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Where Are The Six Pieces Of Wood In A 727?  
User currently offlineFalstaff From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 6098 posts, RR: 28
Posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 15149 times:
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I was reading an article about flying the 727 in the new issue of Airways and there was a mention of there being six pieces of wood in a 727. Where are the pieces of wood and what are they used for? Do other modern jetliners have any wooden parts?


My mug slaketh over on Falstaff N503
53 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineTdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 79
Reply 1, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 15066 times:



Quoting Falstaff (Thread starter):
I was reading an article about flying the 727 in the new issue of Airways and there was a mention of there being six pieces of wood in a 727. Where are the pieces of wood and what are they used for?

I have no idea, but I'd strongly suspect there's at least some balsa-core composite somewhere in there.

Tom.


User currently offlineDeltaGuy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 14977 times:

Flight Engineer's table! Big grin

DeltaGuy


User currently offlineWedgetail737 From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 5910 posts, RR: 6
Reply 3, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 14985 times:
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Sometimes there would be plywood in the cargo bay.

Some of the older floor panels were made from two sheets of aluminum, with a balsa wood core.


User currently offlineRampkontroler From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 859 posts, RR: 6
Reply 4, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 14960 times:

The article reads:

"There is no better way to learn systems and procedures than instructing. But it's important to remember that just because you know the thread diameter and metallurgy of the four bolts that secure the engines to the fuselage, your students don't. Jokingly inquiring about the only letter that doesn't appear on a factory-stamped engineer's panel, or how many pieces of wood there are on a 727 is fine. But we've all suffered through instructors who lecture simply to hear themselves speak."

I assume that's the wood reference you were talking about, and I would like to know the answer as well. All I can picture is maybe a dowel inside of some tubing somewhere, if indeed he wasn't just joking!


User currently offlineCAL764 From United States of America, joined May 2008, 377 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 14946 times:



Quoting DeltaGuy (Reply 2):
Flight Engineer's table!

Ya, but a FE would object to anything other than Oak or anything else about 10X heavier than balsa....Would add the smallest amount of glamor, no?



1. Fly to Win 2. Fund Future 3. Reliability 4. Work Together CO: Work Hard, Fly Right...
User currently offlineAcey559 From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 1532 posts, RR: 2
Reply 6, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 14735 times:



Quoting Falstaff (Thread starter):
Do other modern jetliners have any wooden parts?

The bathroom floors on DL planes (including the E170s, I believe) have wood floors!  Smile


User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25308 posts, RR: 22
Reply 7, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 14721 times:



Quoting Acey559 (Reply 6):
Quoting Falstaff (Thread starter):
Do other modern jetliners have any wooden parts?


The bathroom floors on DL planes (including the E170s, I believe) have wood floors!

I doubt it. Possibly wood-grain vinyl floor covering. I've seen that on several aircraft.


User currently offlineAcey559 From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 1532 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 14609 times:



Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 7):
I doubt it. Possibly wood-grain vinyl floor covering. I've seen that on several aircraft.

Right, I was being a little facetious.  Wink


User currently offlineKL808 From United States of America, joined May 1999, 1584 posts, RR: 2
Reply 9, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 14524 times:

If im not mistaken the part under engine number 2 where the aircraft can skid on when it over rotates is made out of wood. I think I read this somewhere that even the original B747's had these.

Drew



AMS-LAX-MNL
User currently offlineAogdesk From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 935 posts, RR: 3
Reply 10, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 14284 times:

Perhaps its between the legs of the captain? (the control column.....get your mind outta the gutter!!!)  Wink

The compressible tail skid on a B727 is definitely NOT made out of wood.....at least all of them that I'm not familiar with.


User currently offlineCritter From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 267 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 14178 times:

If I am not mistaken......I believe that there are several phenolic wood cable guides in the main gear wheel wells. These guides keep the control cables from rubbing and fraying on other metal structures.

critter


User currently offlineRoseFlyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 9637 posts, RR: 52
Reply 12, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 14142 times:



Quoting Aogdesk (Reply 10):
Perhaps its between the legs of the captain? (the control column.....get your mind outta the gutter!!!)

Nope, that's a magnesium casting.



If you have never designed an airplane part before, let the real designers do the work!
User currently offlineSpacecadet From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 3629 posts, RR: 12
Reply 13, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 14102 times:

Come on, everybody knows it's the engine pylons  Smile

Yep, solid basswood!



I'm tired of being a wanna-be league bowler. I wanna be a league bowler!
User currently offlineAcidradio From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 1874 posts, RR: 10
Reply 14, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 14053 times:
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Does the crash axe in the cockpit have a wooden handle? There's one of the 6!


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User currently offline777DEN From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 124 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 14053 times:

nose gear door core
wing fence core x2
FE table top
main gear inspection port covers in cabin x2


 Smile


User currently offlineAogdesk From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 935 posts, RR: 3
Reply 16, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 14051 times:



Quoting RoseFlyer (Reply 12):
Nope, that's a magnesium casting.

Nope.....that was pure sarcasm.... Wink

I was going to go with the phenolic pulleys and fairleads too........and then I remembered that those sturdy JT8 fan blades are made of the finest teak.........seriously.  Wink


User currently offlineKen777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8269 posts, RR: 8
Reply 17, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 14033 times:



Quoting Acidradio (Reply 14):
Does the crash axe in the cockpit have a wooden handle? There's one of the 6!

And maybe the inserts that hold the bathroom tissue roll in place.  Smile


User currently offline777DEN From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 124 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 14027 times:

crash axe is metal handled



aaa


User currently offline777DEN From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 124 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 14028 times:

the list i posted is the common answer, the nose gear doors and wing fences are balse wood cored the other 3 are plywood

User currently offlineCrownvic From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 1912 posts, RR: 5
Reply 20, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 13936 times:

While not on the 727, many years back, I was around a 707-321 that was being broken up in ACY and I found it interesting that on this particular a/c, the entire ventral fin on the aft belly fuselage was mostly made of wood...

User currently offlineYegger From Canada, joined Mar 2004, 69 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 13811 times:

There was a wooden piece that was used to lock the handle of rear cabin door (from the inside) to the rear stairs. This was used so that it was difficult to enter a parked/out of service/overnighting B727 aircraft (you couldn't simply walk up the stairs and go in) from the ground without using a lift truck or other vehicle to access the main doors.

User currently offline727forever From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 793 posts, RR: 5
Reply 22, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 13479 times:



Quoting KL808 (Reply 9):
If im not mistaken the part under engine number 2 where the aircraft can skid on when it over rotates is made out of wood. I think I read this somewhere that even the original B747's had these.

Nope sorry. It was definately metal.

On the door to the fuel dump panel there are two little wooden strips on the inside of the door that when slammed closed push all of the dump switches closed. I can also confirm that the Engineers table top was wood.

That's 3.


727forever



727forever
User currently offlineFrmrCAPCADET From United States of America, joined May 2008, 1718 posts, RR: 1
Reply 23, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 13267 times:

I have seen parts made for a modern fighter made from wood - it appeared to be a spacer to go between several other parts. I am totally guessing as to it function.


Buffet: the airline business...has eaten up capital...like..no other (business)
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 24, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 13178 times:



Quoting Falstaff (Thread starter):
I was reading an article about flying the 727 in the new issue of Airways and there was a mention of there being six pieces of wood in a 727.

Where was this Article printed.
Its tough to believe,considering the Fire resistant capabilities needed for Commercial Airliners.

Only thing could be the Six Chocks for the Three Landing gears if carried on board  Smile
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
25 Jet-lagged : The wood paneling?
26 Hypersonic : Are you implying that there might be Captains out there who have 'got wood' whilst flying? LOL (mind definately in rude mode !!)
27 NEMA : Yep, that was my first thought, i remember early 747 documentaries saying that wooden planks were fitted under the tail area in case of tail end drag
28 Falstaff : The USA, The author had flown as FE, FO, and captain, on Orion, RC, and NW 727s. According to the article the answer to that is "J".
29 Moose135 : I wouldn't be surprised if they attached wooden skid plates during test flights, especially for something like minimum unstick speed tests.
30 HAWK21M : Didn't the Author mention the location.Is there any way the autor could be contacted? regds MEL.
31 SlamClick : well... IF it was actually wood that was used it was only for the VMU tests. I've seen film of Boeing products actually having their tail dragged on
32 Falstaff : He mentioned various locations while flying 727s for RC and NW in the USA.
33 474218 : Wood floorboards would never pass the required "burn thorough test". Will maybe if they were wet with ...
34 EMBQA : Not wood...just a poly laminate look a like.
35 Tdscanuck : They were a lot laxer on the 727 than they are now. Also, things outside the pressurized shell and contained (like landing gear door cores) aren't re
36 HAWK21M : Was an Email/Ctc printed on the Article? I too found it surprising if wood was used on the floor. regds MEL
37 Post contains images Fsnuffer : The pilot and copilot's golf clubs in the hold  [Edited 2008-08-30 07:05:51]
38 Atlturbine : The only thing I know for sure is the main landing gear down lock inspection hole cover in the mid cabin area. I do not recall what kind of wood it wa
39 HAWK21M : Thats true on the B737. regds MEL
40 Starlionblue : Yeah but even woods are made of metal or composite nowadays.
41 Triebwerk : What about the 6 pencils in the cockpit? They're a wood and graphite composite.
42 TWAL1011727 : I was shown the 2 pieces of wood on a Delta MD88. They were on the control columns were they go thru the cockpit floor. It is approximate horseshoe sh
43 Mayor : We had that, too, in SLC but we made it ourselves and it definitely wasn't an actual part of the air craft and wasn't supposed to stay on board, alth
44 EcuadorianMD11 : Tiger Woods + family on a jaunt? Presumably travelling business class........... Ecuadorian MD11
45 CosmicCruiser : I believe there was a piece of wood on the GEN reset panel (if I even remember that correctly) on the aft CB panel for the F/E. I remember this questi
46 JETPILOT : The nose wheel brake consists of 2 blocks of 4X4 wood blocks in the wheel well ceiling. When the gear is retracted the tires rub against the wood bloc
47 ZANL188 : I've had a book since I was a kid called "747 Story of the Boeing SUPER JET" copyright 1970 Latter half of the book describes testing and early servi
48 TimePilot : Does the 727 use wood-burning engines? 6 pieces would be hard for international flights though, I think. What about in the galley, for special smoked
49 HAWK21M : Was the brake snubbing pads of wood.However I thought the B727 had NLG brakes. regds MEL.
50 411A : It's all very simple. The wooden bits were installed on PanAmerican aircraft only (initially, but used later on other aircraft), and on the older airc
51 HAWK21M : What about the Flame retardant/resistant properties of these wood pieces. regds MEL.
52 EcuadorianMD11 : We have a contradiction here..........if Atlturbine is right, then the total number of pieces of wood must be uneven, right? Regardless of the amount
53 HAWK21M : The B737 had a wooden cover for MLG down & locked viewing in flt.Was the B727 similiar? regds MEL.
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