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Quirkiest Quirk About Airliners?  
User currently offlineKhobar From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 2379 posts, RR: 3
Posted (5 years 7 months 3 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 17925 times:

Of all the airliners through the ages, what's the quirkiest quirk of any of them? For example, the Trident had an offset nose gear that closed sideways, and main gear that rotated 90 degrees to fit the main wells. But that's a minor design "quirk" if it even qualifies.

Although not an airliner, the nose strut of the B-58 was retracted in a quirky way to clear that big ole pod it carried in the belly. But again, that's a design "quirk".

Are there any operational quirks and, if so, what are they? For example, the DC-8 had the capability of thrust reversers activating in the air, but I've seen TU-154's and some other aircraft with TR's deployed before touchdown, so I don't know if that's a quirk. Even if it is, I'd guess it's optional - they don't have to be deployed prior to touchdown (or do they in some cases?).

Any other mandatory operational quirks?

157 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineEx52tech From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 559 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (5 years 7 months 3 weeks 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 17666 times:



Quoting Khobar (Thread starter):
Are there any operational quirks and, if so, what are they? For example, the DC-8 had the capability of thrust reversers activating in the air, but I've seen TU-154's and some other aircraft with TR's deployed before touchdown, so I don't know if that's a quirk. Even if it is, I'd guess it's optional - they don't have to be deployed prior to touchdown (or do the

My understanding on an airliner being able to deploy reversers in the air is due to the time requirements for a given airplane to get from a given altitude to an altitude in which pressurization is not necessary. It would be necessary for those airplanes to use their reversers as speed brakes in order to get down in time without "red-lining" the airplane.

There is a more technical explination, that I'm sure someone will get you, but that is my understanding as to why. Hope that helps.



"Saddest thing I ever witnessed....an airplane being scrapped"
User currently offlineBlackbird From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (5 years 7 months 3 weeks 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 17560 times:

The DC-8 was originally designed with a pair of split-brakes on the lower section of the fuselage behind the wing as well as thrust-reversers -- However, the brakes turned out to be almost useless, and the reversers turned out more effective than imagined so they never re-designed the brakes and removed them.


Blackbird


User currently offlineN6238P From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 508 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (5 years 7 months 3 weeks 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 17546 times:

I tend to stumble across plenty of videos and pictures of the IL-76 landing nose gear first. Is this just a coincidence of bad pilots being caught on camera or is this actually a common practice?


To actively root against anybody is just low, and I hope karma comes back at you with a vengeance
User currently offlineMax Q From United States of America, joined May 2001, 4522 posts, RR: 18
Reply 4, posted (5 years 7 months 3 weeks 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 17412 times:

Perhaps not that quirky but the 727 had brakes on the nosewheel on some versions.


The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.
User currently offlineEx52tech From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 559 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (5 years 7 months 3 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 17391 times:



Quoting Max Q (Reply 4):
Perhaps not that quirky but the 727 had brakes on the nosewheel on some versions.

I only saw them on the 721's that I worked on, and only those that were dedicated to some routes with short runways. They were different.



"Saddest thing I ever witnessed....an airplane being scrapped"
User currently offlineScooter01 From Norway, joined Nov 2006, 1204 posts, RR: 8
Reply 6, posted (5 years 7 months 3 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 17381 times:
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I always thought it was pretty cool, -when standing at the end of a runway, a prop airliner
taxied into position and held with it's tail towards me, -all the noise from it's engines disappeared!


Scooter01  crazy 



"We all have a girl and her name is nostalgia" - Hemingway
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25332 posts, RR: 22
Reply 7, posted (5 years 7 months 3 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 17376 times:



Quoting Blackbird (Reply 2):
The DC-8 was originally designed with a pair of split-brakes on the lower section of the fuselage behind the wing as well as thrust-reversers -- However, the brakes turned out to be almost useless, and the reversers turned out more effective than imagined so they never re-designed the brakes and removed them.

As I recall, the DC-8 also lacks flight spoilers so reverse thrust helps do the job spoilers would normally do (DC-8 spoilers can only be used after touchdown.) AC lost an almost brand new DC-8-63 at YYZ in 1970 when the ground spoilers were inadvertently deployed before touchdown. All 109 aboard were killed.

I'm not sure how frequently reverse thrust was used in the air, probably not very often. I have heard that it caused a fair amount of noise and vibration in the cabin. I flew on many DC-8s of almost every model and can't recall noticing anything like that.

I believe the Ilyushin 62 can also use reverse thrust in the air (it only has reversers on the two outboard engines if memory correct).


User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25332 posts, RR: 22
Reply 8, posted (5 years 7 months 3 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 17362 times:

Going back a few decades, I always thought it strange that AA required that the passenger door on their DC-3s be on the right side. They had the same requirement for the Convair 240 for which they were the launch customer. The 340 and 440 had the door on the more usual left side. (Photo below at BOS 1957).

http://i147.photobucket.com/albums/r293/VIEWLINER/0807/LOGAN3.jpg


User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 59
Reply 9, posted (5 years 7 months 3 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 17363 times:
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Quoting Khobar (Thread starter):
Of all the airliners through the ages, what's the quirkiest quirk of any of them?

I nominate the JATO-equipped 727s flown by Mexicana:

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c81/aloges/JATO.jpg


2H4



Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlineEx52tech From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 559 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (5 years 7 months 3 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 17309 times:

I thought it was strange that the B-52-G/H had only spoilers and no ailerons.


"Saddest thing I ever witnessed....an airplane being scrapped"
User currently offlineMax Q From United States of America, joined May 2001, 4522 posts, RR: 18
Reply 11, posted (5 years 7 months 3 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 17228 times:

Our 727-200's in Air Mike all had nosewheel brakes, I saw a few in domestic service as well although they were deactivated.


The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 12, posted (5 years 7 months 3 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 17215 times:

Though not specifically externally visible.
But on the B732 MWW,The only filter bowl needing a strapwrench to open was the return filter of the system B.seems odd when all the other filter bowls on the type everywhere were wrench driven.
Commonility was defeated here.

regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineRwessel From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 2352 posts, RR: 2
Reply 13, posted (5 years 7 months 3 weeks 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 17196 times:
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Quoting Ex52tech (Reply 10):
I thought it was strange that the B-52-G/H had only spoilers and no ailerons.

As does the Mitsubishi Mu-2 and, I think, a few other bizjets.


User currently offlineCpd From Australia, joined Jun 2008, 4879 posts, RR: 38
Reply 14, posted (5 years 7 months 3 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 17160 times:



Quoting Khobar (Thread starter):
Of all the airliners through the ages, what's the quirkiest quirk of any of them? For example, the Trident had an offset nose gear that closed sideways, and main gear that rotated 90 degrees to fit the main wells. But that's a minor design "quirk" if it even qualifies.

Concorde, engine number 4 speed on take-off.

A quite unusual quirk (but a fairly simple fix) used to get around a problem I assume nobody imagined when the plane was designed.


User currently offlineEx52tech From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 559 posts, RR: 1
Reply 15, posted (5 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 17066 times:



Quoting Rwessel (Reply 13):
As does the Mitsubishi Mu-2 and, I think, a few other bizjets.

That is what I was looking for, which other ones. Wasn't thinking when I posted, and anyway the B-52 is not an airliner.  guilty 



"Saddest thing I ever witnessed....an airplane being scrapped"
User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 59
Reply 16, posted (5 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 17033 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR

The use of drag chutes in airline ops is was a bit quirky, too:


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Photo © Mel Lawrence
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Photo © Kjell Nilsson



2H4



Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlineKhobar From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 2379 posts, RR: 3
Reply 17, posted (5 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 16968 times:



Quoting 2H4 (Reply 9):
I nominate the JATO-equipped 727s flown by Mexicana:

Oh that is brilliant! Thank you.

Some really interesting quirks - thanks very much.


User currently offlineMax Q From United States of America, joined May 2001, 4522 posts, RR: 18
Reply 18, posted (5 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 16789 times:

On the MD80 they were not able to mount the compass above the glareshield due to excessive deviation error.

Solution, mount it behind the First Officers head ! then mount two mirrors above the glareshield and tell Pilots to swivel them so by looking into one then reflecting that image into the other you could 'at a glance' tell your compass heading.

Not that we look at the mag compass very much but still !



The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 19, posted (5 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 16758 times:



Quoting Max Q (Reply 18):

On the MD80 they were not able to mount the compass above the glareshield due to excessive deviation error.

Amazing.what caused it.
regds
MEL...



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineShhpanked From United States of America, joined Dec 2008, 69 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (5 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 16755 times:

I suppose the tandem gear on Air India's A320s could qualify.


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Photo © Jakkrit Prasertwit




People fly airplanes and pilots fly helicopters.
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17039 posts, RR: 66
Reply 21, posted (5 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 16713 times:



Quoting Ex52tech (Reply 10):
I thought it was strange that the B-52-G/H had only spoilers and no ailerons.

IIRC the A310 only has inboard ailerons, using spoilers for extra control at low speeds. A little bit quirky at least.

Quoting Max Q (Reply 18):
On the MD80 they were not able to mount the compass above the glareshield due to excessive deviation error.

Solution, mount it behind the First Officers head ! then mount two mirrors above the glareshield and tell Pilots to swivel them so by looking into one then reflecting that image into the other you could 'at a glance' tell your compass heading.

 rotfl   rotfl   rotfl 



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineXaraB From Norway, joined Aug 2007, 210 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (5 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 16689 times:



Quoting Cpd (Reply 14):
Concorde, engine number 4 speed on take-off.

Please excuse my ignorance, but what was all this about?
In order not to hijack the thread, a link to another previous one (which I seem unable to find...  Sad) is more than appreciated!



An open mind is not an empty one
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25332 posts, RR: 22
Reply 23, posted (5 years 7 months 3 weeks 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 16404 times:

Two other quirky things came to mind:

The Tu-114's contra-rotating props (as on the Tu-95 Bear bomber on which it was based).


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Photo © Robert Roggeman




The "Speedpak" for the L749 Constellation that attached to the bottom of the fuselage for inreased cargo capacity.


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Photo © John F. Ciesla



User currently offlineVasu From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2005, 3916 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (5 years 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 16262 times:

Is the DC-9 the only airliner that can reverse from the gate without needing pushback?

25 Post contains links and images DiamondFlyer : Nope, I did it in an AA F100 a few times. I'd venture to guess, that anything with the tail mounted engines could do it. Speaking of the F100, how ab
26 HAWK21m : Most empennage mounted engined aircraft can perform powerbacks. regds MEL.
27 Blackbird : Starlionblue, The Convair 880 and Convair 990 also used the same means for roll-control. Blackbird
28 Post contains images 2H4 : I thought of another one. The MD-90 has movable control surfaces on the engine pylons. They are there to assist in recovery from potential stall by pr
29 TWAL1011727 : Nah...thats the pretty woman (or guy...gender not-withstanding) walking down the aisle mirror. Continental did a powerback with a B737-200 at MLB one
30 Post contains links Scooter01 : You mean like this one? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUdVRpjHqvA Scooter01
31 Post contains images Jetlagged : To add to its list of quirks, the Trident 3 had a fourth booster engine in the tail for takeoffs. It had the ability to use thrust reverse in flight
32 Post contains images Viscount724 : And the Fokker F28, F70, F100.
33 Post contains links Viscount724 : " target=_blank>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUdVR...jHqvA Or these (2nd one a Canadian Air Force DHC-5 Buffalo). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MR
34 SP90 : I recall reading about a NW DC-9 that actually went supersonic briefly and then went on to fly revenue service for many years.
35 Ex52tech : I worked for them, and never heard of that one, but you never know, could have happened. I know that it did happen with a Whale though, and they dama
36 Max Q : We did powerbacks on the 727, DC9, and Md80 regularly at Continental. Never thought it was a good idea though, great way to suck in the Fod that is al
37 Tdscanuck : Anything with thrust reversers *can* do it. It's a bad idea on anything with low-mounted engines, and many a/c with tail-mounted engines don't bother
38 Cpd : The speed on engine no.4 was reduced to 88% N1 by a limiter. I believe airflow off the wing caused excessive vibration on this engine, so until a par
39 HAWK21M : The Pilot needs to remember to stop a powerback on a B732 with Fwd thrust & not the Brakes. regds MEL
40 Ex52tech : Which ones were these. Unless you are talking about VC-10s, Tridents, Caravelle, or F-28s. We did all the time, just had to remember not to touch the
41 Mastropiero : I am sure there is a very logical explanation for this, and once you tell me what it is I know I´ll feel really stupid but right now I can´t figure
42 2H4 : If you touch the brakes while the aircraft is rolling backward, there's a good chance the nosewheel will come off the ground and the aircraft will co
43 Mastropiero : I see, thanks a lot. This leads me to another quick question - sorry for hijacking the thread - : do airliners have brakes on the nose landing gear to
44 2H4 : Certain versions of the Boeing 727 had nosewheel brakes. Maybe a few other models, too. Today, though, virtually no airliner has them. 2H4
45 Mastropiero : Thanks, 2H4.
46 Tdscanuck : I was under the impression that none of the CRJ's or tail-mounted E-jets were certified for powerbacks. Can somebody confirm? Tom.
47 FLY2HMO : And to think I still got to fly on them, but only after they removed their rocket packs. I thought the Beta setting was just for putting the props on
48 2H4 : Oh, to have only heard them from inside the cabin..... 2H4
49 Nz2 : Here in Auckland NZL, Qantas and AA 707's used to do self reverse regularly, used a lot of gas however, hence the move to tugs. Would be the same for
50 HAWK21M : Just ask,no need to feel stupid,We all are learning every day As explained above,Applying brakes while the Aircraft is rolling back can cause a tilt
51 JoseKMLB : Yes and why would the 27 tip and sit on its tail during refueling if the aft stairs were not down? Then if they were down and did not tip after you p
52 HaveBlue : The Air Florida 737 that crashed into the Potomac River in Washington, D.C. used reverse thrust to push back as well. Also as a child I was on an Eas
53 Blackbird : I'd say that some of the tridents having a fourth engine would probably be one of the quirkier design features. Blackbird
54 HaveBlue : That was supposed to be MCO to PIT.
55 Ex52tech : That is what I figured you were talking about, I got as close as I was going to get with the F-28, and only because they made the F-100 out of it. I
56 Litz : This was actually one of the contributing factors ... the powerback sucked a lot of ice/snow into the engine; this was one of the reasons for the inc
57 HAWK21M : I was talking about B732. The P1 EPR ports in the nose dome if Iced will give a much higher false EPR [p7/p1]. regds MEL
58 Jetlagged : Beta control is used for reverse. Early turboprops had ground fine pitch settings without beta control.
59 Jetlagged : Interesting. INS development scuppered the idea presumably. So I believe the Trident was the only production airliner to have mechanical moving map i
60 Post contains links and images Scooter01 : The DC-3 never seized to amaze me. It first flew on Dec.22 1935, more than 73 yers ago, and is still going on: There were a few conversions that I bet
61 JoseKMLB : Yeah Mel I know you were I was just asking a question about the 27 and why would it tip if the stairs were not down during loading and fueling but af
62 PGNCS : It was evidently the same on the DC-8, and was certainly the same on the DC-9. I understand it was perpetuated into the DC-10 program, but I can't ve
63 Ex52tech : I'm not sure if you mean the problems followed along into the DC-10 program, but it's mag compass was mounted right out in front, plain sight. Well y
64 HAWK21M : I've not worked the B727,but I'm surprised if thats the case.In fact noticed a B727 being refuelled last week & the Aft stair was retracted. Whats in
65 PGNCS : Thanks, Ex52tech, I stand corrected. I had been told that the DC-10 compass was mounted similarly, but that is obviously bad information. That's why
66 FLY2HMO : Ah, gotcha.[Edited 2009-02-02 10:56:59]
67 JohnClipper : Was on an EA 757 from ATL to EWR and we reversed out of the gate as well...Very Loud!
68 HAWK21M : I heard that Eastern used Powerbacks frequently on their B757s.Although its not permitted as per our SOPs for our B757s. regds MEL
69 AC320tech : I heard that too, and something says the L1011 too, although I think I am wrong about that. Another quirk, the Fokker F100 and F70 don't require flap
70 BMI727 : I think I heard somewhere that the A300/310 can do the same. While on the subject of quirky flaps, how about McDonnell Douglas' dial-a-flap system?
71 TWAL1011727 : " target=_blank>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUdVR...jHqvA I'm suprised that in the 1940s-1950s they would be that risque having a woman remove her
72 Starlionblue : IIRC at certain weights they don't need slats. Not that I'm an expert but the mores of the 40s and 50s were far less strict than, say, the 1900s.
73 Jetlagged : Not sure she was taking her blouse off, more like a nightgown. Still, I'll watch it a few more times to make sure. Actually Hollywood films of the er
74 Phatty3374 : Pardon my ignorance, but what exactly is this and how is it different from other flap systems? Tom
75 Post contains links and images Rwessel : Now that you mention it, there was a *three* engine turboprop conversion of a DC-3 in 1977: View Large View MediumPhoto © Eggert Norðdahl
76 Post contains links Tdscanuck : http://www.airliners.net/aviation-forums/tech_ops/read.main/180051/ It basically allows you to pick any flap position over a fairly large range, rath
77 DH106 : My favourite quirk is on the 767: during gear transit there apparently isn't quite enough room within the wing volume above the trunnion area for the
78 Starlionblue : Quite. It is closed when the gear is retraced or fully extended. It only opens in a certain range of travel. I have always found this to be a very el
79 HAWK21M : It would be interesting to hear the story that prompted this mod. regds MEL
80 Starlionblue : "Dude, the gear has to be yay long or the butt will slam the ground when she rotate." "Well duuuude, if it's that long it won't fit in the wing while
81 HAWK21M : Tell me the truth.....You left out the discussion in the Pub part deliberitly On a serious note.....Was wondering if a damage during production promp
82 Post contains links and images 474218 : The C-17 has a similar "quirk". When the gear is down small doors open in the MLG fairing to allow gear extension. These doors close when the gear is
83 HAWK21M : Educational. Any pic of the B767 with that panel. regds MEL
84 Post contains links and images 2H4 : I think I found it. I think it's the rectangular panel in the lower-left corner of this shot: View Large View MediumPhoto © York Schreiber And i
85 DH106 : Yep - good pictures, well caught ! It's very difficult to see the panel open as you have to catch the 767 "from behind" ( !) with the gear legs mid t
86 HAWK21M : Interestingly the wing walk area goes over that panel. regds MEL.
87 FLY2HMO : So is that on all 767 versions? I've only flown on the 764 and, I may be mistaken, but I don't remember seeing something like that. The 764 has a tot
88 UltimateDelta : Don't SAHA Air's 707s have a double window toward the back of the fuselage? That's another weird feature of their planes.
89 Post contains images Viscount724 : Yes. It was to facilitate observation of aerial refuelling activities when the aircraft were used by the Iranian Air Force as tankers. Second photo b
90 Blackbird : Nobody mentioned the IL-62, It has a tail-strut/wheel to prevent the plane from ending up on it's tail during loading. The tail strut has to be retrac
91 Post contains links and images DAirbus : Here is another good picture from a previous thread on the topic. View Large View MediumPhoto © Quinn Savit http://www.airliners.net/aviation-fo
92 Ex52tech : Somebody is going to prove me wrong here, but here goes.........I am about 99% sure that Dial-a-flap was an option on the DC-10. I believe we had som
93 Max Q : I think that is a Douglas 'thing' Certainly on the MD 80 we operated the Slats and Flaps separately, although with the same handle, sounds confusing b
94 Ex52tech : Yeah, that is the same way the handle functons on a DC-10. You have to raise the slat handle while pushing down on the flap handle in order to retrac
95 B777Neuss : Ok not today but "yesterday" , the concorde had brakes in the nosewheel.
96 Post contains links 474218 : Where? http://www.concordesst.com/gear.html
97 B777Neuss : I also know this source, but trust me, the concorde had. In the documentary of ITVV the flight ingenieur talks about the front gear. I don't remember
98 Post contains images Viscount724 : The Lockheed L188 Electra and Navy P-3 based on the L188 seem to have a wider than usual cockpit with separate sets of throttles for the captain and f
99 AC320tech : The Fokker F28 had this, and I have no clue why.
100 Post contains images JoeCanuck : The gravel deflectors on some 732's were a bit of a quirk; [Edited 2009-02-10 19:38:22]
101 Ex52tech : I have seen RR engines on a 727, and JT8-217s on a 727, but CFM.........I hope you don't mean CFM56 engines. I seriously doubt that, the weight alone
102 StealthZ : How does that work??
103 B777Neuss : The system is/was mounted inside or behind the wheels. Both wheels were braked. I never thought about weight issues, but someone told me that there w
104 BMI727 : I don't know about CFMs, but all of the 5X 727-100s were re-engined with RR Tays. There was some old propliner (a DC-6 I think) that had the flight e
105 B777Neuss : I had a look at the documentary again and should add that both wheels in the nosegear were braked with a disc brake which was only used after takeoff
106 Mastropiero : Not that it matters the slightest, but you quoted the wrong guy there.
107 Post contains links and images Filton : How about the Caravelle's triangular windows? View Large View MediumPhoto © Eduard Marmet Anyone know of any technical reason for this - or was i
108 TripleDelta : I've read that this was to increase downward visibility. The apex was at about eye-level, with the triangular shape giving an excellent field of view
109 Avt007 : The F28 cockpit is quite wide, especially compared to a 737. The throttle arrangement gives the crew a nice ergonomic setup, with the throttles nice
110 Viscount724 : The L188 also appears to have separate landing gear levers for the captain and first officer (left hand photo in Reply 97). I'm not sure where the la
111 Max Q : That's interesting Ex52 tech, I did not know you could literally separate the flap / slat handles on the MD-80, it sounds like it could be quite usefu
112 Greasespot : C-GXFA is the only B272-200 combi with a movable bulkhead.... It is still flying in this capacity for Firstair GS
113 474218 : The wing area of the MD-80 is larger than the 737-200/300 and only slightly smaller the 737-800/900. MD-80 wing area 1209 sq ft. 737-300 wing area 98
114 ImperialEagle : Well, at DL, reverse-thrust on the -8's was a VERY common occurance. Also, you are right about the IL-62's. I snapped a photo of one crossing Lejune
115 Post contains links and images Viscount724 : A few Viscounts with the slipper tanks. View Large View MediumPhoto © Steve Williams
116 Post contains links and images DAirbus : The 727-200 had a small step folded up against the fuselage and secured by a lip on the bottom of the aft over-wing exit. When you opened the hatch in
117 Ex52tech : I was talking about the DC-10 being able to split the two levers, and was wondering if it was the same on the MD-80, because I could not recall...bee
118 Max Q : Not sure about whether you could separate the flap / slat levers on the -80. It was not something we ever did as Pilots.
119 HAWK21M : whats prevents its misuse in flight? regds MEL.
120 Ex52tech : There is a tab that flips up into to place and then screws into the back of the flap handle. I can't find a good picture of it..........still looking
121 LASOctoberB6 : Would someone explain what JATO-equipped means? I did that in Flight Sim a few years ago.. I thought something was wrong with the plane for wanting t
122 474218 : Jet Assisted Take Off (JATO). Actually the JATO bottles are small rockets which add extra thrust for takeoff.
123 HAWK21M : Interesting. It would be great to view a picture. regds MEL.
124 Stratoduck : according to my father, the main gears legs on the convair 880 could be extended at any speed as an emergency speed brake. once the aircraft slowed fu
125 LongHauler : And everything loose in the cabin was thrown against the cockpit door! Actually, the same could be done with the DC-7. We used to do the same thing w
126 BMI727 : That Gulfstream that NASA uses to train shuttle pilots can do the same thing, as well as deploy the reversers in flight to simulate the glide down to
127 Post contains links and images AmericanB763ER : I'm surprised that noone came up with this one yet ( although the Diesel 8 has been mentioned countless times in this thread ) - I'm talking about the
128 JoeCanuck : That is quirky...didn't it have slats?
129 Avt007 : The F28 main gear doors had a second door built into them, so that you could climb into the gearbay without dropping the doors. It was very convenient
130 AmericanB763ER : No, DC-8 didn't have them - I think all of them (including the -70's) had the slots. Marco
131 Max Q : Here's one I just remembered from a long time ago. The Saab 340 (then the SF340) had explosive bolts on the gear doors to open them in the event of hy
132 HAWK21M : Any details on the principle of operation of this "explosive" bolt. regds MEL.
133 Max Q : I will see if I can dig up my ancient manuals on the Saab, cant guarantee anything !
134 HAWK21m : No pressure.The term was interesting though.On the B737NG there is a frangible fitting that breaks when contacted by a decapped tire & stops hydrauli
135 BMI727 : Did anyone mention the nozzles that moved backwards to keep the noise down yet?
136 474218 : The L-1011 Ram Air Turbine (RAT) is held in place by an "explosive" squib. When hydraulic power is lost the squib is fired and springs pull the RAT i
137 Post contains links and images Francoflier : Just to add to the list, the Yak-40 also uses reverse thrust on the center engine before the flare. View Large View MediumPhoto © Jiri Zedka It
138 HAWK21M : Interesting concept. regds MEL
139 UAL747 : The Boeing 777 on take-off. If you watch the inboard ailerons, they are drooping with the flaps,. but as the engines throttle up and the plane gains s
140 DH106 : I read about this quite a while ago. I think the issue is that at low airspeed / high power settings (i.e. start of T/O run) the inner aileron when d
141 Post contains links UAL747 : Actually, I know why they go downward later on because the hydraulics kick in sometime down the takeoff run, but why have them not already locked and
142 Ex52tech : Seems a little 007ish. The DC-10 just used a plain old lever and cable set up that unlocked the up lock latch.
143 Ex52tech : How about the air start bottle in the wheel well of some early 707's, used in the event one did not have an air start cart available.
144 474218 : and the DC-10 used chines in the stabilizer trim system, seems a little bicycleish?
145 Avt007 : Many CRJs have the same system. There are two types of ADG on CRJs, and the other has an uplock latch like a gear uplock. Sounds fishy to me. Hydraul
146 474218 : Actually the hydraulic system is on anytime the engine is running, if the engine is turning the hydraulic pump is turning. There are switches that ca
147 UAL747 : So then explain to me what is going on with the 777 then. I don't quite understand DH106's explanation. UAL
148 474218 : On the 777 the aileron droops when the flaps are lowered. However, it still functions as an aileron (for roll control). The reason the aileron is mov
149 UAL747 : No no.... Watch the video of the 777 taking off that I posted on here. The inboard ailerons do the exact same thing on both sides every time the airc
150 474218 : I was talking about the aileron movement starting at the 1:00 point on the video, these are the pilot applying roll inputs. The aileron drooping then
151 DH106 : I explained it in Reply #140. The aileron normally droops with the flaps, but might be affected by hot engine exhaust for the first part of the T/O r
152 Ex52tech : Sorry about the nerve damage. I understand that the chines, or strakes, on the engines were to keep the engines from oscillating due to the placement
153 DH106 : I'm guessing he meant CHAINS not chines.
154 474218 : Spell Check doesn't do anything for the wrong word spelled correctly!
155 JoeCanuck : In that case, I need, "Intent Check", on my computer to sort that stuff out. Stoopid, non psychic computers...
156 Ex52tech : Hey....I even mentioned the chains, and didn't make the connection, that's what I get for being up for 40 some odd hours and then getting on the A ne
157 Burner71 : Thank you. When I was younger I took an AA F-100 and I remember thinking...oh my god he doesnt have the flaps down and I was freaking out and that fo
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