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Seaplane Take-off Method  
User currently offlinexero9 From Canada, joined Feb 2007, 153 posts, RR: 0
Posted (4 years 4 months 1 week 16 hours ago) and read 4911 times:

Hey all,

Someone recently sent me a link to this YouTube video which I thought was a pretty interesting way to get a seaplane up in the air.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3rejexLISJs

Anyone else have any interesting take off videos like this? Do share if you do 

15 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineUAL747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (4 years 4 months 1 week 16 hours ago) and read 4887 times:

I thought that sea planes have wheels that extend from underneath the pontoons. Am I incorrect?

User currently offlinexero9 From Canada, joined Feb 2007, 153 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (4 years 4 months 1 week 16 hours ago) and read 4869 times:

I'm by no means an expert, but I thought there were two kinds.. One that had wheels that retracted into the pontoons (or maybe on the front and back of them), but also ones that had pontoons with no wheels at all. I'm pretty sure in FSX I tried using the built-in seaplane and couldn't get it to go down the runway because it's lack of wheels.

User currently offlinethegman From United States of America, joined Nov 2008, 657 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (4 years 4 months 1 week 16 hours ago) and read 4855 times:

Quoting UAL747 (Reply 1):
I thought that sea planes have wheels that extend from underneath the pontoons. Am I incorrect?

Some do, some don't.


User currently offlineN353SK From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 821 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (4 years 4 months 1 week 15 hours ago) and read 4841 times:

Usually "Seaplane" means no wheels and "Amphibious" means the floats have wheels.

User currently offlinexero9 From Canada, joined Feb 2007, 153 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (4 years 4 months 1 week 15 hours ago) and read 4835 times:

Quoting N353SK (Reply 4):
Usually "Seaplane" means no wheels and "Amphibious" means the floats have wheels.

Ah, that makes sense. Not sure why someone wouldn't get an amphibious plane then. You get the best of both worlds. Or is there a reason someone might want a seaplane?


User currently offlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21571 posts, RR: 55
Reply 6, posted (4 years 4 months 1 week 14 hours ago) and read 4779 times:

Quoting xero9 (Reply 5):
Not sure why someone wouldn't get an amphibious plane then. You get the best of both worlds. Or is there a reason someone might want a seaplane?

Simplicity. Less stuff to maintain, less stuff to worry about, etc.

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently offline71Zulu From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 3079 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (4 years 4 months 1 week 14 hours ago) and read 4773 times:

Quoting xero9 (Reply 5):
Not sure why someone wouldn't get an amphibious plane then.

And a lot more money too. Lots of seaplanes are floats only.

And how do you put them in the water?

With one of these,


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © John Olafson
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Colin Parker - The HongKong Spotters




The good old days: Delta L-1011s at MSY
User currently offline413X3 From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 1983 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (4 years 4 months 1 week 11 hours ago) and read 4665 times:

It must be a fake! I don't see a treadmill

User currently offlineArrow From Canada, joined Jun 2002, 2676 posts, RR: 2
Reply 9, posted (4 years 4 months 1 week 11 hours ago) and read 4662 times:
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I think we're mixing metaphors here.

A seaplane is a plane with a hull designed to land on water. It may or may not be amphibious. Grumman Goose comes to mind, and it is amphibious.

A floatplane is a plane with the wheels removed and floats installed instead. Twin Otter, Beaver, a few Cessnas, etc. Some of them are amphibious, with retractable wheels in the floats, but most are just floatplanes. I think the amphibious floats are pretty expensive, and pretty heavy. I think somebody put floats on a DC-3 a few years ago.



Never let the facts get in the way of a good story.
User currently offlinedoug_Or From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 3403 posts, RR: 3
Reply 10, posted (4 years 4 months 1 week 11 hours ago) and read 4650 times:

Quoting Arrow (Reply 9):
A seaplane is a plane with a hull designed to land on water. It may or may not be amphibious. Grumman Goose comes to mind, and it is amphibious.

I thought that was a flying boat and seaplane was anything with wings that lands on water.



When in doubt, one B pump off
User currently offlineElpinDAB From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 473 posts, RR: 4
Reply 11, posted (4 years 4 months 1 week 7 hours ago) and read 4563 times:

Quoting xero9 (Reply 5):
Or is there a reason someone might want a seaplane?

In addition to the increased complexity that leads to higher costs of maintenance and chances for failure in remote areas, amphibious floats add alot of weight to a light single engine aircraft.
Typically, weight savings for straight floats would be 200-300lbs, so in the "bush", many operators prefer lighter straight floats to eliminate the weight of a retractable landing gear if they don't need it. This weight savings increase their useful load, allowing them to instead load the plane with fuel, cargo, and passengers.


User currently offlinexero9 From Canada, joined Feb 2007, 153 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (4 years 4 months 1 week 2 hours ago) and read 4398 times:

That makes perfect sense. To be honest, I didn't think retractable landing gear would add that much extra weight or cost that much more, but I must be wrong, or else we wouldn't see planes without them.

User currently offlinekelpKID From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6372 posts, RR: 3
Reply 13, posted (4 years 4 months 1 week 2 hours ago) and read 4377 times:

BTW, a floatplane can be landed on land, without damage, for maintenance....you just have to do it on the "infield grass"   You can even take off again with the aid of a dolly...


Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
User currently offlineFighterPilot From Canada, joined Jun 2005, 1383 posts, RR: 22
Reply 14, posted (4 years 4 months 1 week 2 hours ago) and read 4371 times:

Seaplanes covers everything that lands on water.
A flying boat uses its fuselage to land on the water ie Grumman goose, Spruce Goose.
A float plane is a plane that has removable floats in the bottom and can usually be converted to wheels, skis etc. These include DHC-2 Beavers, DHC-6 Twin Otters. Both flying boats and floatplanes can have retractable gear so they can land on both land and water.

Floatplane:

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Cal Gosselin



Flying Boat:

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Peter Tonna



Both "seaplanes"

Cal   



*Insert Sound Of GE90 Spooling Up Here*
User currently offlinexero9 From Canada, joined Feb 2007, 153 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (4 years 4 months 1 week 1 hour ago) and read 4364 times:

Quoting FighterPilot (Reply 14):
Flying Boat:

That's funny, I was going to comment how it's like the plane from Ice Pilots, and then it turns out it is one of their planes.


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