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Nitrogen In Tires?  
User currently offlineSquigee From Canada, joined May 2001, 652 posts, RR: 4
Posted (12 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 2174 times:

I asked this question in the main forum and only got a partial. Is nitrogen used in tires? Why? More info, please!

Squigee


Someday, we'll look back at this, laugh nervously, and then change the subject.
8 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAJ From Australia, joined Nov 1999, 2391 posts, RR: 24
Reply 1, posted (12 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 2085 times:

Due to the high temperatures often reached in any aircraft tires rapidly expansive gases are not suitable. Many elements in air are rapidly expansive and would cause blowouts on most landings. Nitrogen is less expansive at high temperatures therefore perfect for aircraft tires.

User currently offlineMinuteman From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 271 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (12 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 2051 times:

Nitrogen is also not an oxidizer. This means if the pressurized gas from a tire decides to blow out onto the grease and dirt on a strut, which is also right next to a hot brake rotor, it shouldn't help anything burst into flames.

User currently offlineSquigee From Canada, joined May 2001, 652 posts, RR: 4
Reply 3, posted (12 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 1991 times:

Thanks guys,

that really clears it up!

Squigee



Someday, we'll look back at this, laugh nervously, and then change the subject.
User currently offlineAir2gxs From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (12 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 1950 times:

Nitrogen is also inert. As stated it will not burst into flames but, will not support combustion and will act as a smothering agent if a tire were to blow due to excessive heat in the W/W from a fire.


User currently offlineMetwrench From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 750 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (12 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 1933 times:

Air2gxs & Minutman, you are both right. Also N2 is devoid of moisture where as compressed air is full of water. Water can collect inside of a wheel/tire and create an imbalance. An out of balance tire on your car is obnoxious at 65 mph, you can imagine the effect at 120mph.

User currently offlineAvionic From Denmark, joined Nov 1999, 111 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (12 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 1903 times:

doesn´t some maintenance manuals allow other gasses then nitrogen to be filled on tires in case of no nitrogen available and on a line station?

User currently offlineAir2gxs From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (12 years 11 months 2 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 1857 times:

Yest, the MM does allow the substitution of air for N2 as long as the air is removed and replaced by N2 at the next available station.

User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (12 years 11 months 2 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 1873 times:

An object lesson in what can happen when you mix:

1/ Takeoff from a hot&high airport, and
2/ A dragging brake, and
3/ Air in the tires versus nitrogen.

http://aviation-safety.net/database/1986/860331-1.htm


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