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Why Are B-Checks Obsolete Today?  
User currently offlineNicoEDDF From Germany, joined Jan 2008, 1099 posts, RR: 1
Posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 3226 times:

Hey folks,

searching didn't got me any results (out of stupidness maybe?)

My understanding is, that most of the B-Check work got rendundant because the work is done either

a) by doing small things permanently overnight

or

b) because the quality of A-checks and material and so on improved a good way

or

c) Intervalls of A and C-checks got closer therefore making B-Checks unnecessary.

I know all my explanations could be wrong, therefore big hands for everyone giving me some insight  Smile

regards and thanks in advance

Nico

10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineTdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 80
Reply 1, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 3126 times:



Quoting NicoEDDF (Thread starter):
My understanding is, that most of the B-Check work got rendundant because the work is done either

Letter checks (A, C, and D, as well as B) actually disappeared with the 737NG. Now you can have the maintenance plan rearranged in a multitude of ways to fit your operation. Everything from "Do a little bit every night and that's it until heavy structural checks" to "Don't touch the airplane for several weeks then do a big check".

Tom.


User currently offlineGST From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2008, 930 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 3120 times:

Yeah it does depend from type to type. But no check will be totally obsolete. Whilst there is the potential for things to break, the aircraft operators will help to find them and fix them. they dont want to compromise the astonishing safety record aviation currently has.

User currently offlineLarshjort From Denmark, joined Dec 2007, 1444 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 3110 times:

You split the check so instead of one big check which might take days, you have secveral small checks which can be done overnight with the aircraft flying pax in the day


139, 306, 319, 320, 321, 332, 34A, AN2, AT4, AT5, AT7, 733, 735, 73G, 738, 739, 146, AR1, BH2, CN1, CR2, DH1, DH3, DH4,
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31667 posts, RR: 56
Reply 4, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 3073 times:

Its more Economical to carry out parts of the Higher checks during the lower check Intervals thus reducing the Grounding time during the higher check.

regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineFr8Mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5383 posts, RR: 14
Reply 5, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 3050 times:

It all depends on the operator, the aircraft, the manufacturer, the regulatory authority and the approved maintenance program for that aircraft type. One operator may still do B-checks, while another does not.

We still do them on our DC-8 aircraft, but on no other. We do A-checks on our B747-classic, but not on our other Boeings.

Maintenance programs evolve. We've eliminated D-checks because we've segmented them into our C checks. We've shortened our C check times (certain segments) by incorporating some tasks into our non-major maintenance program.

It's all designed to maintain a high level of safety and reliability while at the same time limiting the expense of keeping the aircraft on the ground for extended periods of time.



When seconds count...the police are minutes away.
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31667 posts, RR: 56
Reply 6, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 2921 times:



Quoting Fr8Mech (Reply 5):
One operator may still do B-checks, while another does not.

Out here Operators of similiar type fleet are encouraged to follow similiar Mx schedules,approved by the regulatory authorities.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineMax Q From United States of America, joined May 2001, 4435 posts, RR: 19
Reply 7, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 2716 times:

How long to do a 'D' check on a 747 Classic these days FR8 Mech ?


The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.
User currently offlineAirframeAS From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 14150 posts, RR: 24
Reply 8, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 2638 times:



Quoting Larshjort (Reply 3):
You split the check so instead of one big check which might take days, you have secveral small checks which can be done overnight with the aircraft flying pax in the day

This is exactly what WN does.



A Safe Flight Begins With Quality Maintenance On The Ground.
User currently offlineFr8Mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5383 posts, RR: 14
Reply 9, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 2580 times:



Quoting Max Q (Reply 7):
How long to do a 'D' check on a 747 Classic these days FR8 Mech

No clue. I seem to recall that PanAm took 30 - 45 days at hangar 19 at JFK, but I worked at 17. Never really got involved in the "D" check.

I'm not sure anyone does a D check on B747 anymore. We do segmented C checks that incorporate D check tasks in the C check.



When seconds count...the police are minutes away.
User currently offlineCX flyboy From Hong Kong, joined Dec 1999, 6597 posts, RR: 55
Reply 10, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 2462 times:



Quoting AirframeAS (Reply 8):
This is exactly what WN does.

...or doesn't do, as the case may be!!

Sorry, couldn't resist!


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