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Pilot Headphone Question  
User currently offlinereadytotaxi From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2006, 3195 posts, RR: 2
Posted (4 years 1 week 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 4690 times:

If all parties, airline makers, civil aviation authorities and all gave it the OKAY, would you be happy wearing the "apple" type headphones in your ears with a little stick mic like the singers use?

Or is it a case of it isn't broke so don't fix it, thank you.


you don't get a second chance to make a first impression!
11 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinebri2k1 From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 988 posts, RR: 4
Reply 1, posted (4 years 1 week 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 4687 times:

A lot of them exist already. http://www.earinc.com/p2-headsets-aviation.php


Position and hold
User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6346 posts, RR: 3
Reply 2, posted (4 years 1 week 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 4617 times:

Quoting readytotaxi (Thread starter):
If all parties, airline makers, civil aviation authorities and all gave it the OKAY, would you be happy wearing the "apple" type headphones in your ears with a little stick mic like the singers use?

If Apple made them in 500-600 ohm impedance, I'm sure they could be used in such a role   However, Apple would also have to add a microphone to them...

To be a "legal" headset, though (one used by the flight crew, not passengers), you have to conform to an FAA TSO (not sure the number on that one), and most headsets also conform to a US MIL SPEC. I would love to know the requirements of that TSO  

As I recall, Sporty's sells an impedance matcher for 1/4" stereo headset headphones that allows them to be plugged into an aircraft intercom (it even handles the stereo to mono conversion-there are a few stereo intercoms around, mostly in GA planes. But the vast majority are mono). Obviously, you would need a 1/8" to 1/4" adapter to use it with iPod ear buds. But such an adapter on a non-aviation headset would only be legal for use by passengers.



Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
User currently offlineetherealsky From United States of America, joined Apr 2010, 328 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (4 years 1 week 6 days ago) and read 4580 times:

If by "Apple style" you mean earbuds, there are a few products on the market that are very similar in form factor. Obviously, most typical MP3 player earbuds possess miserable noise-cancelling properties, but Clarity Aloft (http://www.clarityaloft.com/features.htm) makes earbud headsets that claim up to 35-45 dB passive noise reduction. For those that don't mind the intrusive nature of earbuds (or the $525+ pricetag) they are one of the best since they create an excellent seal with your ear canal.

I have a friend who uses a Clarity Aloft headset and he really enjoys it.

[Edited 2010-07-19 14:47:49]


"And that's why you always leave a note..."
User currently offlinerichm From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2004, 798 posts, RR: 7
Reply 4, posted (4 years 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 4251 times:

The problem with anything that goes inside the ear or the ear canal itself, is the increased risk of an ear infection. Especially given the probability that they would be removed and reinserted frequently.

I was looking at some of the headsets, such as the "Plantronics MS30 StarSet Aviation Headset" and they look rather uncomfortable compared to a conventional headset with padded ear-cups. What's the main advantage of using those over a conventional headset like the one shown below?



Rich

[Edited 2010-07-30 00:56:23]

User currently offlinedw747400 From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 1257 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (4 years 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 4244 times:

Quoting KELPkid (Reply 2):
To be a "legal" headset, though (one used by the flight crew, not passengers), you have to conform to an FAA TSO (not sure the number on that one),

Actually, TSO is not required for most operations. Many 121 op specs allow operations with non TSO headsets.



CFI--Certfied Freakin Idiot
User currently offlinepilotpip From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 3149 posts, RR: 11
Reply 6, posted (4 years 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 4101 times:

Quoting richm (Reply 4):
The problem with anything that goes inside the ear or the ear canal itself, is the increased risk of an ear infection. Especially given the probability that they would be removed and reinserted frequently.

I was looking at some of the headsets, such as the "Plantronics MS30 StarSet Aviation Headset" and they look rather uncomfortable compared to a conventional headset with padded ear-cups. What's the main advantage of using those over a conventional headset like the one shown below?

I have NEVER heard of somebody getting an ear infection from putting an in-ear speaker in. If you're in a jet particularly there are a number of reasons for not wearing a full-ear headset like the Bose X in the picture:

Less noise
Comfort
Better passive noise reduction
Less bulk

I still wear my 10 year old David Clarks in the 170. I actually find the bose to be quite uncomfortable. After 4-5 hours ANY headset gets uncomfortable and on longer legs we'll often take them off in cruise. Most airliners don't have the intercom like a GA aircraft so the mic is either hot or off. The hiss of a hot mic gets pretty old (especially the bose, they're loud in the Embraers for some reason).

If I could afford it, I would readily buy a clarity aloft of lightspeed in-ear and get custom molded ear pieces. They fit in the palm of your hand, offer as much hearing protection and are comfortable for hours on end. Keep them clean and you'll have no problem. I know plenty of coworkers that can't say that about the over-ear headsets that come in the aircraft. I've actually had a rash develop after using one even though I wiped it with an sanitizing wipe.



DMI
User currently offlineSLUAviator From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 357 posts, RR: 3
Reply 7, posted (4 years 1 hour ago) and read 3979 times:

I just switched from my DC's to the Lightspeed Mach 1 with the custom ear gels. AMAZING. I'll never go back to another big clunky headset. It is fantastic in both the jets I fly at work, and when I can afford to rent a piston popper. It is the first headset I have owned that I can say is still comfortable after 8 hours.


What do I know? I just fly 'em.......
User currently offlineKingairTA From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 458 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (3 years 12 months 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 3854 times:

We use those Bose Xs on our C-12. They sound good and work good but the yokes for the ear pieces need to be of better material. I am constantly sending headsets back to Bose for warrenty work because the plastic cracks.

User currently offlineROSWELL41 From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 776 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (3 years 12 months 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 3745 times:

I use a Telex 750 in the CRJ. Cheap, reliable and TSO'd.

User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31667 posts, RR: 56
Reply 10, posted (3 years 12 months 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 3611 times:

Wouldn't the Cup types be more effective in locating desired sound to the ears only.
regds
MEL.



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6346 posts, RR: 3
Reply 11, posted (3 years 12 months 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 3566 times:

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 10):
Wouldn't the Cup types be more effective in locating desired sound to the ears only.
regds
MEL.

I asked this once in this forum, and TDSCanuck said that, while the cup type headsets will work with an airliner intercom (i.e. it is electronically compatible), it will also block some important sounds from the crew alerting systems in modern flight decks.

Not only that, but the cup type headsets can get mighty uncomfortable after a couple of hours of flying    They squeeze your ears like a vise grip. I have done many long cross countries in GA planes with cup type headsets...you do need them in GA planes, though, for hearing protection (unless you have an excellent active noise reduction headset). Most cup type headsets have in the neighborhood of 22-24 dB passive noise reduction.



Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
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