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146 Airbrakes  
User currently offlineSkidmark From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2001, 39 posts, RR: 0
Posted (12 years 8 months 3 weeks 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 1115 times:

Anyone have any idea about how the hydraulics at the back of the 146-200 move the large petrol fins at the tail?

Does the top hydraulic move the left fin and the bottom one move the right fin?

Mark

8 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineMetwrench From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 750 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (12 years 8 months 3 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 1035 times:

I haven't worked on a 146 since 1986 and can't quite envision the configuration of the clamshell actuators except for the safety clamps we put around the exposed pistons when working back there. I have a set of training manuals in storage and can dig them out this weekend if you're interested. What I do fondly recall about the 146 is that it is the most "maintenance friendly" A/C I've ever worked on. Too bad the ALF 502 engines were such crap.

User currently offlineAerokid From Belgium, joined Jun 2000, 348 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (12 years 8 months 3 weeks 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 1015 times:

Actually, there is only one hydraulic cylinder.

I'll try to explain how it works (kinda difficult without a drawing).

Each speed brake is mounted to the aircraft by means of two vertical hinges above eachother (of course). The hydraulic cylinder is placed aft of those hinges and just pushes the speed brakes open (away from each other). To prevent asymetry when the speed brakes deploy, a compensator strut is used. At the hinge of the starboard speed brake, the framework of the brake extends a little forward (so when the brake moves outward, this extension moves inward). At this extension (through a pivoting joint) one end of the compensator strut is mounted. The other end of the strut is mounted to the port speed brake, aft of the hinge. The distances between the hinge and the strut mountings (once forward and once aft of the hinge) are exactly the same. So when the starboard speed brake moves outward, it pushes the port speed brake exactly as far outward. Therefore, no matter what the position of the hydraulic cylinder is, both speed brakes are always deployed at the same angle.

Hope it is a bit understandable the way I explained it...

Best regards,
GR.


User currently offlineSkidmark From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2001, 39 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (12 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 981 times:

That would be cool Metwrench, if you could scan/obtain some technical pictures for me  Smile

Is your book a technical training manual? Could do with one of those  Big grin

Regards

Mark


User currently offlineSkidmark From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2001, 39 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (12 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 977 times:

I found this piccy, for reference.


Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © Colin Abbott



User currently offlineMetwrench From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 750 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (12 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 969 times:

Skidmark;

I'll dig them out this weekend, they are the manuals used for a 80 hour two week training course put on by BAe.

We weren't lucky enough to get to go to the UK for training, they sent an Instructor over. After class we would gather around the A/C, S/N 13 for show and tell. Good class, good experience. The Brit Instructors and Tech Reps liked after hour excurrsions as much as we do!! That's where the real training happened.

The manuals are two volumes, 2" binders, a few schematics color coded as well. I don't have "scan" capabilities, but have friends that might help.

On Monday pick a subject and I'll work on a way to get it to you. I'll mail stuff if you like.

Met


User currently offlineMetwrench From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 750 posts, RR: 2
Reply 6, posted (12 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 922 times:

Mark;

I've got the books, what do you want me to do with them?

Met


User currently offlineSkidmark From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2001, 39 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (12 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 894 times:

Hey Metwrench

Well, really, I'm looking for tech information regarding every moving part of the 146-200 (ie How do the flaps move down and the back of the supports for the engine). I guess you could say, I'm looking for the sequencing of the moving parts (ie how they get to where there going and what parts are involved).

Any technical photos and/or write-ups of how certain things happen (ie the rear airbrake fins opening up), would of great help to me.

Please feel free to e-mail me!

All the best,

Mark


User currently offlineAerokid From Belgium, joined Jun 2000, 348 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (12 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 869 times:

Skidmark, I tried to send you an email but it seems like the address in your user profile is wrong, so I just post it here. This drawing comes from the 146 ramp manual.



Best regards,
GR.


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