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Quick Question About The Taxi Stage Of Flight.  
User currently offlineTesko From Canada, joined Jul 2008, 19 posts, RR: 0
Posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 4807 times:
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Alright, when a pilot of a heavy is on a taxi does he manage all the throttles as separate throttles of which way he is turning or does he manage all the engines as one?

15 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 16908 posts, RR: 67
Reply 1, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 4780 times:

As I understand it it is all as one with the possible exception of some very tight turns where you might want more power on the outside of the turn.


"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineThebatman From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 834 posts, RR: 9
Reply 2, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 4500 times:
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Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 1):
As I understand it it is all as one with the possible exception of some very tight turns where you might want more power on the outside of the turn.

I'll have to kindly disagree. I'm not a pilot, but I do taxi every fleet type that my airline has (737,747,757,767,777,A319,A320). If you're on the taxi stage of flight, especially in a heavy airplane, the tendency to "die" in a turn is much higher than when you're arriving at your destination and have little fuel left. It is common practice to pull a little power on the corresponding engine to help you make a smooth turn. You could move all of the throttles at the same time, but this may cause you to speed up too rapidly, and then you'd have to hit the brakes. Again, it's much smoother to pull power only on the side you need.



A319,A320,B727,B732/3/5/7/8/9,B742/4,B752/3,B762/3,B772,CRJ2/7,DC9/MD80,DC10,E170
User currently offline411A From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 1826 posts, RR: 8
Reply 3, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 4491 times:

I depends on what the Captain decides...personally, when heavy (which is nearly always for us, for departure) I will use the outboard engine in turns.
Type, L1011.


User currently offlineCosmicCruiser From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 2254 posts, RR: 16
Reply 4, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 4490 times:



Quoting Thebatman (Reply 2):
I'm not a pilot, but I do taxi every fleet type that my airline has

OOOOOOOKAY

In the MD-11 as well as the DC-10 I rarely use assymetrical thrust in a turn. The "feel" you get is to KNOW that the momentum you have will take you thru the turn. When I first checked out in the -10 years ago I remember bogging down in an uphill turn because I didn't have the feel of the inertia yet. Now almost never is it a factor, I see the turn, look at the GS and know what thrust I'll need to make the turn. If I use one side more than the other it's rare.


User currently offlineThebatman From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 834 posts, RR: 9
Reply 5, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 4280 times:
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Quoting CosmicCruiser (Reply 4):
OOOOOOOKAY

Questions??



A319,A320,B727,B732/3/5/7/8/9,B742/4,B752/3,B762/3,B772,CRJ2/7,DC9/MD80,DC10,E170
User currently offlineFrancoflier From France, joined Oct 2001, 3613 posts, RR: 11
Reply 6, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 4227 times:

The general practice is to accelerate all engines simultaneously for taxi. The use of asymetical thrust would only be used in case of an extremely tight turn at low speed. The steering system on modern airliners is more than able to turn the nosewheel to full lock at a standstill.

Whenever taxying around an airport with a heavy jet you need to try and apply as little thrust as possible to avoid FOD behind you, and in that way it is better to use more engines at less thrust than one at a higher thrust.



Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit posting...
User currently offlineCosmicCruiser From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 2254 posts, RR: 16
Reply 7, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 4215 times:



Quoting Thebatman (Reply 5):
Questions??

My first thought was just MSFS but I see by your profile you're a line mech. Cool. Do they teach assymetrical thrust in the turns?


User currently offlineThebatman From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 834 posts, RR: 9
Reply 8, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 4138 times:
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Quoting CosmicCruiser (Reply 7):
Do they teach assymetrical thrust in the turns?

Yes, they do...if it's necessary. If you're taxiing an A320 with 8000 lbs of fuel on board, you're not going to touch the throttles (hardly) during the entire taxi ride. Now, if you're taxiing a 747-400 with 375,000 lbs of fuel, that's a different story.

Quoting CosmicCruiser (Reply 4):
The "feel" you get is to KNOW that the momentum you have will take you thru the turn.

Absolutely. That's hard to describe to someone who has never done it. You have to walk the fine line between carrying enough power to go through the turn, and not applying too much and blowing something or someone behind you away. Since UA is really pushing single-engine taxi, that makes turning even more challenging. But, with time comes experience, and with experience, "feel".



A319,A320,B727,B732/3/5/7/8/9,B742/4,B752/3,B762/3,B772,CRJ2/7,DC9/MD80,DC10,E170
User currently offlineCosmicCruiser From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 2254 posts, RR: 16
Reply 9, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 4132 times:

Like I said I rarely do it though I've had to do a 180 on the runway and used every available tool including assymetrical thrust. On the -11 if you're heavy you may find yourself at max thrust( 40%N1) for a ramp or congested area. We have had some cans blown into other things like planes and carts, etc. Y'all be careful now.

User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31568 posts, RR: 57
Reply 10, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 3904 times:



Quoting Thebatman (Reply 2):
I'm not a pilot, but I do taxi every fleet type that my airline has (737,747,757,767,777,A319,A320)

Is the Taxi permit issued per Aircraft type or over entire fleet.Here its the former.
regds
MEL.



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineMovingtin From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 183 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 3814 times:



Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 10):
Is the Taxi permit issued per Aircraft type or over entire fleet.Here its the former.
regds

Per A/C Type, with recurrent check rides required where i have worked.


User currently offlineThebatman From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 834 posts, RR: 9
Reply 12, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks ago) and read 3794 times:
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Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 10):
Is the Taxi permit issued per Aircraft type or over entire fleet

You need to take two weeks of training for each A/C type (one week- systems training, and one week - engine run/taxi). Then you will need to go on a series of check rides for each A/C. Also, here at ORD you need to take a 150-question taxi exam for the city that tests you on all the runways, taxiways etc. You'd better know where you're going out there! That test gives you a special ID badge that allows you to taxi A/C.



A319,A320,B727,B732/3/5/7/8/9,B742/4,B752/3,B762/3,B772,CRJ2/7,DC9/MD80,DC10,E170
User currently offlineValkyrie01 From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 72 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 3734 times:



Quoting Thebatman (Reply 12):
You need to take two weeks of training for each A/C type (one week- systems training, and one week - engine run/taxi). Then you will need to go on a series of check rides for each A/C. Also, here at ORD you need to take a 150-question taxi exam for the city that tests you on all the runways, taxiways etc. You'd better know where you're going out there! That test gives you a special ID badge that allows you to taxi A/C.

Do you get pay extra to taxi airplanes i know alot of the guy i work with who are taxi qualify gave it up because they were not getting any additional money for it. ie more responsibility etc and no compensation.



The best there is the best there was the best there ever will be
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31568 posts, RR: 57
Reply 14, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 3689 times:



Quoting Valkyrie01 (Reply 13):
Do you get pay extra to taxi airplanes i know alot of the guy i work with who are taxi qualify gave it up because they were not getting any additional money for it. ie more responsibility etc and no compensation.

There is no Taxi check permit holder allowance out here...Its considered a part of the job.
regds
MEL.



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineThebatman From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 834 posts, RR: 9
Reply 15, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 3647 times:
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Quoting Valkyrie01 (Reply 13):
Do you get pay extra to taxi airplanes

Some carriers (only regionals that I'm aware of) will give you something like 25 cents more an hour for being taxi-qualified. This is NOT the case at the airline I work for.



A319,A320,B727,B732/3/5/7/8/9,B742/4,B752/3,B762/3,B772,CRJ2/7,DC9/MD80,DC10,E170
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