting CRJ900 (Reply 16):
Is there a lot of difference between usable fuel load and max fuel load? Like, 10,000 kgs of max fuel means 9,000 kgs of usable fuel or is it only like 100-200 kgs difference? Or does it vary much depending on aircraft type?

Manufacturers try to minimize unusable fuel (it's a useless weight penalty). On a 737 it's on the order of a few hundred points (much less than 1%). It would be similar on most Boeing twins, I suspect. More complex aircraft (quads, Airbii) will have larger unusable reserves because of the larger number of tanks.

Tom.


User currently offline411A From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 1826 posts, RR: 8
Reply 19, posted (6 years 7 months 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 14537 times:

I would strongly suggest that most pay attention to what 474218 has to say, for he is most correct, with his numbers.

Others?
Mostly guessing.

Also, please note that the B707-320 series was the FIRST civil jet transport that could carry more usable fuel than its empty weight.

A fact.


User currently offlineGolfOscarDelta From India, joined Feb 2008, 169 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (6 years 7 months 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 14491 times:



Quoting WILCO737 (Reply 14):
On the MD11F we have a procedure when low on fuel that we can drain this "unuseable" fuel out of the lines and send it to the engines

Hmmm.. i thought unusable fuel was just that ..well unusable... i thought the only way to drain the unsuable fuel was to

Quoting 474218 (Reply 15):
to de-fuel the aircraft, then the tanks sump drains are opened and allowed to drain and finally someone has to go into the tanks and either suck the trapped fuel out with a vacuum or blot it up with rags.

anyway just curious to know, How do you drain the unsuable fuel and send it to the engines?

The reason i ask is : if this could be done then why not do it always and eliminate the whole "trapped-fuel-and-oil" weight fraction thing while desiging aircraft....


User currently offlineWILCO737 From Greenland, joined Jun 2004, 9118 posts, RR: 76
Reply 21, posted (6 years 7 months 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 14489 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
HEAD MODERATOR



Quoting GolfOscarDelta (Reply 20):
Hmmm.. i thought unusable fuel was just that ..well unusable... i thought the only way to drain the unsuable fuel was to

Under normal conditions this fuel in the fuel lines to the engines isn't usable. But on the MD11F there is a feature to get those 100-200kg out of the fuel lines to the engines. but the fuel which is in the tanks where you cannot get to because of the location of the boost pumps: this remains unusable...

WILCO737 (MD11F)
 airplane 



It it's not Boeing, I am not going.
User currently offlineGolfOscarDelta From India, joined Feb 2008, 169 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (6 years 7 months 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 14484 times:



Quoting WILCO737 (Reply 21):
But on the MD11F there is a feature to get those 100-200kg out of the fuel lines to the engines

Hmmm...ok. But again wouldnt this lead to air locks and would you have to drain out all the fuel and do some sort of priming to ge the lines full with fuel (with no air pockets/locks) once you are back on the gorund i.e. like the way you do in diesel cars when all the fuel is drained from the lines (i dunno but for some reason you dont need to do it to petrol cars, only diesels)


User currently offlineWILCO737 From Greenland, joined Jun 2004, 9118 posts, RR: 76
Reply 23, posted (6 years 7 months 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 14480 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
HEAD MODERATOR



Quoting GolfOscarDelta (Reply 22):
Hmmm...ok. But again wouldnt this lead to air locks and would you have to drain out all the fuel and do some sort of priming to ge the lines full with fuel (with no air pockets/locks) once you are back on the gorund i.e. like the way you do in diesel cars when all the fuel is drained from the lines (i dunno but for some reason you dont need to do it to petrol cars, only diesels)

This procedure is only used to get the very last drop of fuel out of the fuel lines. So only if you don't have any fuel on board anymore. Only then you use that procedure and once the fuel is drained out of the fuel lines: the engines will quit because they don't get any fuel anymore. IF we make it safely on the groud then, I must admit: I don't know what maintenance will do, but I will only be glad to be on the ground.

WILCO737 (MD11F)
 airplane 



It it's not Boeing, I am not going.
User currently offlineTristarSteve From Sweden, joined Nov 2005, 4068 posts, RR: 33
Reply 24, posted (6 years 7 months 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 14472 times:



Quoting CRJ900 (Reply 16):
Is there a lot of difference between usable fuel load and max fuel load? Like, 10,000 kgs of max fuel means 9,000 kgs of usable fuel or is it only like 100-200 kgs difference? Or does it vary much depending on aircraft type?

When we defuel a B737, we turn on the wing boost pumps and open the defuel valve and the fuel is pumped out into the bowser. When the boost pump low pressure lights come on steady, we turn the pumps off. The remaining fuel in the tank is unuseable. We then get a drain cart and place it under the sump drains, and open the drains until it stops dripping. We probably get around 20 gallons from each tank. This is more than the unuseable fuel because if the aircraft was flying it would be pitching and rolling and a lot of this fuel would go into the boost pumps. So unuseable fuel is no more than a few gallons per tank. But there is still small puddles of fuel here and there in the tanks. Not very much but enough to make the smell overpowering inside the tank!


25 Miller22 : Probably the most standardized information on all fuel capacities offered for each aircraft will come from the FAA (or CAA). Go to their website, and
26 LongHauler : This is a tough question, mainly as many have said above, it really depends on Customer preference. The best example is when I started flying the B737
27 Post contains images Vc10 : There was a request for fuel information for aircraft other than Boeing or Airbus Concorde fuel capacity was 26400 imp gals [ nominal 95568 kgs ] carr
28 Pliersinsight : Was that because having a tank numbered "13" would be.....unlucky?
29 VC10 : I have often thought the same, but It would seem a tradition that British aircraft always had "A" tanks, which I understand stood for "Auxiliary" but
30 Thegeek : What about for an A333? I calculate there is room for 2t of cargo if full of fuel, and a full 3 class pax load. OEW: 124.5t pax/bags: 29.5t full fuel
31 Larshjort : I know it's not an airliner but it's the only thing I got the numbers on. The F-16A has a max fuel load of about 6800 lb when we defuel on the ground
32 CRJ900 : Are fully stocked galleys part of Operating Empty Weight? Apart from the physical galley structure, food/drink/duty free/china and glassware can weigh
33 Brons2 : 777-200LR
34 Max Q : VC10, what a great aircraft, rode on it a few times in another life. The only aircraft I know of that had a fuel tank in the (vertical) fin.
35 LAX25R : Why the difference among 747-400 with the tail tank between engine types? Where is this extra 500 pounts of fuel going?
36 Starlionblue : Perhaps because the engines have different weight? Fair enough.
37 CcrlR : There are different types weight for an aircraft. Zero fuel weight is maximum weight permissible which includes pax, crew, and cargo without fuel Emp
38 Miller22 : The answer is yes they do. In fact OEW even counts in flight crew and their bags. The problem with OEW is that there is no prescribed OEW for a given
39 TristarSteve : Thanks, I was having trouble with OEW because we don't use it in daily ops. We have Basic weight. This is the aircraft ready for service, with no cre
40 FlyUSCG : Without going back to the website and looking at the exact tables, the difference was in the engine type. The tail fuel was the same in all. But with
41 Thegeek : Fair question. I believe they state: "Typical OEW". That's probably based on 2 pilots only. Obviously different airlines have different interior fitt
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