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Boeing 777-300ER Underfloor Cargo Question  
User currently offlineReggaebird From Jamaica, joined Nov 1999, 1176 posts, RR: 0
Posted (4 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 13943 times:

While waiting for a flight at Sydney Airport recently, I noticed a non-palletized Lamborghini Gallardo being removed from the forward cargo hold of an Emirates 777-300ER.

see my video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sHuSpIZ7lgc

My question is, how does non-palletized cargo such as the car get secured in the cargo hold? Surely, it couldn't have flown without some restraints.

25 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineBrenintw From Taiwan, joined Jul 2006, 1647 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (4 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 13926 times:

Probably just used tie-down straps according to my air-freight guru.


I'm tired of the A vs. B sniping. Neither make planes that shed wings randomly!
User currently offlineBeeweel15 From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 1753 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (4 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 13839 times:



Quoting Reggaebird (Thread starter):
My question is, how does non-palletized cargo such as the car get secured in the cargo hold? Surely, it couldn't have flown without some restraints.

Well depending on the car you will have to manually position the car across two pallets which are secured and positioned in the belly of the aircraft. Once the car is moved into position and the brakes are set it is strapped down to the pallet.


User currently offlineOtnySASLHR From Spain, joined May 2007, 131 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (4 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 13474 times:



Quoting Beeweel15 (Reply 2):
Well depending on the car you will have to manually position the car across two pallets which are secured and positioned in the belly of the aircraft. Once the car is moved into position and the brakes are set it is strapped down to the pallet.

Yup! That's the way to do it! Works for any car.
Tony



oTny
User currently offlineReggaebird From Jamaica, joined Nov 1999, 1176 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (4 years 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 12956 times:



Quoting OtnySASLHR (Reply 3):
Quoting Beeweel15 (Reply 2):
Well depending on the car you will have to manually position the car across two pallets which are secured and positioned in the belly of the aircraft. Once the car is moved into position and the brakes are set it is strapped down to the pallet.

Yup! That's the way to do it! Works for any car.
Tony

Does the fuel tank have to be emptied? Is there any risk during turbulence?

Reggaebird


User currently onlineB777LRF From Luxembourg, joined Nov 2008, 1360 posts, RR: 3
Reply 5, posted (4 years 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 12887 times:

Fuel tank must be near-empty - I belive most airlines allow up to around 5 liters - and the battery must be disconnected. For Dangerous Goods purposes vehicles are Class 9.

The car will be strapped down to the pallet, and provided it's done correctly, there is no risk at all. It's a piece of cake really and done on a very regular basis. Last year we had a Ferrari Enzo BAH-BRU-BGY - owner (Bahrain royal family member) sent it up for service. Couple of weeks later we sent it back again. Sadly no keys in the ignition, otherwise .....  Wink



From receips and radials over straight pipes to big fans - been there, done that, got the hearing defects to prove
User currently offlinePanHAM From Germany, joined May 2005, 9386 posts, RR: 29
Reply 6, posted (4 years 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 12887 times:

The fuel tank has to be drained and the batteries have to be disconnected. The cars are tied down on regular flats (pallets) so that they cannot move during turbulence. The manual positioning onto the flats inside the lower hold is simply necessary because cars usually are overlapping and pallets have to go one by one into the hold.

On main deck loading, this is usually not a problem, if the aircraft can be nose loadsed, cars can be secured on 10' or 20' flats.



E's passed on! That parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! E's expired and gone to meet 'is maker!
User currently offlineVV701 From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2005, 7535 posts, RR: 17
Reply 7, posted (4 years 10 months 3 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 12561 times:

Does DHL fly all F1 cars?

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Photo © Inal Khaev - RuSpotters Team


For example how did the cars get from the Brazilian Grand Prix on 18 October first back to their home base and then on to the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix held last Sunday? If DHL do fly the cars and as they only operate two-engined aircraft are some of these approved for ETOPS operation?


User currently offlinePnwtraveler From Canada, joined Jun 2007, 2241 posts, RR: 12
Reply 8, posted (4 years 10 months 3 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 12530 times:

I remember seeing all sorts of vehicles arrive via AC Cargo. All as described above on the metal pallets. Ferrari's and other exotics. I have also watched SMART cars unloaded from the LH747's before they were officially offered in Canada. I couldn't see the pallets they were on but certainly they were so small they didn't need the large pallets.

User currently offlineHNL2BOS From United States of America, joined Nov 2009, 27 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (4 years 10 months 3 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 12498 times:
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Isnt the car being pushed around on its tie down pallet?

User currently onlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 31001 posts, RR: 86
Reply 10, posted (4 years 10 months 3 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 12398 times:
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Quoting VV701 (Reply 7):
Does DHL fly all F1 cars?

Yes, DHL handles Formula One Management's air freight, which includes the cars, engines and spare components, pit equipment, tool cabinets, fuel trolleys, timing stands and radio systems. Items that are either hazardous or available "on site" (screens, wiring, trolleys, generators, and tables) are shipped by sea because they are not time-sensitive and if they don't arrive, FOM can source replacements at the host venue.

The German show Inside Grand Prix did a segment on how DHL ships Toyota F1's stuff from their base in Cologne, Germany to the "fly-away" races.


User currently offlineAirTran737 From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 3704 posts, RR: 12
Reply 11, posted (4 years 10 months 3 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 12340 times:
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I did a load of cars out of DXB two months ago, and it was a pain in the ass. We put PMC's on the entire main deck, with PYB's in the doorway. We also had 5 car carriers which hold two cars each. We put a grand total of 24 cars on the main deck, two in the lower forward, and one in the lower aft. This was all on a 747-400, non-nose loader. Let's just say, a Nissan Altima is a bitch to get in and out of the lower deck, but we were able to drive them both ways.

Quoting Reggaebird (Reply 4):
Does the fuel tank have to be emptied? Is there any risk during turbulence?

The fuel tank will always have some gas left in it, so that the car can be driven in and out. As for turbulence, there isn't any risk. The cars get two straps through each rim to hold it in place, it's not going anywhere. Besides, we carry way more dangerous stuff than cars. reading our NOTAC's is always a good time, especially when they are five pages long.



Nice Trip Report!!! Great Pics, thanks for posting!!!! B747Forever
User currently offlineDC8FanJet From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 397 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 11932 times:



Quoting HNL2BOS (Reply 9):
Isnt the car being pushed around on its tie down pallet

Definitely a pallet underneath the car. Straps and tie-downs were removed before the
video started.

There is no "floor" in the cargo hold for the car to sit on, it would have to be on a pallet.


User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15744 posts, RR: 27
Reply 13, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 11925 times:



Quoting DC8FanJet (Reply 12):
There is no "floor" in the cargo hold for the car to sit on, it would have to be on a pallet.

It is certainly easier to secure a pallet to the plane and the car to the pallet than it is to secure a car straight to the plane.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offline474218 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 6340 posts, RR: 9
Reply 14, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 11883 times:



Quoting HNL2BOS (Reply 9):
Isnt the car being pushed around on its tie down pallet?

Yes

Quoting BMI727 (Reply 13):
It is certainly easier to secure a pallet to the plane and the car to the pallet than it is to secure a car straight to the plane.

Cargo floors are thin aluminum sheets between the container rails. They are there to provide a fire break and keep trash out of the bilge area. There is no way the cargo compartment floor would support the weight of a car.


User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25338 posts, RR: 22
Reply 15, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 11840 times:

A few relevant photos:







User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15744 posts, RR: 27
Reply 16, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 11828 times:

Somewhere I read a story about a freighter pilot who noticed there was an exotic car in the hold. He decided to check it out during the flight and somehow got himself locked in. The other pilot then had to perform an emergency landing.

Does anyone know if this story is true or not? It sounds like an urban myth to me, but stranger things have happened.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently onlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 31001 posts, RR: 86
Reply 17, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 11811 times:
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Quoting BMI727 (Reply 16):
Does anyone know if this story is true or not? It sounds like an urban myth to me, but stranger things have happened.

I dont see how it would be possible, since you can manually unlock the car from the inside.


User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15744 posts, RR: 27
Reply 18, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 11803 times:



Quoting Stitch (Reply 17):
I dont see how it would be possible, since you can manually unlock the car from the inside.

I recall that the story said that the car was a replacement for one that had been stolen, and was specially fitted with a system that would lock the doors automatically unless the key was put in the ignition or something like that.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineADent From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 1386 posts, RR: 2
Reply 19, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 11692 times:



Quoting Stitch (Reply 17):
I dont see how it would be possible, since you can manually unlock the car from the inside.

Not many BMWs.

We had our family car air shipped. Mom worked for UA and moved from LAX to CHI. Rather than paying to ship the car or pay us to drive it, UA air shipped it (space available) on their own freighter.


User currently offline413x3 From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 1983 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 11679 times:

I would tell those rampers to get their dirty hands off my baby!! I hope they didn't scratch her, looks like they manhandled her

User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17040 posts, RR: 66
Reply 21, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 11610 times:

See here for a great a.nut article about "Little Amy", a DC-8 flying around the Marshall Islands. There are pics of loading/offloading with their makeshift ramp.

http://www.airliners.net/aviation-articles/read.main?id=52A

http://www.airliners.net/articles/graphics/RAMPONE.jpg
http://www.airliners.net/articles/graphics/RAMPCLOS.jpg



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineRwessel From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 2353 posts, RR: 2
Reply 22, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 11589 times:
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Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 21):
See here for a great a.nut article about "Little Amy", a DC-8 flying around the Marshall Islands. There are pics of loading/offloading with their makeshift ramp.

Didn't Dan-Air used to run a cross-channel car ferry service with Comets?


User currently offlineTristarSteve From Sweden, joined Nov 2005, 4009 posts, RR: 33
Reply 23, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 11539 times:



Quoting Rwessel (Reply 22):
Didn't Dan-Air used to run a cross-channel car ferry service with Comets?

No. It was run from Lydd in England to Le Touquet in France by a firm that was called British Air ferries at the end. Originally with Bristol Freighters and latterly with converted DC4s with nose loading doors.
The cars were driven up a ramp in through the nose, and the drivers and pax travelled on board.


User currently offlineFX772LRF From United States of America, joined Apr 2009, 675 posts, RR: 12
Reply 24, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 11445 times:



Quoting TristarSteve (Reply 23):

Which would be this:


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Photo © Phil Rix



-Noah  wave 



Cleared to IAH via CLL 076 radial/BAZBL/RIICE3, up to 3k, 7k in 10, departure on 134.3, squawk 4676, Colgan 9581.
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25338 posts, RR: 22
Reply 25, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 11427 times:



Quoting FX772LRF (Reply 24):
Quoting TristarSteve (Reply 23):


Which would be this:

And, previously, this:


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Photo © Phil Rix



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