Sponsor Message:
Aviation Technical / Operations Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Are 707 And 727 Shaky In Climb?  
User currently offline747400sp From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 3602 posts, RR: 2
Posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 3822 times:

I was told, that even when they were new, 707s and 727s, was very shaky during their climb. Is this true?

15 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineFtrguy From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 358 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 3796 times:

I fly 707's and if there's turbulence, yes its shaky.

User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6372 posts, RR: 3
Reply 2, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 3788 times:

The absolute shakiest takeoff I have ever experienced was SQ1...a fully laden 747-400 (max. takeoff weight) out of SFO...the tail wags a lot on a fully loaded pretty good, for some reason  Wink


Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
User currently offlineYodobashi From UK - Scotland, joined Sep 2007, 237 posts, RR: 3
Reply 3, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 3774 times:

Ive flown on a good few 727's and can only say good about them.

OK so they're noisier than your 'modern jet' but in terms of smooth flying, I can't say I ever noticed them being more or less so that anything we fly in regularly today.



"The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page"
User currently offlineRcair1 From United States of America, joined Oct 2009, 1317 posts, RR: 52
Reply 4, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 3444 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
CUSTOMER SERVICE & SUPPORT



Quoting 747400sp (Thread starter):
I was told, that even when they were new, 707s and 727s, was very shaky during their climb. Is this true?

Sorry - what the heck is "shaky" mean. Vibration. Buffet? I'm confused by it.



rcair1
User currently offlineTb727 From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 1588 posts, RR: 9
Reply 5, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 3416 times:

The 727 can be very shaky up front on takeoff depending on how much weight is on the nose
gear and the airplane. My first flight flying the airplane I was surprised how bumpy it was, now's it's just normal.

Climb out is fine, unless like said above, there is some turbulence. Then most of the time there is a side to side movement. It feels cool.



Too lazy to work, too scared to steal!
User currently offlineUAL747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (4 years 7 months 2 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 3094 times:

I'm just wondering: How a 727 vs. a 737-800 would be any shakier given the same circumstances?

User currently offlineThirtyEcho From United States of America, joined Dec 2001, 1649 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (4 years 7 months 2 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 3045 times:

Shaky? Do you mean a pronounced yaw moment, or what? I have flown hundreds of flights, in both types, and I have never experienced that sort of thing. In fact, there was no better ride in turbulence than in the 707 and the 727.

User currently offlineJayeshrulz From India, joined Apr 2007, 1027 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (4 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 2966 times:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=glEopY2yg0g

If you find the 707/727 shaky,Check out the takeoff of this A346...



Keep flying, because the sky is no limit!
User currently offline411A From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 1826 posts, RR: 8
Reply 9, posted (4 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 2945 times:

Shakey?

Well, it depends.

Circa 1979, after takeoff from Madras India, passing through about 6000 feet....B707-320B (advanced cowl).
Extreme turbulence.
I can't read the instruments..
The First Officer can't read the instruments, either....and he's flying the airplane.
Like a cork in the ocean...lucky to keep the blue side up.
The First Officer does well, keeping the proper attitude on the ADI.
I look out at the left wing...and note it is flexing waaaay up and down, and the engine pods are doing the typical pod-nod, that you notice in turbulence.

I recall thinking...good thing Boeing bolted the wings on REALLY tight in Seattle, long ago.

Then, just as suddenly as it started, the turbulence stopped.

Another day...another dollar.
And, keep the shoulder harness firmly fastened after takeoff...as you never know what might be in store at lower levels.


User currently offlineGemuser From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 5640 posts, RR: 6
Reply 10, posted (4 years 7 months 2 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 2818 times:



Quoting 747400sp (Thread starter):
I was told, that even when they were new, 707s and 727s, was very shaky during their climb. Is this true?

I wouldn't call a B727 shaky on climb out, certainly no more so that a B73G or 8 or A320, under normal circumstances. Now on the runway, that's a very different matter, particularly on a max performance take off, when the pilot has the engines to full power with the breaks jammed on. Now that's SHAKY! Every thing shakes, the walls, the seats, the pax, the overheads and if you look out the window at that amazing wing with all the slats, flaps etc deployed, they all shake too! Now combine that with a short field take off where he gets it off the ground asap, pulls in the gear and accelerates in ground effect, now that's shaky too.

B727-100 THE best jet liner EVER!  Smile

Gemuser



DC23468910;B72172273373G73873H74374475275376377L77W;A319 320321332333343;BAe146;C402;DHC6;F27;L188;MD80MD85
User currently offlineUAL747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 2698 times:

Ha, yeah, if we are talking about the "shaky" where you are at takeoff thrust with brakes applied, try sitting in the last row of a 777. I was nearly bounced out of my seat!

UAL


User currently offlinePITIngres From United States of America, joined Dec 2007, 1139 posts, RR: 13
Reply 12, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 2657 times:



Quoting Gemuser (Reply 10):
...a max performance take off, when the pilot has the engines to full power with the brakes jammed on...

You're talking about a normal departure from SNA, then, right?  Smile

One of the things I miss about my previous-1 job is taking off out of SNA. It was always amusing to hear how different pilots would explain what was going to happen, for the sake of the infrequent flyer pax. Once I sat next to some poor guy who was an uneasy flyer at best, and he nearly had a coronary. I spent a good 15 minutes explaining how the plane wasn't really going to shake itself to bits.

Interesting question, would a 707 or 727 be OK with SNA's puny little runway? Would they be weight limited at all? (Let's agree to ignore the noise factor, the thought of a JT3C-equipped 707 thrashing Newport Beach is pleasing but it would use up the noise quota for a year...)



Fly, you fools! Fly!
User currently offline411A From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 1826 posts, RR: 8
Reply 13, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 2633 times:



Quoting PITIngres (Reply 12):
Would they be weight limited at all?

Weight limited most certainly.
Example.
B707-320, JT4A-17 engines.
MTOW, 317,000 pounds, standard day, sea level, no wind, requires....11,300 feet of runway.
SNA would be just a tad short.


User currently offlineGemuser From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 5640 posts, RR: 6
Reply 14, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 2604 times:



Quoting PITIngres (Reply 12):

You're talking about a normal departure from SNA, then, right?

Actually POM in the 60s.  Smile

Slightly under 7,000' runway, sea level, but very hot 38C+, light to no wind, B721 at near if not at MTOW (every seat full) for a 1500 nm sector non stop to SYD. Talk about shake! And it kept up while he kept it in ground effect, once established in climb, very smooth.

Gemuser



DC23468910;B72172273373G73873H74374475275376377L77W;A319 320321332333343;BAe146;C402;DHC6;F27;L188;MD80MD85
User currently offlineSeaBosDca From United States of America, joined exactly 7 years ago today! , 5410 posts, RR: 4
Reply 15, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 2582 times:

Shaky? Try the back row of a stretch 8 or 753.

Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic Are 707 And 727 Shaky In Climb?
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Tech/Ops related posts only!
  • Not Tech/Ops related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
How Similar Are The 707 And The 720? posted Sat Aug 5 2006 19:28:57 by Duke
707 And Dc8 Handling Problems posted Thu Oct 2 2008 18:34:46 by B767
Engine MRO And Its Development In Todays Market posted Fri May 16 2008 02:40:35 by NicoEDDF
How Did The B-707 And DC-8 Influence Each Other? posted Fri Dec 14 2007 14:23:35 by Blackbird
Info On 707 Testing 727 Engines posted Wed Dec 6 2006 16:39:20 by Nosedive
The 707 And 720 Compared posted Mon Jun 19 2006 12:46:45 by Duke
Virgin Global Flyer And That Hole In The Tank... posted Sat Feb 11 2006 16:07:01 by Starlionblue
Are Trijets Easier To Fly In Engine Failure posted Fri Jan 27 2006 02:44:05 by Newagebird
How Similar Are 757 And 767 Cockpits? posted Tue Dec 6 2005 18:17:46 by Mozart
Are Newly Built Aircraft Covered In Film? posted Wed Sep 7 2005 19:11:35 by Braybuddy

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format