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787 Manufacture, Vacuum Bags In Autoclave?  
User currently offlineTrex8 From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 4745 posts, RR: 14
Posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 2943 times:
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won't they melt???

http://money.cnn.com/galleries/2008/....boeing_dreamliner.fortune/13.html

7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6370 posts, RR: 3
Reply 1, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 2937 times:

You know, my wife made our Thanksgiving turkey dinner in a plastic bag that baked in an oven all afternoon at 350 degrees Farenheit, and the turkey came out delicious (nice and moist), and no one in our immediate family fell sick from poisioning...  Smile The point being that, there are some plastics that can take high temperatures...


Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
User currently offlinePrebennorholm From Denmark, joined Mar 2000, 6421 posts, RR: 54
Reply 2, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 2932 times:

Dear Trex8, there are some basic CFRP production techniques which you need to study. You can easily find it with google.


Always keep your number of landings equal to your number of take-offs, Preben Norholm
User currently offlineTrex8 From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 4745 posts, RR: 14
Reply 3, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 3 days ago) and read 2897 times:
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Quoting Prebennorholm (Reply 2):
Dear Trex8, there are some basic CFRP production techniques which you need to study. You can easily find it with google.

thanks, so do the 787 parts get baked at the low temps I found googling, 120 deg C , or at the much higher ones - some were up to 250+


User currently offlineNomadd22 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 1846 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 3 days ago) and read 2879 times:

Nice article, but the first caption "When it's finished, the 787, also known as the Dreamliner will fly further on less fuel than any existing jet" kinda makes you wonder just how stupid a reporter can be.


Andy Goetsch
User currently offlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 30877 posts, RR: 86
Reply 5, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 2837 times:
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Quoting Trex8 (Reply 3):
so do the 787 parts get baked at the low temps I found googling, 120 deg C , or at the much higher ones - some were up to 250+

It's actually around 200°C / 400°F for the 787's parts.


User currently offlineTdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 80
Reply 6, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 2835 times:



Quoting Trex8 (Thread starter):
won't they melt???

Not all plastics melt at low temperatures. Depending on the specific polymer, thermoplastics can go up above oven temperatures, and thermoset plastics don't melt at all (they just eventually burn).

Quoting Trex8 (Reply 3):
thanks, so do the 787 parts get baked at the low temps I found googling, 120 deg C , or at the much higher ones - some were up to 250+

Prepreg aerospace composites normally cure at 350 degF.

Tom.


User currently offlineSoon7x7 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 2830 times:



Quoting Tdscanuck (Reply 6):

Different epoxy compounds together with various fabrics along with the use of the part, its location on the airframe and its intended lifespan all call for different curing rates and temperatures. Some components are CFRP's, others are a matrix of carbon , Kevlar and fiberglass while still, some are just fibreglass. Many different resins along with fillers, aluminum powder, all add to the complexity of cure rates. Composites are such a science that in my personal opinion, its an artform. You also don't need an autoclave to create all the parts...just a mold and vacuum bag. Look up "Heatcons" Website and read about this...its interesting reading. Pretty amazing when you consider you mix two liquids, part A and part B epoxy, impregnate fabric off a roll, bake, and out pops a 787!...although grossly simplistic...thats sort of what is happening...  yes 


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