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Turbine Engines: Status Of Material Science  
User currently offlineFaro From Egypt, joined Aug 2007, 1584 posts, RR: 0
Posted (5 years 1 week 23 hours ago) and read 3737 times:

Beyond GTF, open rotors and contra-rotating stages, what innovations in materials are presently being R&D'ed by turbine engine manufacturers? Which of these innovations can we reasonably expect to see implemented within the next 5 years and which between 5-10 years?

Faro


The chalice not my son
8 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineOly720man From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 6840 posts, RR: 11
Reply 1, posted (5 years 1 week 22 hours ago) and read 3719 times:

Improved high temperature coatings for turbine blades seems to be one that has promise.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/ar...d=thermal-barrier-coating-zirconia



wheat and dairy can screw up your brain
User currently offlineFaro From Egypt, joined Aug 2007, 1584 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (5 years 1 week 19 hours ago) and read 3697 times:



Quoting Oly720man (Reply 1):
Improved high temperature coatings for turbine blades seems to be one that has promise.

Very interesting development, I wonder when we may see it implemented. Any other technology candidates out there?

I wonder whether materials science has reached a plateau with respect to turbines, it seems that most of future efficiencies will be coming from innovations in mechanics rather than materials. At one point I believe that advances in turbine technology were to a large extent due to advances in materials.

Faro



The chalice not my son
User currently offlineTdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 80
Reply 3, posted (5 years 1 week 6 hours ago) and read 3640 times:



Quoting Faro (Thread starter):
Beyond GTF, open rotors and contra-rotating stages, what innovations in materials are presently being R&D'ed by turbine engine manufacturers?

In addition to better coatings, they're always playing with the airfoils...3D airfoils are just starting to become the norm and I would suspect they'll keep tweaking that for some time to come.

Blisks are partly manufacturing, partly material, but promise significant weight savings...I'm not sure if they're in the commercial world yet but they're in military engines now.

The easy material advances seem to be behind us...if they can ever get ceramics to play nice, that will be a huge leap though.

Tom.


User currently offlineDTManiac From Germany, joined Aug 2004, 689 posts, RR: 15
Reply 4, posted (4 years 12 months 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 3365 times:



Quoting Tdscanuck (Reply 3):
if they can ever get ceramics to play nice, that will be a huge leap though.

I guess the same would apply for TiAl alloys. Research is still performed on that. If one manages to increase ductility a bit this might open up a new range of applications. The low weight could lead to a significant weight reduction and thus fuel burn.



Gig 'em Aggies!!!
User currently offlineJetlife2 From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 221 posts, RR: 25
Reply 5, posted (4 years 12 months 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 3220 times:



Quoting Tdscanuck (Reply 3):
In addition to better coatings, they're always playing with the airfoils...3D airfoils are just starting to become the norm and I would suspect they'll keep tweaking that for some time to come.

Blisks are partly manufacturing, partly material, but promise significant weight savings...I'm not sure if they're in the commercial world yet but they're in military engines now.

The easy material advances seem to be behind us...if they can ever get ceramics to play nice, that will be a huge leap though.

This is a good list. 1. 3D aero: evident in all the latest fan blades (GE90-115B, GEnx) and continues on the inside, gets better every generation; 2. Blisks: Yes they are in many commercial engines already. The GE90-115B has a first stage compressor blisk as big as some engine's fan stages...GEnx has more stages as blisks. 3. Ceramics: Definitely on the list for the future. Many technology demonstrators have been run and they are in use already in some military engines. Still some hurdles to overcome (cost being one) 4. Materials science in general (metals): the state of the art now is that properties can be predicted from chemistry, thus allowing the alloy to be designed and optimized before making any; (composites) Just getting better and better. Analysis techniques have grown up and now they are not only practical but desirable from all angles: weight, strength, cost. You will see more and more of the engine going this way.

Very good topic, thanks for asking.


User currently offlineFaro From Egypt, joined Aug 2007, 1584 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (4 years 12 months 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 3181 times:



Quoting Jetlife2 (Reply 5):
3. Ceramics: Definitely on the list for the future. Many technology demonstrators have been run and they are in use already in some military engines. Still some hurdles to overcome (cost being one)

Very interesting, in use on which operational military engines exactly? In the hot end I presume, but as lining or turbine blade?

Faro



The chalice not my son
User currently offlineJetlife2 From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 221 posts, RR: 25
Reply 7, posted (4 years 12 months 8 hours ago) and read 3034 times:

This public domain paper from GE Energy is an excellent source. Many of the materials mentioned are used in aircraft applications.

http://www.gepower.com/prod_serv/pro...ech_docs/en/downloads/ger3569g.pdf


User currently offlineAutothrust From Switzerland, joined Jun 2006, 1603 posts, RR: 9
Reply 8, posted (4 years 12 months ago) and read 2994 times:



Quoting Faro (Reply 6):
Very interesting, in use on which operational military engines exactly? In the hot end I presume, but as lining or turbine blade?

The EJ200 features ceramics in the HP compressor, aswell as Blisks and other advanced technologies.



“Faliure is not an option.”
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