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Why Is There Different Parking Stops For Aircraft?  
User currently offlineGrimey From Ireland, joined Jun 2005, 453 posts, RR: 5
Posted (6 years 2 months 1 week 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 4328 times:

I have been at a few airports recently and I have noticed that at each gate there is a line in which the aircraft must get in line with. The one thing that got my eye is that there are different points at which different aircraft must stop their front wheels at and what even got me more was that at the same gate there was different parking points for a B772 and B773. There was only a few feet in the overall distance of these points.

The question is why dont they have the one point for all aircraft? what happens if an aircraft parks on the wrong spot? what happens if the marshall directs the aircraft to the wrong spot, does he get in trouble?

It could have something to do with jetways that are connected to the airport building, but they are manually operated.

8 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently onlineGoldenshield From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 6041 posts, RR: 14
Reply 1, posted (6 years 2 months 1 week 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 4292 times:

Mainly, the stop marks are there to ensure that the aircraft fits within the stand itself without hindering other operations, and that the jetway can reach the aircraft within its range of movement. In airports without jetways, only the first reason applies.

[Edited 2008-07-13 09:21:52]


Two all beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun.
User currently offlineMayor From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 10434 posts, RR: 14
Reply 2, posted (6 years 2 months 1 week 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 4292 times:

It has to do with the relationship between the placement of the nosegear and the boarding door.
If the agent parks it in the wrong place, he may not get in trouble BUT at that point, the a/c will have to be connected to the towbar and tow tractor and pushed or towed to the right spot. It's not always the agent's fault sometimes. I've noticed when parking a/c that some pilots have a very slow reaction time. If they're coming into the gate too fast, I've stopped them short and have them started again, slowly. I actually think it was easier to park them with hand signals, most of the time.



"A committee is a group of the unprepared, appointed by the unwilling, to do the unnecessary"----Fred Allen
User currently offlineFlyMIA From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 7176 posts, RR: 9
Reply 3, posted (6 years 2 months 1 week 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 4252 times:

As said above it is to make sure the airplane is in the right spot so the jetway can pull up to the correct door.
Funny story, while waiting for a flight out of IAD I noticed a AA MD-80 come up to a gate but no one was there to marshall it in. So this young lady who was working baggage I think picked up the sticks and marshalled the MD-80 in. The only problem was she told it to stop at the 738 line. So a supervisor looking person noticed this and seemed pretty mad. The pilot had to restart an engine and move forward about 10 feet. Funny that this lady thought a MD-80 was a 738.  Smile



"It was just four of us on the flight deck, trying to do our job" (Captain Al Haynes)
User currently offlineLeezyjet From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 4042 posts, RR: 53
Reply 4, posted (6 years 2 months 1 week 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 4189 times:

It also ensures that the wings are in the right place in relation to the underground fuel hydrants (at those airports which have them), as the fuel trucks only have a certain length of hose to be able to connect between the ground hydrant and the a/c - when the A346 first came into service this caused a few problems as some of the fuel trucks had shorter fuel lines than the others and couldn't reach !!.

Also not all jetways are fully moveable on wheels, quite alot can only go forward and backward and up and down on rails, these type require the a/c to be parked on the correct spot otherwise the cabin door won't be aligned correctly and may not open properly.

 Smile



"She Rolls, 45 knots, 90, 135, nose comes up to 20 degrees, she's airborne - She flies, Concorde Flies"
User currently offlineCosmicCruiser From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 2255 posts, RR: 15
Reply 5, posted (6 years 2 months 1 week 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 4147 times:

For us it also means having the nose gear at the nose tether spot.

User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 6, posted (6 years 2 months 1 week 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 4005 times:

Depends on the location of the bay/gate.
To enable correct positioning of the Aerobridge,mantain adequate Aircraft to bay/equipment clearences & clear area aft of the Aircraft.

The Marshaller is responsible to ensure the Aircraft is signalled to stop at the correct spot.

regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineMayor From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 10434 posts, RR: 14
Reply 7, posted (6 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 3801 times:



Quoting FlyMIA (Reply 3):
Funny story, while waiting for a flight out of IAD I noticed a AA MD-80 come up to a gate but no one was there to marshall it in. So this young lady who was working baggage I think picked up the sticks and marshalled the MD-80 in. The only problem was she told it to stop at the 738 line. So a supervisor looking person noticed this and seemed pretty mad. The pilot had to restart an engine and move forward about 10 feet. Funny that this lady thought a MD-80 was a 738.

The MD-80/90 is very critical of where it is parked so the front door will open properly AND so the jetway won't strike any of the sensors near the front door.



"A committee is a group of the unprepared, appointed by the unwilling, to do the unnecessary"----Fred Allen
User currently offlineDeltaGuy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (6 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 3717 times:

I remember my olden days of ramping, the spot had "757" labeled on the lead-in line, so naturally I marshalled the Capt to park there...so he executes a nice stop. All the other rampers started screaming at me, pointing to the "767" line...finally the supervisor motions to it, at which point I had to motion the Capt to move forward 3'...the look on his face was "wtf".

At the end of the day, it was just the fact that the knucklehead rampers always grouped the 75 and 76 together, and no one bothered to re-paint the new positions from some time ago.

DeltaGuy


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