Sponsor Message:
Aviation Technical / Operations Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
ACN-PCN Relation And Calculation  
User currently offlineA388 From Netherlands Antilles, joined May 2001, 9559 posts, RR: 11
Posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 18766 times:

Hello,

I read that an aircraft can land on a runway with a higher ACN value compared to the runway PCN. How can this be determined? I thought that the PCN could never be exceeded by the ACN. If an aircraft lands on a runway with a higher ACN on a frequent basis, how can it be calculated how often such aircraft are allowed to land on the runway?

What do the different letters mean, such as F, B, X, U, A, W, T? I assume these letters can be used in all combinations depending on the calculation and/or condition of a runway?

Best regards,

A388

2 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineflymatt2bermud From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 563 posts, RR: 7
Reply 1, posted (4 years 2 months 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 16877 times:

If the ACN for an airplane is lower than or equal to the reported PCN for an airport pavement, the airplane can operate without weight restriction on that pavement. For example, if you have a PCN of 81/F/B/W/T and you have an ACN of 53 for a 388,000 lb 767-300ER on a flexible pavement with a B subgrade, that airplane can operate at that airport at 388,000 lbs for an unlimited number of annual operations. On the other hand, if the PCN happened to be 51, the 767-300ER could not operate at that airport at 388,000 lb for unlimited operations. It may, however, be able to operate at a lower weight or be able to operate on a limited number of operations at the higher weight. This would have to be coordinated with the airport authority.

Quoting A388 (Thread starter):
What do the different letters mean, such as F, B, X, U, A, W, T?

The number in the PCN string relates to the allowable weight of the aircraft. The first letter refers to (F)lexible or (R)igid pavement. The second letter relates to the bearing strength of the subgrade soil beneath the pavement. The third letter gives a range of allowable tire pressures, and the fourth letter is the evaluation method. If the fourth letter is a "T" , that means that a technical evaluation of the pavement was conducted. "U" indicates that the "Using Aircraft" method of evaluation was used. That is to say that the equivalent ACN of the highest gross weight of the largest airplane currently using the airport is reported as the pavement strength for the pavement.

Pavement Classification Numbers (PCN), are reported as a 5-part code. For example: PCN 65/F/A/W/T:
Part 1 - 65, the PCN the highest permitted ACN at the appropriate subgrade category.

Part 2 - F, the type of pavement: F = flexible, R = rigid.

Part 3 - A, pavement subgrade category:
....................................PAVEMENT........PAVEMENT
Code......Category.............CBR*................K, PCI*......
...A.......... HIGH ..............OVER 13 ..........OVER 400
...B........ MEDIUM............. 8 - 13 ..............201 - 400
...C........... LOW.................4 - 8 .............100 - 200
...D...... ULTRA LOW...........0 - 4 .............UNDER - 100
*K, PCI = Kilograms per cubic inch.
*CBR= Bearing capacity of a soil
Part 4 - W, maximum tire pressure: the maximum authorized for the pavement. W = high, no limit. X = medium, limited to (217 psi). Y = low, limited to (145 psi). Z = very low, limited to (73 psi).

Part 5 - T, pavement design/evaluation method: T = technical design or evaluation, U = by historical data of aircraft using the pavement.



Now, someone tell me where I put the aspirin? 














[Edited 2010-02-10 09:49:01]


"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward" Leonardo Da Vinci
User currently offlineFlymatt2bermud From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 563 posts, RR: 7
Reply 2, posted (1 year 2 months 3 weeks 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 6915 times:

Had to refer back to this for my own recollection!


"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward" Leonardo Da Vinci
Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic ACN-PCN Relation And Calculation
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Tech/Ops related posts only!
  • Not Tech/Ops related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
Calculation And Application Of Reverse Thrust posted Wed Oct 25 2006 03:05:10 by HighFlyer9790
DC-10: The Relation Between Ailerons And Gear posted Thu Nov 14 2002 15:23:48 by LMML 14/32
Heat And Takeoff Relation posted Fri Aug 10 2001 09:00:31 by Alee
No ETOPS For GEnx And Trent 1000? posted Sun Apr 26 2009 09:31:33 by A342
Brake And Tyre Life posted Sat Apr 25 2009 18:46:52 by Rmm
Redesigned Engine Chevrons - Origin And Future? posted Sat Apr 11 2009 04:40:24 by SR183
Airbus A340 - Why A Quad And Not A Trijet? posted Tue Apr 7 2009 17:50:09 by 1337Delta764
Aircraft Used On SK679 (SAS) And X3 1213 (TUIFly)? posted Mon Apr 6 2009 19:40:27 by Asgeirs
MD-82 And MD-88 posted Mon Apr 6 2009 10:15:40 by Uhntissbaby111
Major Airports With Land And Water Runways posted Mon Mar 23 2009 13:14:08 by HaYnFlyer
DC-10: The Relation Between Ailerons And Gear posted Thu Nov 14 2002 15:23:48 by LMML 14/32
Heat And Takeoff Relation posted Fri Aug 10 2001 09:00:31 by Alee
Aircraft Altitude And Speed Indicators posted Wed Nov 23 2011 18:49:11 by dkramer7
TLV-HKG Engine Fuel Consumption Calculation posted Sun Nov 20 2011 02:08:29 by An225
EK F/As And Salary posted Sat Nov 19 2011 10:28:27 by caleb1
Superhydrophobic Spray Repels Water And Dirt posted Mon Nov 14 2011 16:17:02 by LU9092
A380 And Its' Predecessors posted Fri Nov 11 2011 00:48:55 by esgg

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format