Sponsor Message:
Aviation Technical / Operations Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
MD 80- What's On The Nosewheel?  
User currently offlineZionstrat From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 226 posts, RR: 0
Posted (12 years 11 months 3 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 2840 times:

Some members of the DC9 family seem to have a "box" that surrounds the rear half of the nose wheel as can be seen if you look closely at this photo-


Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © Remi Dallot



This is an MD83, but I thought I have seen 83's without this feature as well- Can anyone explain what this is and why it appears to be optional?



12 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineTuffty From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2001, 92 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (12 years 11 months 3 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 2755 times:

the box that i think your refering to at the back of the nose wheel is a stone deflector this is in place to prevent any debris that is thrown up from entering the engine intakes. i think that this was due to the earlyer types from having a large amount of fod damage.

regards tuffty Smile


User currently offlineMr Spaceman From Canada, joined Mar 2001, 2787 posts, RR: 9
Reply 2, posted (12 years 11 months 3 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 2743 times:

Hi Zionstrat.

That's a good question...in fact, it's identical to one that I asked around 6 months ago.

If you click on my username, and then on Thread Starters under the Tech/Ops section of my personal profile...you'll find a post listed there at the very bottom that is tittled "DC-9 Nosegear Question". There's 21 replies to this post that are full of excellent info!

Basically, I learned that the object is a water/slush "Spray Deflector" kit, which helps keep any spray off the nosewheels from being induced into the aft engines, which are so close to the body.

Take Care.

Chris  Smile






"Just a minute while I re-invent myself"
User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29799 posts, RR: 58
Reply 3, posted (12 years 11 months 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 2671 times:

As has been mentioned before it is a spray deflector.

It works by making the spray from the tires go out at a shallower angle then just the normal tires. This was the spray misses the engines.

On some aircraft they have "chined" tires that accomplish the same thing. On those there is a rubber lip that is molded onto the tire that accomplishes the same thing.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineJwenting From Netherlands, joined Apr 2001, 10213 posts, RR: 18
Reply 4, posted (12 years 11 months 3 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 2653 times:

For the same reason, MD80s taxi with flaps extended. Anything thrown up by the wheels will hit the flaps and won't be sucked into an engine.


I wish I were flying
User currently offlineRapo From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 395 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (12 years 11 months 3 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 2631 times:

I saw these "chined" tires on a Fed Ex 727 at our local airshow. They look quite effective though I wonder if the would contribute to hydroplaning in deeper puddles.

rapo


User currently offlineFBU 4EVER! From Norway, joined Jan 2001, 998 posts, RR: 7
Reply 6, posted (12 years 11 months 3 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 2622 times:

In addition to deflecting water and slush,the deflector also deflects sand and gravel on snow covered runways here in Scandinavia,something a chined tire won't.
Additionally,there are deflectors on the maingear as well,not a "box"-like thing as on the nosewheel but a "T"-shaped bar mounted on the bottom of the main gear leg.All our DC-9 and MD-80/90 aircraft in SAS are so equipped.



"Luck and superstition wins all the time"!
User currently offlineMr Spaceman From Canada, joined Mar 2001, 2787 posts, RR: 9
Reply 7, posted (12 years 11 months 3 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 2606 times:

Hi Jwenting.

I find it pretty interesting that MD-80's would taxi with their flaps extended, to help deflect any spray (I suspect from the main gear tires), from being induced into the engines. I didn't think that they would ever taxi fast enough (especially in rain/slush), to cause a large amount of spray.

By flaps extended...Do you mean FUll flaps (past T/O setting), even when taxiing for departure?

Chris  Smile




"Just a minute while I re-invent myself"
User currently offlineTuffty From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2001, 92 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (12 years 11 months 3 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 2597 times:

the tyres also have a lip surrounding, on the side walls, them to throw the water away from the fuselage but the deflector will also play some part in this. alot of aircraft with low slung intakes have these deflectors to prevent damage.

regds tuffty Smile


User currently offlineZionstrat From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 226 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (12 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 2594 times:

Thanks everyone! Great input, more proof that there are no new questions and I've got to do better with the search engine-

MrSpaceman, what a great thread! I really appreciated the close up -

This site just gets better and better!


User currently offlineRydawg82 From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 864 posts, RR: 8
Reply 10, posted (12 years 11 months 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 2586 times:

Depends on the airline as far as flaps down on a MD80 during taxi...

Alaska or American and NWA, the primary OPS of the MD80 do not follow this process...

Ryan



You can take the pup out of Alaska, but you can't take the Alaska out of the pup.
User currently offlineCritter592 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (12 years 11 months 2 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 2570 times:

Everytime I would see an FL 717 at GPT I wondered what that thing was. It always mystified me, I plan on flying on another 717 this December...

User currently offlineFBU 4EVER! From Norway, joined Jan 2001, 998 posts, RR: 7
Reply 12, posted (12 years 11 months 2 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 2566 times:

Taxiing with flaps down is also performed by SAS.Before taxi,T/O flap setting and after landing the landing flap setting is used until approaching the gate.FOD prevention is not the main reason,by having the flaps down it will facilitate an emergency evacuation should something happen.The flaps make a nice slide.


"Luck and superstition wins all the time"!
Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic MD 80- What's On The Nosewheel?
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Tech/Ops related posts only!
  • Not Tech/Ops related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
What's On The Nose Of The A318/319/320/321? posted Wed Jan 21 2004 05:43:36 by Cancidas
What The.. What's With The Nosewheel? posted Fri Apr 11 2003 15:45:36 by Dufo
MD-80 Elevator Position On The Ground posted Mon Aug 28 2006 18:17:01 by ALbyDAL
What Are The MD-80 Fins? posted Sat May 17 2003 04:20:48 by Upsmd11
Sound On The MD-80 During Boarding posted Mon Jun 24 2002 23:25:08 by TWAalltheway
Tri-motor - What's That On The Wing? posted Thu Nov 9 2006 00:50:53 by TimePilot
What Are These Intakes For On The 777? posted Wed Nov 1 2006 04:13:28 by Gh123
What Is This Lump On The 737? posted Sun Oct 1 2006 13:18:37 by Monteycarlos
Object On Back Of MD-80 Nose Gear posted Fri Aug 4 2006 22:21:00 by WHPBUR
What's This Little Hump On The 747? posted Sat Jul 22 2006 18:48:45 by Alphafloor

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format