Sponsor Message:
Aviation Technical / Operations Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Why The Gulfstream G 650 Is Not Larger?  
User currently offline747400sp From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 3613 posts, RR: 2
Posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 17186 times:

Gulfstream recently lunch there newest jet the G 650. Now when I herd about it, I thought may be it would be the size of the BBJ, due to the fact it was stated that the G-650 would be wider than the G-550. As a Gulfstream fan, I was disappointed to see it cabin is not much bigger than the G-550. So I wonder, why Gulfstream did not use a bigger plane design to compete with the BBJ for the G-650?



PS: I think Gulfstream build some of the most beautiful plane in the world, it would have been nice if they design something to put the BBJ to shame.

47 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineNjxc500 From United States of America, joined Dec 2007, 240 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 17193 times:

I don't really think the majority of customers for corporate aircraft want bigger airplanes. They put importance in all sorts of things, but I'm not sure there are too many customers that want much bigger than a G5 or Global. Maybe someone can shed some light on typical passenger loads for these airplanes. The Global I know of rarely has more than 4 pax, and they're flying in comfort already. Range and speed are nice, but I'm not sure about much more size.

Also, I think 100,000 lbs. MTOW is a key number for an aircraft, but I can't remember why.

Nick


User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7703 posts, RR: 21
Reply 2, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 17186 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!



Quoting 747400sp (Thread starter):
So I wonder, why Gulfstream did not use a bigger plane design to compete with the BBJ for the G-650?

Because that is not the market they wish to serve in this instance, and it is where their experience and expertise lie. If they saw more potential in a larger plane and thought they had the resources to build one, I'm sure they would. However, they have obviously seen a market for this size and type of jet, and are therefore building it. It's not rocket science. They are good at what they do, and they're in the business to make money.



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7703 posts, RR: 21
Reply 3, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 17186 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!



Quoting Njxc500 (Reply 1):
The Global I know of rarely has more than 4 pax, and they're flying in comfort already. Range and speed are nice, but I'm not sure about much more size.

I've seen maybe half a dozen people maximum on a Global. The most I have seen on a BBJ is 25.



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineDw747400 From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 1260 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 17189 times:



Quoting Njxc500 (Reply 1):
Also, I think 100,000 lbs. MTOW is a key number for an aircraft, but I can't remember why.

It is the maximum allowable takeoff weight out of Teterboro New Jersey (KTEB). That one airport is a VERY big deal for corporate jets, and the inability of BBJs and other jets to get in there has certainly cost Boeing and Airbus in campaigns where the customer would like the extra space, but doesn't need it.

In addition, remember that the G650 isn't simply bigger than a G550; it is faster, has a longer range, and added redundancy. Providing these features without increasing the price TOO MUCH over the G550 also limits the size of the aircraft.

Finally, some people just prefer purpose-built executive jets. When they plop down $70 million, they want to be sure no one mistakes them for a WN jet due for some new paint.



CFI--Certfied Freakin Idiot
User currently offlineAtlturbine From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 158 posts, RR: 14
Reply 5, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 17119 times:



Quoting Dw747400 (Reply 4):
It is the maximum allowable takeoff weight out of Teterboro New Jersey (KTEB). That one airport is a VERY big deal for corporate jets,

Very true...the same applies to many other "general aviation" airports around the country.

The big reason for the G 650's design is the fact that Gulfstream is EXTREMELY responsive to their customers. Gulfstream spent millions of dollars & years of customer surveys to determine exactly what their clients wanted in a corporate jet. Dealing with Gulfstream on any technical or operations issue is truly a pleasure.

I think the 600+ orders placed for this aircraft within the first week of its announced production speaks for itself.



To the World you might be One Person but to One Person you might be the World
User currently offlineDw747400 From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 1260 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 17089 times:



Quoting Atlturbine (Reply 5):
I think the 600+ orders placed for this aircraft within the first week of its announced production speaks for itself.

It says 600 people have way too much money and aren't willing to settle for second best.  duck 



CFI--Certfied Freakin Idiot
User currently offlineAtlturbine From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 158 posts, RR: 14
Reply 7, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 17084 times:



Quoting Dw747400 (Reply 6):
It says 600 people have way too much money and aren't willing to settle for second best

So true...good thing they launched it when they did!! I wonder how many of those orders are in jeopardy due to the current economy? The companies I deal with are still in good shape & not in Washington DC with hat in hand!



To the World you might be One Person but to One Person you might be the World
User currently offlineSEPilot From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 6906 posts, RR: 46
Reply 8, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 17015 times:

It would be silly for Gulfstream to try and compete with the BBJ and Airbus. They are taking a plane (the 737 and A320 families) of which they have already sold thousands and simply putting in custom interiors and tweaking them to give more range instead of payload. The design and certification is already done, and has cost billions. Gulfstream would have to absorb the cost of design and certification over the cost of a few hundred. It just doesn't add up. Gulfstream offers the ultimate in luxury, safety, and performance in a comfortable size for a family or board of directors. They do not offer flying palaces; if that is what you want, go to Boeing or Airbus.


The problem with making things foolproof is that fools are so doggone ingenious...Dan Keebler
User currently offlineRoseFlyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 9633 posts, RR: 52
Reply 9, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 16955 times:

Boeing and Airbus have a huge advantage because they can offer larger airplanes at the same acquisition cost as a Gulfstream and lower support costs. The reason for that is that there are thousands of trained, pilots, mechanics and personnel equipped to service those airplanes. Furthermore, the parts and maintenance networks are established. Boeing and Airbus are also very efficient at producing 737s and A320s since they roll off their production lines daily. Gulfstream and Bombardier can offer a more customized product, but if they attempted to upsize to 737 or A319 size, then they seriously would be at an acquisition cost disadvantage because there is no way they could ever design and build a plane to compete in size with a 737 cost competitively.

737s and A319s are often larger than their customers need as said. They are popular though since they cost about the same to acquire and less to maintain. The slower speeds and double the fuel burn are the penalties taken.



If you have never designed an airplane part before, let the real designers do the work!
User currently offlineSEPilot From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 6906 posts, RR: 46
Reply 10, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 16939 times:

RoseFlyer brings up an excellent point on support and maintenance. I suspect that this is what led Boeing to get into the business in the first place; the knowledge that they could offer a much bigger plane at pretty much the same price as the top end bizjets, and had all of the support in place all around the world. Gulfstream would have to offer something REALLY incredible to overcome that advantage.


The problem with making things foolproof is that fools are so doggone ingenious...Dan Keebler
User currently offline747400sp From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 3613 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 16899 times:



Quoting RoseFlyer (Reply 9):
Gulfstream and Bombardier can offer a more customized product, but if they attempted to upsize to 737 or A319 size, then they seriously would be at an acquisition cost disadvantage because there is no way they could ever design and build a plane to compete in size with a 737 cost competitively.

You can say that about Gulfstream, but Bombardier is coming out with the C series, which is close to a 737 size, and is the size of a 717 , so Bombardier can build a larger VIP jet. Now will they build a VIP jet off the C series, I think they will.


User currently offlineSEPilot From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 6906 posts, RR: 46
Reply 12, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 16879 times:



Quoting 747400sp (Reply 11):

You can say that about Gulfstream, but Bombardier is coming out with the C series, which is close to a 737 size, and is the size of a 717 , so Bombardier can build a larger VIP jet. Now will they build a VIP jet off the C series, I think they will.

No question they could, for the same reason that Boeing and Airbus got into the market. But I wonder whether they would have the necessary appeal. Very, very few people actually have use for a plane the size of an airliner; the Gulfstream offerings are big enough for almost all customers. A private jet based on an airliner offers one thing; over the top size. Bombardier may find itself squeezed into a corner. Those that want the ultimate in speed and luxury will still go for the Gulfstream; those that want a flying palace will still go for Boeing or Airbus. I don't know how big the market for a small airliner based personal jet would be, as it just does not offer anything "ultimate." The one place I can see it fitting in is for a corporation that actually does need to move 20-30 people frequently and are cost conscious. But if they are that cost conscious they will still fly commercial.



The problem with making things foolproof is that fools are so doggone ingenious...Dan Keebler
User currently offlineSJCflyer From United States of America, joined Sep 2004, 11 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 16825 times:



Quoting SEPilot (Reply 12):
The one place I can see it fitting in is for a corporation that actually does need to move 20-30 people frequently and are cost conscious. But if they are that cost conscious they will still fly commercial.

True, the really cost conscious companies will continue to fly commercial. But for those companies that are cost conscious and still need to move 20-50 people frequently, they can opt for a RJ in whatever configuration they need. Intel does this running their ERJ shuttle multiple times a day between Northern and Southern California.


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Ben Wang



I agree that it may fit a cost conscious company that needs to move 20-30 people long-haul on a regular basis. Then a BBJ or ACJ may make more sense.

Quoting SEPilot (Reply 8):
Gulfstream offers the ultimate in luxury, safety, and performance in a comfortable size for a family or board of directors.

I can't speak for every corporation, but I work for a very large, diversified, health care (pharmaceutical, medical device, and nutritional products) company. Our travel policy dictates very strict limits for how many Board Members, Officers, VPs, or even standard employees reporting under one manager can fly on the corporate transports (a mix of G-IVs, Hawker 800XPs, and King Airs) or even on commercial flights. Most of the large companies I've worked for have similar stipulations. It's a disaster clause in the corporate travel policy to ensure business continuity in case of a serious aviation accident.

As a result, I think you will find that there's rarely more than 4-6 passengers on the corporate-owned aircraft of most companies. It's usually 1 or 2 officers of the company, possibly some Presidents or VPs, and their support staff (Admins). Because of this, smaller corporate transports such as Gulfstream and Global Express will always be in higher demand. They're cheaper to operate, have many more airport options, and they're more well-suited to the mission profile of the typical corporate operator.

Just my 2 cents.



Last Trip: SFO-DXB-BLR-DXB-SFO; EK B773ER/A332 C-Class ---- Next Trip: SFO-LHR-BRU-MUC-LHR-SFO; BA/LH 744/A319; C-Class
User currently offlineMD-90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 8507 posts, RR: 12
Reply 14, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 16822 times:



Quoting 747400sp (Thread starter):
Gulfstream recently lunch there newest jet the G 650. Now when I herd about it, I thought may be it would be the size of the BBJ, due to the fact it was stated that the G-650 would be wider than the G-550. As a Gulfstream fan, I was disappointed to see it cabin is not much bigger than the G-550. So I wonder, why Gulfstream did not use a bigger plane design to compete with the BBJ for the G-650?

Not to mention that designing an airplane the size of a BBJ would be crazy expensive for Gulfstream. The 650 is already a very costly project, but a 737-size airframe would be even more costly and Gulfstream couldn't amortize it over 4000 commercial airframes. Plus what demand there is for BBJ-size jets is adequately filled by the BBJs and Airbus CJs.

I read the debut article about it in Flying Magazine and I think Gulfstream has hit an absolute homerun with the 650.


User currently offlineDw747400 From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 1260 posts, RR: 1
Reply 15, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 16820 times:



Quoting SEPilot (Reply 12):
Very, very few people actually have use for a plane the size of an airliner; the Gulfstream offerings are big enough for almost all customers. A private jet based on an airliner offers one thing; over the top size.

There are more than handful out there, but it seems that an increasing number of airliner conversions are hitting the market as well. You already discussed why its tough for Gulfstream to compete on cost with new-build airframes; a mid-life widebody is cheaper still. Even with a $20 million interior, you can still get a 767 for the price of a G550, and when your only putting on 800 hours a year its feasible

Quote:
They're cheaper to operate, have many more airport options, and they're more well-suited to the mission profile of the typical corporate operator.

The more airports option is a big one, especially in the congested northeast. With the new slots programs at EWR and JFK, corporate jets that can use TEB and HPN are going to be in even higher demand.

Either that, or get a helicopter out to SWF and pick up your 767 there....



CFI--Certfied Freakin Idiot
User currently offlineAcNDTTech From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 338 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 16798 times:

The cabin is longer, taller and wider than anything else in it's class. It will carry 8 pax and 4 crew 7000nm at Mach 0.85 or 5000nm at Mach 0.9.....and do this at 51,000'. What more could ya ask for? We are Gulfstream, we don't build a business jet, we build THE business jet!

User currently offlineMD-90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 8507 posts, RR: 12
Reply 17, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 16782 times:



Quoting Dw747400 (Reply 15):
There are more than handful out there, but it seems that an increasing number of airliner conversions are hitting the market as well. You already discussed why its tough for Gulfstream to compete on cost with new-build airframes; a mid-life widebody is cheaper still. Even with a $20 million interior, you can still get a 767 for the price of a G550, and when your only putting on 800 hours a year its feasible

But the operating costs!


User currently offlineAcNDTTech From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 338 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 16770 times:



Quoting Dw747400 (Reply 15):
There are more than handful out there, but it seems that an increasing number of airliner conversions are hitting the market as well. You already discussed why its tough for Gulfstream to compete on cost with new-build airframes; a mid-life widebody is cheaper still. Even with a $20 million interior, you can still get a 767 for the price of a G550, and when your only putting on 800 hours a year its feasible

One of the biggest things to remember about the "business class" airplane - they are used as tools so that companys can continue making money. Sure, these aircraft aren't cheap to operate, but by not being able to get from point A, to point B, to point C, and back to point A may cost company's millions of dollars. Plus, the idea of being able to have a meeting, a nice meal, or even just relax in private is a big deal too. Finally, there are a few people out there that do have "private" jets for their own pleasure. This group is a very small minority of owners - These jets (from Citations and Lears up to B-747s and A-340s) are status symbols to them. Again, even most of these individuals use these aircraft in the operation of their own personal business endevors.


User currently offlineSoon7x7 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 3 days ago) and read 16743 times:

My clients that have G650's on order just always end up upgrading the Gulfstream fleets they already have. Gulfstream knows that they have their cornered niche and everytime they redevelop a model, a certain percentage of their customers will want to upgrade...Gulfstream almost competes against itself. Most Gulfstream flight dept's don't want Boeing heavy iron, Airbus heavy iron as their hangar facilities won't facilitate them...logistically doesn't make sense for them. Airports like HPN, TEB, and others, the two Gulftream Capitals of America, hardly have room to park Gulfstreams as it stands now, they absolutely don't have room for a ramp full of BBJ's. With new global business centers such as Dubai, Mombai, etc...G owners want range, seems that what Gulfstream keeps offering...I understand that the classic oval PAX windows are going to be even larger...currently they are about 18"x24".

User currently offlineDonniecs From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 75 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 16739 times:



Quoting Atlturbine (Reply 5):
I think the 600+ orders placed for this aircraft within the first week of its announced production speaks for itself.

I think that 600+ orders is a bit steep, maybe like 60 or so letters of intent. In all my trips to Savannah, Long Beach and Luton in the last year the rumor was 60-70 with the initial offering, 600+ would almost be double of their entire GV production run.

Quoting RoseFlyer (Reply 9):
Boeing and Airbus have a huge advantage because they can offer larger airplanes at the same acquisition cost as a Gulfstream and lower support costs.

Gulfstream support is getting better (cheaper), Jet Aviation bought out Midcoast a few years ago and Gulfstream just bought out Jet Aviation and Savannah Air Center so your choices of services centers (factory or otherwise) is growing. Plus Gulfstream operates a couple G150's for parts delivery when they can provide faster delivery than conventional means for AOG deliveries.

As mentioned Gulfstream wanted to keep their baby under the 100,000lbs marks for the obvious reasons stated. Also look at the limited use of composites compared to what could have been used. I believe they are setting themselves of to be able to implement more composites into the the aircraft in order to be able to stretch it (G750) without going over that 100k mark on weight. Plus they are successfully tested FBW and FBwireless so they are showing that they are willing to go against their tried and true designs and develop new technology for production.

BBJ's and ACJ's can't complete with Gulfstream when it comes to speed, altitude or distance and the Global can't complete when it comes to reliability and parts availability. You just need to ask yourself how many people you want to carry.



Charlie - Gulfstream flight mechanic
User currently offlineAcNDTTech From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 338 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 16712 times:



Quoting Soon7x7 (Reply 19):
My clients that have G650's on order just always end up upgrading the Gulfstream fleets they already have. Gulfstream knows that they have their cornered niche and everytime they redevelop a model, a certain percentage of their customers will want to upgrade...Gulfstream almost competes against itself.

We were talking about that the other day, the used Gulfstream market will be expanding when the orders for the 650 start to be delivered. Our current customers are definately looking forward to the 650, almost as much as we are.


User currently offlineDonniecs From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 75 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 16601 times:



Quoting Soon7x7 (Reply 19):
Gulfstream knows that they have their cornered niche and everytime they redevelop a model, a certain percentage of their customers will want to upgrade...Gulfstream almost competes against itself.

This has worked well for Gulfstream ever since the GI and GII's. The used market on Gulfstreams is and always has been strong and still makes Gulfstream a lot of money. The only true competitor for the Gulfstream right now is the Global Express.

Gulfstream has a bad habit (IMO) of taking a base model and tweaking it for customers. It makes for a confusing product line, not to mention parts and maintenance when everything is so similar. Look at the GV, G500, G350, G450, G550, they are all basically the same airplane. I under stand the G550 (new Planeview cockpit) from the GV but the G500 and the G350 for those that wanted a G550 but didn't want to write the check got the G350 and G450 (basically G550's without the range, HMG's and a few other minor items). Even the GIV had the GIV and GIV SP, GIII has the non-VSCF (DC) and the VSCF (AC) models and the GII line was crazy.

Also everybody is talking about how much bigger the G650 is going to be. If you look at the exterior dimensions, it's only really only inches bigger expect for length (38" longer). The new tube (a first since the GI and 14" wider on the inside), complete with new windows (even larger than the already largest in the industry) is what is going to sell this machine to customers.



Charlie - Gulfstream flight mechanic
User currently offlineSoon7x7 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 16577 times:



Quoting Donniecs (Reply 22):

Gulfstream is just like Nikon...the minute you've gotten comfortable w/ the new gear, acquired the upgrades...Voila!...we have a NEW AND BETTER MOUSETRAP!...  dollarsign   dollarsign   dollarsign 


User currently offlineLiedetectors From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 360 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 13 hours ago) and read 16407 times:



Quoting Donniecs (Reply 22):
It makes for a confusing product line, not to mention parts and maintenance when everything is so similar. Look at the GV, G500, G350, G450, G550, they are all basically the same airplane. I under stand the G550 (new Planeview cockpit) from the GV but the G500 and the G350 for those that wanted a G550 but didn't want to write the check got the G350 and G450 (basically G550's without the range

Not totally accurate. The only thing common between the GIV/GIV-SP and the GV is the basic fuselage stucture and a hand full of systems. The engines, wings, tails, and cockpit are all different.

The orignal GIV certified in the 80s. a few years later, Gulfstream certified a higher gross weight version and called it GIV-SP. In the early 90s, Gulfstream introduced the GV. And established a new price point in the Bizjet market. In the late 90s/early 2000s GAC introduced the GV-SP which had the planeview cockpit and increased the max take off thrust of the BR710. When General Dynamics acquired the IAI airplanes (the Astra and Galaxy) they rebranded the whole product line to a common numbering scheme. I will summarize the labeling as follows:

GIV - Original GIV as certified.

GIV-SP - an increased gross weight version of GIV (later designated as G400)

G300 was identical to the GIV-SP/G400 except it has a fuel system mod to reduce the fuel capacity and thus limit the range.

GV - Original GV as certified

GV-SP - Planview/higher thrust engines (later designated G550)

G500 is identical to the G550 except it has a fuel system mod to reduce the fuel capacity and thus limit the range

IAI Astra became the G100 (later replaced by new G150 in 2005)

IAI Galaxy became the G200 (to be replaced by the newly announced G250)

G450 - is the new version of the G400. it has the same cockpit and forward fuselage as the G550 and has uprated Tay engines. (The G400 was retired when G450 went into service)

G350 is identical to the G450 except it has a fuel system mod to reduce the fuel capacity and thus limit the range. (The G300 was retired when G350 went into service)



If it was said by us, then it must be true.
25 Post contains links Atlturbine : "Gulfstream got an overwhelming response to its G650 program launch announcement in mid-March, receiving Letters of Intent (LOI) for some 500 aircraf
26 Donniecs : That was the point I was trying to make, you posted a very long and confusing list for the average aviation person to interpolate. It's a big list fo
27 Atlturbine : I saw that as well in Breakfast Minutes Donniecs. You are obviously very familiar with this company. So you know how conservative they are! Have you
28 AcNDTTech : Gulfstream definately helped me out of a situation. I was working at a GREAT FBO in Battle Creek, MI, but the snow finally got to me. Gulfstream offe
29 DeltaGuy : The cockpit isn't actually that different, the GIV had the Honeywell SPZ-8400 avionics suite, and the classic G-V had the SPZ-8500, which still consi
30 Post contains links DEVILFISH : Indeed, thus this caveat is worth heeding..... They'd have to make the C-Series a reality first. Precisely the raison d'etre of companies such as thi
31 Wassupsf : I was at the launch of the G650 and worked at the Service Center in Savannah for a time. I know it has already been addressed but I would like to tell
32 Flighty : One interesting thing I read, and I don't know if this is true, was that the G650 burns substantially less fuel on a 5500km jouney than its smaller si
33 Dw747400 : Wow... how'd this come back? Even with additional tanks and a nice interior, you can't match the speed and range of a high-end Gulfstream. But ultimat
34 Wassupsf : Good points, and Gulfstream management did hear from the customer and their number one complaint was cost of parts. They will get very restless if the
35 Max Q : All very good points but there is one that has not been considered that may seem trivial when comparing Gulfstreams to Boeing and Airbus. Rear mounted
36 Njxc500 : Rear mounted engines don't seem to be an issue. I've been on a global, and you basically don't hear the engines. The cabins in these airplanes are so
37 ARFFdude : The G550 is also a window length longer than the regular GV, isn't it? Six windows per side on the GV versus seven on the 550?
38 Wassupsf : No the 550 is roughly the same airframe as the GV what makes it a 50 series is the avionics upgrades and entertainment system. They went from CRT disp
39 Max Q : Exactly my point !!
40 Brons2 : $70 million bucks and I'm shopping for a used A330. IMO, of course. Figure $15,000 DOC per flight hour and 500 hours per year...$7.5 mill/yr operatin
41 Wassupsf : Nope I am going for a G550, power, interior, and ability to land where ever I want to go. Don't forget, they landed a G II in Antarctica on the ice a
42 Liedetectors : That and as an easy way to incorporate the IAI Galaxy and Astra into a common brand label. No. The seventh window showed up due to when the cockpit g
43 Keesje : Gulfstream aims at a specific segment, obviously not the sae as the BBJ/Airbusses. When they launched the G650 I was really surprized why they made ca
44 DonnieCS : That cabin internal height is 77 inches per the gulfstream site. The current G550 is cabin height is 74 inches. The G650 is going to be 14 inches wid
45 MD-90 : And wasn't that the first true integrated electronic flight deck on a business jet? I think I remember reading that somewhere. While the "XRS" sounds
46 DonnieCS : Agreed this was merely and advertising gimmick, although Gulfstream does some of the highest realistic cruise speeds during long range operations for
47 Dw747400 : Agreed. Many of the aircraft I work with loose an incredible amount of range when they get pushed more than a few .02 or .03 over their LRC cruise. G
Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic Why The Gulfstream G 650 Is Not Larger?
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Tech/Ops related posts only!
  • Not Tech/Ops related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
Why The 73G And 738 But Not For The 736 Or 739? posted Fri May 10 2002 13:32:04 by Godbless
Why Flight Manual Is Not Mandatory For Light A/c? posted Wed Jan 30 2002 12:03:35 by Y_islam
Why Main Landing Gear Is Tilted During The Landing posted Sun Sep 9 2001 10:31:23 by Cool777
Why The VC10 Never Made A Good Cargo Jet? posted Fri Oct 24 2008 14:36:41 by 747400sp
CF11 And CF15 Why The Callsigns Vary? posted Mon Apr 7 2008 01:07:08 by Revo
CF6-6 Engine On DC-10... Why The Weird Cone? posted Tue Mar 4 2008 08:11:31 by BR715-A1-30
Why Does JetBlue A320 Seem Not To Reverse Thrust posted Thu Jul 12 2007 06:29:44 by JETBLUEATASW
F-16, Why The Spine? posted Thu May 3 2007 16:44:43 by Cancidas
Why The Little Hole At The Bottom Of The Window? posted Tue Oct 17 2006 03:19:07 by Gh123
Beechcraft 1900: Why The T-Tail? posted Fri Aug 4 2006 22:39:24 by KELPkid

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format