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Chocks On Parked Aircraft  
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31568 posts, RR: 57
Posted (5 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days ago) and read 6008 times:

What are the requirements in terms of numbers on parked aircraft,either with power on,as in transitting aircraft & power off for long halt aircraft out there.

Here its minimum six chocks per Aircraft & of rubberised material.

regds
MEL


Think of the brighter side!
33 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineWILCO737 From Greenland, joined Jun 2004, 8897 posts, RR: 76
Reply 1, posted (5 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days ago) and read 6009 times:
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Quoting HAWK21M (Thread starter):

We only use 4. 2 on the left main gear (rear and front) and 2 on the right main gear (rear and front).

WILCO737 (MD11F)
 airplane 



It it's not Boeing, I am not going.
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31568 posts, RR: 57
Reply 2, posted (5 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days ago) and read 5999 times:



Quoting WILCO737 (Reply 1):
We only use 4. 2 on the left main gear (rear and front) and 2 on the right main gear (rear and front).

I presume you are talking about MD11?
Are these cocks wide enough to cover both Main wheels or just one.
Also why no chocks on the NLG.

regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineWILCO737 From Greenland, joined Jun 2004, 8897 posts, RR: 76
Reply 3, posted (5 years 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 5996 times:
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Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 2):
I presume you are talking about MD11?

 thumbsup 

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 2):
Are these cocks wide enough to cover both Main wheels or just one.

Just the outer ones. One each

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 2):
Also why no chocks on the NLG.

no.

WILCO737 (MD11F)
 airplane 



It it's not Boeing, I am not going.
User currently offlineAogdesk From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 935 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (5 years 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 5960 times:



Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 2):
I presume you are talking about MD11?
Are these cocks wide enough to cover both Main wheels or just one.

Wilco737: I'm soooo disappointed that you didn't take the opportunity to answer "why yes, my cock is wide enough to cover both main wheels on an MD-11".

Or am I just an immature idiot? I think I know the answer to that.......sigh..... Wink


User currently offlineWILCO737 From Greenland, joined Jun 2004, 8897 posts, RR: 76
Reply 5, posted (5 years 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 5959 times:
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Quoting Aogdesk (Reply 4):
Wilco737: I'm soooo disappointed that you didn't take the opportunity to answer "why yes, my cock is wide enough to cover both main wheels on an MD-11".

 rotfl  I didn't even see that typo! but indeed a good one  Wink  bigthumbsup 

WILCO737 (MD11F)
 airplane 



It it's not Boeing, I am not going.
User currently offlineFr8Mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5095 posts, RR: 12
Reply 6, posted (5 years 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 5944 times:

Typically, you don't want to chock the nose gear or center gear on an MD11 or DC10. As the aircraft loads and fuels, the nose and center gears will walk forward because of their geometry. Any forward canted gear will walk as the aircraft gets heavier.

The number of chocks installed is usually a matter of company policy.



When seconds count...the police are minutes away. Never leave your cave without your club.
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31568 posts, RR: 57
Reply 7, posted (5 years 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 5903 times:



Quoting WILCO737 (Reply 5):
I didn't even see that typo! but indeed a good one

Hey I did not notice that typo too.... Guess we are getting serious on this forum.  Smile

Quoting Fr8Mech (Reply 6):

Typically, you don't want to chock the nose gear or center gear on an MD11 or DC10. As the aircraft loads and fuels, the nose and center gears will walk forward because of their geometry. Any forward canted gear will walk as the aircraft gets heavier.

On the B752 we use the NLG chocks & keep a space forward & aft of the chocks for such events.The AMM states ideal 6 inches spacings ,which is quite a lot.

Also some operators use Towbarless Tugs that grip the NLG,so could that be a reason,if the Tug is already attached.

regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineFr8Mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5095 posts, RR: 12
Reply 8, posted (5 years 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 5812 times:



Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 7):
On the B752 we use the NLG chocks & keep a space forward & aft of the chocks for such events.The AMM states ideal 6 inches spacings ,which is quite a lot.

We use 2" on all chocks. We do chock the nose and center but use 6 ". Other operators choose not to chock to avoid the issue all together.

The B757, and all straight leg gear, should not walk during load/unload operations.



When seconds count...the police are minutes away. Never leave your cave without your club.
User currently offlineAirTran737 From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 3689 posts, RR: 12
Reply 9, posted (5 years 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 5775 times:
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We (WO) chock the nose, and the mains. Nothing on the middle gear.



filler



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User currently offlineJoseKMLB From United States of America, joined May 2008, 493 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (5 years 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 5711 times:

We use 4 for the mains on the MD-88 and one long one for the nose. On the CRJ 4 for the mains and 2 for the nose. On the A320 4 for the mains and 2 for the nose.

User currently offlineAirframeAS From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 14150 posts, RR: 25
Reply 11, posted (5 years 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 5705 times:

How are planes chocked when doing high power engine runs? Are they all chocked?


A Safe Flight Begins With Quality Maintenance On The Ground.
User currently offlineVikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 9393 posts, RR: 27
Reply 12, posted (5 years 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 5672 times:
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Quoting Fr8Mech (Reply 6):
Typically, you don't want to chock the nose gear or center gear on an MD11 or DC10. As the aircraft loads and fuels, the nose and center gears will walk forward because of their geometry. Any forward canted gear will walk as the aircraft gets heavier.

Do you mean that the nose gear and center main gear on the DC-10 and MD-11 are not vertical when extended? Out of curiousity, is there a particular reason for this?

Quoting Aogdesk (Reply 4):
Or am I just an immature idiot? I think I know the answer to that.......sigh....

Nothing wrong with a mind in the gutter. I spotted that typo as soon as I read the reply, and would have commented on it had it not already been brought up  Smile



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
User currently offlineJetMech From Australia, joined Mar 2006, 2635 posts, RR: 53
Reply 13, posted (5 years 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 5662 times:



Quoting Vikkyvik (Reply 12):
Do you mean that the nose gear and center main gear on the DC-10 and MD-11 are not vertical when extended? Out of curiousity, is there a particular reason for this?

The MD-11 nose gear is canted forward a few degrees, as shown below.


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Jerry Pang



I believe that the reason for canting the nose leg forward, would most probably be related to the need to provide a self centering function for the nose-wheel steering. Canting the nose-leg achieves a similar outcome to the rake and trail geometry used on motorbikes.

Because the projected axis of the nose-leg upon the ground is forward of the tire contact point, there exists a couple which tends to return the nose-wheels to the straight ahead position if they are displaced.

Aircraft such as the A330 / A340, and B747 have nose-legs that are vertical. The self centering function is achieved in these cases, by having the centre-line of the axle a certain distance behind the centre-line of the nose leg. This arrangement acts like a shopping trolley castor to provide the self centering function. You can see from the picture below, that the nosewheel axle of the 747 is located several inches behind the axis of the strut.


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Willem Honders



Regards, JetMech



JetMech split the back of his pants. He can feel the wind in his hair.
User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29690 posts, RR: 59
Reply 14, posted (5 years 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 5640 times:



Quoting HAWK21M (Thread starter):
What are the requirements in terms of numbers on parked aircraft,either with power on,as in transitting aircraft & power off for long halt aircraft out there.

Depends on who I was working for at the time.

Alaska it was the port maingear that got the chock.
At Reeve we just would chock the NG for a flight.
If it was an RON flight all three wheels
At FS We would chock one of the mains. Usually the port side on the lears and the Casa and the port main on the metro because on one of ours the power cord plugged in there.
If we knew the weather was going to be bad overnight we would do both mains.



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User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31568 posts, RR: 57
Reply 15, posted (5 years 9 months 3 weeks 4 days ago) and read 5630 times:



Quoting Fr8Mech (Reply 8):
The B757, and all straight leg gear, should not walk during load/unload operations.

At Transitting Aircraft,We keep the Parking brake set too,in addition to the Six chocks.

Quoting AirframeAS (Reply 11):

How are planes chocked when doing high power engine runs? Are they all chocked?

Out here for High power runs only the NLG is chocked,& no one on ground around till thrust levers brought back to Idle.

regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineAirframeAS From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 14150 posts, RR: 25
Reply 16, posted (5 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 5589 times:



Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 15):
Out here for High power runs only the NLG is chocked...

Same at AS, I just wondered how other airlines do it. When I was there, we used HUGE chocks with metal chain linkages to ensure that the chocks don't get sucked into the intake.

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 15):
....& no one on ground around till thrust levers brought back to Idle.

We have had guys outside on high power runs, just about 100 feet from the aircraft or so with headsets on.



A Safe Flight Begins With Quality Maintenance On The Ground.
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31568 posts, RR: 57
Reply 17, posted (5 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 5563 times:



Quoting AirframeAS (Reply 16):
We have had guys outside on high power runs, just about 100 feet from the aircraft or so with headsets on.

Risk of permanant ear damage is the minor risk here. Smile
Not advisable.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineRoseFlyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 9375 posts, RR: 52
Reply 18, posted (5 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 5548 times:



Quoting JetMech (Reply 13):

I believe that the reason for canting the nose leg forward, would most probably be related to the need to provide a self centering function for the nose-wheel steering. Canting the nose-leg achieves a similar outcome to the rake and trail geometry used on motorbikes.

Because the projected axis of the nose-leg upon the ground is forward of the tire contact point, there exists a couple which tends to return the nose-wheels to the straight ahead position if they are displaced.

You are exactly right. As someone who works on designing the steering system of a plane, caster is very important. If you lose steering capability and have to steer only with the rudder (high speed) or differential braking (low speed), you need caster in the front wheel. That allows it to naturally center, or follow the plane in a turn. If it didn't have caster, then it might be tempted to rotate on its own, which would cause major steering problems.

On most planes, it is done by having the nose gear angled forward and locating the axis of the wheels behind the line of axis through the nose gear axis. If that sounds confusing, just look at a bicycle because they are all made with caster. The wheel is not in line with the axis of the strut.



If you have never designed an airplane part before, let the real designers do the work!
User currently offlineFr8mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5095 posts, RR: 12
Reply 19, posted (5 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 5525 times:



Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 15):
At Transitting Aircraft,We keep the Parking brake set too,in addition to the Six chocks

Brakes are always off after chocking. Reduces the heat stress on the brakes.

We rarley chock during high power runs and never have a person on the headset during high power. We use fuel for ballast as recommended in the AMM.



When seconds count...the police are minutes away. Never leave your cave without your club.
User currently offlineKingAir200 From United States of America, joined May 2006, 1605 posts, RR: 2
Reply 20, posted (5 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 5491 times:

We always chock the nose and both mains on 319/320s and DC-9-30s. We only chock the mains on DC-9-40s and -50s because of the spray deflector on the nose gear. On CRJ turns, we'll chock the nose gear and the right main gear. For terminators, we chock all three.


Hey Swifty
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31568 posts, RR: 57
Reply 21, posted (5 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 5441 times:



Quoting Fr8mech (Reply 19):
Brakes are always off after chocking. Reduces the heat stress on the brakes.

On our B752SFs & B752PCFs.since the EICAS status screen does show the Brake temperature,its normally monitored & Parking brakes are set,though Hydraulics are switched off unless there is strong winds around.

Loading & Unloading operations on B752 freighters does cause mvmt of the Aircraft along the longutional axis & to a lesser degree vertically.having the parking brakes set along with the Six chocks does help.

regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineFr8Mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5095 posts, RR: 12
Reply 22, posted (5 years 9 months 3 weeks 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 5389 times:



Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 21):
On our B752SFs & B752PCFs.since the EICAS status screen does show the Brake temperature,its normally monitored & Parking brakes are set,though Hydraulics are switched off unless there is strong winds around.

So you put someone on the flight deck to monitor the brake temps? The problem isn't so much the temperature as the possibility that the heat stack fuse or warp when it's under pressure and cooling after a stop.

We don't have brake temp installed on our B757's.



When seconds count...the police are minutes away. Never leave your cave without your club.
User currently offlineTristarSteve From Sweden, joined Nov 2005, 3930 posts, RR: 34
Reply 23, posted (5 years 9 months 3 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 5381 times:



Quoting Fr8Mech (Reply 22):
So you put someone on the flight deck to monitor the brake temps? The problem isn't so much the temperature as the possibility that the heat stack fuse or warp when it's under pressure and cooling after a stop.

About 5 years ago British Airways standardised the procedure on all their aircraft. The brakes stay on all the time. Both main gears are chocked fore and aft. We don't chock the nose because we normally use TBLs and it can be embarrassing if the NLG chock gets stuck!
On an overnight the NLG is chocked as well because on Boeing aircraft the park brake pressure bleeds away slowly and can be zero after 10 hours. Airbus don't have this problem because of a different park brake hyd set up.
When I have a B757 nightstopping, and high winds forecast, I try and park a TBL on the nosegear. (We only have two nightstops).


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31568 posts, RR: 57
Reply 24, posted (5 years 9 months 3 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 5317 times:



Quoting Fr8Mech (Reply 22):
So you put someone on the flight deck to monitor the brake temps

The brakes if warm on arrival is very noticable & parking brake can be switched off.
As mentioned Hyds are off unless there are strong winds around.

Quoting Fr8Mech (Reply 22):
We don't have brake temp installed on our B757's.

Its a customer option.I sure would like our EICAS screens to display wheel pressure though  Smile

Quoting TristarSteve (Reply 23):
On an overnight the NLG is chocked as well because on Boeing aircraft the park brake pressure bleeds away slowly and can be zero after 10 hours.

We normally carry out a reset every 8 hrs if needed.

regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
25 KBFIspotter : At QX, the NLG on the Dash-8 gets chocked during normal turns at the gate, and the CRJ gets a MLG chocked. All wheels get chocked as well if we have t
26 BAe146QT : For completeness, this is usually referred to as "caster angle" (in the UK at least) and absolutely has the effect of forcing a self-centering moment
27 AirframeAS : True, it was still done at AS. Everyone wore earplugs with the earmuffs.
28 CX flyboy : I have seen metal-frame type chocks used on my 777 as well as wooden blocks in addition to the rubberised type. There are usually chocks infront and b
29 HAWK21M : From the list of Wooden,Metal & rubber....The rubber chocks would be most effective grip wise. wooden chocks would be used for lighter aircraft. regds
30 Wn676 : For our high power runs we have these huge orange things that kind of look like the thing they use to jack race cars up during pit stops. They're shap
31 HAWK21M : Any picture available? regds MEL.
32 FlyASAGuy2005 : With us (ASA) its SOP to have two on the left main and two on the nose. If the a/c is RON or there is no crew on board at the time and the door is to
33 HAWK21M : Whats the status of the Parking brake at this time. regds MEL
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