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Private Pilot Checkride  
User currently offlinen83sf From United States of America, joined Dec 2008, 72 posts, RR: 0
Posted (4 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 11420 times:

So unfortunately I failed my private pilot checkride today, and have to re-take it. If I am planning on being a commercial pilot, will this hurt my chances of getting a job? Do many people fail checkrides?

Any help is greatly appreciated.

N83SF


N83SF
14 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinelowrider From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 3220 posts, RR: 10
Reply 1, posted (4 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 11425 times:

So long as it is not a pattern of repeated failures, no. You will probably be asked to explain it, just admit your mistakes, try to demonstrate that you learned something, and press on. The more successful checkrides you rack up, the less significant this will be. I failed my initial CFI checkride.

The most important thing to do right now is to figure out how you are going to pass the next one. Schedule a date and talk to your instructor about what retraining you need.



Proud OOTSK member
User currently offlinegoldenshield From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 5970 posts, RR: 14
Reply 2, posted (4 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 11418 times:

The examiner explained what you messed up on, right? He should have, as your CFI has to know what to fix so that you can retake the test.


Two all beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun.
User currently offlineAirportugal310 From Palau, joined Apr 2004, 3587 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (4 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 11392 times:

Mind me asking what you were failed for?

I failed the stage check prior to my certification flight for picking a road as a good place to land with the engine 'out'. I was in hilly NH, so I went with what I thought was better than the alternate. Apparently the CFI I was with thought the upsloping hill next to the road was better, but with the skills I had, I know I would have plowed right into it the wrong way...thats me being honest. This required me to go do a flight or two on engine outs and must have done 5 or 6 of them in the process to satisfy the school.

I then went on to pass my PPL checkride no problem, and did a great job at engine out  

Dont worry about the failed checkride. Letting it get to you and thinking about what your future holds is the worst thing you could do to yourself! Keep at it and it will all be alright!!!



I sell airplanes and airplane accessories
User currently offlineTb727 From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 1576 posts, RR: 9
Reply 4, posted (4 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 11391 times:

Yeah, don't worry about it. Did you fail on a flight or oral portion of the ride? You have plenty of more rides to go like lowrider said. Who knows, you could go out and nail that really hard CFI ride when you take it and won't even remember today after that!


Too lazy to work, too scared to steal!
User currently offlineThirtyEcho From United States of America, joined Dec 2001, 1644 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (4 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 11372 times:

We simply need more info. Did you ram the airplane into the gas truck and blow up the hangar? Maybe, you just forgot to put in the gust lock after the flight? How can we know without more input from you?

User currently offlineSLUAviator From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 357 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (4 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 11342 times:

Hey man,

I failed my private checkride. I have now interviewed at 3 airlines and have been offered 3 pilot jobs. Failing a checkride is not a career ending event. You will be asked about failing checkrides at interviews. Instructor jobs, airlines, corporate gigs, they will ask if you have ever failed a checkride. There is one trick to answering questions about it.... your failing your checkride is YOUR fault. It was a mistake YOU made, a standard YOU did not meet. Never, never, never, never blame the examiner. Even if the guy was the biggest a-hole you have ever come across and you did not stand a snow ball's chance in hell of passing that day. You need to show you understand you made a mistake, you take responsibility for it and most importantly show you learned from the experience. Do that and you will be golden. Don't sweat a failure. Learn from it, and move on. Everyone has an off day.

Good luck wtih your retest, and get cracking on your instrument!



What do I know? I just fly 'em.......
User currently offlinepilotpip From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 3148 posts, RR: 11
Reply 7, posted (4 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 11306 times:

Don't sweat it. They happen from time to time.

I failed my CFI initial. Twice. Never had a problem getting an instructing job, never had a problem getting an airline job.

Make it a learning experience. Learn from whatever you didn't do up to PTS standards, don't repeat it and become a better pilot because of it. Hopefully the examiner sent you on the right path during the debrief after the ride and gave you some good tips. SLUaviator's advice is also spot on. Those Parks guys are pretty smart  



DMI
User currently offlinen83sf From United States of America, joined Dec 2008, 72 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (4 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 11251 times:

I was failed for the landings. The runway was smaller and narrower than I'm used to, so I ended up coming in high for my approaches, which also meant I had a higher than normal airspeed.


N83SF
User currently offlineAirportugal310 From Palau, joined Apr 2004, 3587 posts, RR: 2
Reply 9, posted (4 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days ago) and read 11221 times:

Quoting n83sf (Reply 8):
I was failed for the landings. The runway was smaller and narrower than I'm used to, so I ended up coming in high for my approaches, which also meant I had a higher than normal airspeed.

Yes, those 150'-200' wide runways give one oh so much breathing room, but the second you go to something 50' or less its like "what the heck?"



I sell airplanes and airplane accessories
User currently offlineTb727 From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 1576 posts, RR: 9
Reply 10, posted (4 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days ago) and read 11219 times:

Quoting n83sf (Reply 8):
I was failed for the landings. The runway was smaller and narrower than I'm used to, so I ended up coming in high for my approaches, which also meant I had a higher than normal airspeed.

Well that's not that bad. That is something you need to see and experience as you build time. At the stage you are at, some things you have probably only seen a couple times and that will happen as you go through bigger airplanes and learn those. Humps in the runway and landing on bad up/down slopes are some other ones. Those will get you the first time you see them in each type of airplane you fly I have noticed. Believe me, you remember the next time you face that situation. That's how you learn and that is how you become a better pilot!



Too lazy to work, too scared to steal!
User currently offlinesoon7x7 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (4 years 3 months 2 weeks 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 11189 times:

Quoting n83sf (Thread starter):

Remember that many flight instructors are well seasoned and will use their own experience, despite the FAA mandates, to judge your judgement during the test. Sometimes the given situation you have misjudged can only correctly be viewed through much flight experience which as a newbie...you don't have...don't let it bother you...doesn't mean your a bad pilot or you exercise bad judgement, I feel he should have given you a second go around to let you relax and select a different engine out location to evaluate if your just not good at selecting a viable put down spot.

The day of my exam, we had sustained 25 knot winds w/ gusts to 35. I was the only student that didn't cancel that day...my instructor said he should pass me just on that basis that I did not cancel. He also was 275 lbs and I had to off load fuel to be legal with him. I did fine and passed w/out issues. He asked me why I did not cancel...I told him that I had 5000 hours of glider time under my belt and I felt fine in those conditions. I've flown up your neck of the woods and not much in choices if powerplant craps out...tree tops may be your best bet...good luck...g


User currently offlineGulfstream650 From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2008, 537 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (4 years 3 months 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 10705 times:

Quoting n83sf (Reply 8):
I was failed for the landings. The runway was smaller and narrower than I'm used to, so I ended up coming in high for my approaches, which also meant I had a higher than normal airspeed.

Thankfully I passed mine first time although there were a few things that I thought that I had failed on but in the US YOU ONLY FAIL WHEN YOU HAVE BEEN TOLD THAT YOU HAVE FAILED.

If I was you, go and rent a plane (pref the same one) and go and fly to the same airport and practice. Try and work out what airport the examiner will take you to for your landings before and go and practice on your own.

Good luck and remember, a good pilot is a self-critical one.

The BEST pilots in the world are the SAFEST pilots in the world - above all that's the key.



I don't proclaim to be the best pilot in the world but I'm safe
User currently offlineRJ111 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (4 years 3 months 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 10626 times:

Unlikely that airlines will care about PPL. IR and CPL perhaps but even then as long as it's not a repeated thing you can still get your foot in the door.

In fact Airlines probably only care that you have the licences and you're willing to sell your soul to the Airline for as small a salary as possible.


User currently offlinee38 From United States of America, joined May 2008, 327 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (4 years 3 months 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 10602 times:

N83SF: Above all, never lie or try to hide the fact during an interview that you did not pass a checkride. Of course, you don't want to go into an interview and say, "Good morning, I'm John Smith and I failed my private pilot checkride," but if it does come up, be honest about it, take responsibility for it, and let them know it was very much a learning experience. You really need to capitalize on how you grew and matured from the experience. Interviewers like to see how you can handle an adverse, unpleasant event. I know it's painful, but never act like you are bitter about it (even if you are). And, it won't come up at every interview.

Not just for an interview, but even right now, try to make something positive out of this and use it as a meaningful learning experience.

To answer your questions, " will this hurt my chances of getting a job? Do many people fail checkrides?" in reverse order, the answers are,

"Do many people fail checkrides?" Yes, and

"Will this hurt my chances of getting a job?" No, but it's entirely up to you as to how you address the issue if it comes up, i.e., your attitude.

e38


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