Sponsor Message:
Aviation Technical / Operations Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Baggage Handling And Tracking  
User currently offlineQuokka From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 4 hours ago) and read 2870 times:

The most common type of labelling used to identify and track baggage through from the point of origin to the final destination is the thermal printed, bar-coded adhesive backed tags, but some airlines have started using radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips embedded in the tags. QF recently trialed a system of luggage tags embedded with frequent flier details that automatically enabled the itinerary to be read and this system is now being rolled out across Australia. This would work for frequent fliers but obviously not those who fly rarely or not on the same airline.

How many airports/ airlines are equipped for this technology and is there any progress to a universally accepted standard through IATA for RFID tagging?

11 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineFlyASAGuy2005 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 7004 posts, RR: 11
Reply 1, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 4 hours ago) and read 2857 times:

I would say this is YEARS and YEARS before it is standard. If ever. Bag scanning, which has been around forever and a day is still not employed by many airlines. It's only seen systemwide use with major US carriers over the past 5-7 years i'd say. With a push for the technology around 2006


What gets measured gets done.
User currently offlineeoinnz From New Zealand, joined Jul 2003, 226 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (3 years 9 months 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 2455 times:

I would also say this is very far away

The QF system has had a few problems (which also a good thing at the same time to help identify them before introduced on a larger world scale)

Some include:
The bag tags are falling off or getting jammed in equipment and being ripped off. Therefore there is zero identification on the bag as to where it is supposed to go or who the owner is (as most people don't have a 2nd label with name/phone number/address).

The tags don't store any personal information of the frequent flyer, so anyone could use any RFID tag - even a non frequent flyer. The tag is loaded with the flight information and passenger name of the person checking in the bag - basically an electronic version of what is on the paper tag today. However when the bags are placed on the baggage drop, the tags are not getting the information stored onto the RFID chip, so bags reach the baggage sorting area with no passenger or flight details for the handlers and miss the scheduled flight.


User currently offlineQuokka From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (3 years 9 months 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 2438 times:

Quoting eoinnz (Reply 2):
The tags don't store any personal information of the frequent flyer


Thanks for your reply highlighting some of the problems. I must have misunderstood how QF's system was working. I thought that the itinerary was obtained from the frequent flyer ID and that was why it is limited to QF domestic only at present.

Obviously a wider application would have to cover passengers who are not a frequent flyer member.

I was aware that there had been some problems with tags coming off, but has the rate been greater than conventional labels being ripped off? If it is indeed greater, this would negate the intension of minimising bags going astray or disappearing altogether. As reducing costs of following up misplaced baggage was expected to partially offset the costs of introducing RFID, would there be any savings at all?


User currently offlineeoinnz From New Zealand, joined Jul 2003, 226 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (3 years 9 months 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 2431 times:

Quoting Quokka (Reply 3):
Thanks for your reply highlighting some of the problems. I must have misunderstood how QF's system was working. I thought that the itinerary was obtained from the frequent flyer ID and that was why it is limited to QF domestic only at present.

Not quite misunderstood. Check in works this way. A frequent flyer taps their card at a Q card reader and it checks them in for the next flight on their profile. If they have no bags, they go to the gate, and tap again to be registered as boarded and that's it. This is only for frequent flyers. Other customers must check in using a kiosk or at a counter.

If they have a bag though, they then go to the bag drop, tap again, and place the bag on the belt. At this point only the name and flight details are stored as well as baggage priority. While the bag tag does have a FF number barcode to help identify it if the tag is not stored with the flight information, it is no good if the tag completely disappears.

Staff have or will receive a Qbag tag as a Qantas 90th anniversary gift. But there is nothing to stop me from giving it you to use as a non frequent flyer or even as a frequent flyer. The tag has no owner.

Qantas plans to sell them at the airport in kiosks for bronze and non QF frequent flyers.


User currently offlineCitationJet From United States of America, joined Mar 2003, 2432 posts, RR: 3
Reply 5, posted (3 years 9 months 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 2429 times:

I am always amazed when I send a single piece of paper to a foreign country using FedEx. I can track the itinerary and status of the item over the internet. I then get an e-mail confirmation with the time, location, and name of the person who received the package. FedEx does that for every item carried on their aircraft. And for a US$25 shipment cost.

On the airlines, I purchase an international business class ticket for thousands of dollars. I check a large 50 pound suitcase. The airline proceeds to loose my luggage. They don't know where in the world it is. I have had luggage delivered to me four weeks after a flight from Lisbon to Chicago. During the four week period, the airlines didn't know where in the world my suitcase was. I had already filed a claim, when the bag suddently showed up at the destination airport. It had evidently sat in London for most of the time, even though London was not even on my original itinerary. In this instance the only tracking was the original paper destination tag (1930's technology), which was still intact and showing the original luggage routing, when the luggage arrived 4 weeks later.

[Edited 2010-11-24 05:03:33]


Boeing Flown: 701,702,703;717;720;721,722;731,732,733,734,735,737,738,739;741,742,743,744,747SP;752,753;762,763;772,773.
User currently offlineQuokka From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (3 years 9 months 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 2407 times:

Quoting eoinnz (Reply 4):
Not quite misunderstood.


Thanks for the clarification. I appreciate it.

Quoting CitationJet (Reply 5):
The airline proceeds to loose my luggage.


Tell me about it. I had a bag go missing on a flight form LHR to HAM. Somehow it ended up it BRU and the airline phoned me up to say they had brought it HAM just before I was due to return to LHR. It too had the original labels attached.

Hopefully RFID would reduce the instances of misreads, if the problem of becoming detached can be solved.


User currently offlineFly2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (3 years 9 months 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 2371 times:

Perhaps a different but more radical solution is to embed RFID chips in bags themselves. Each bag would have it's unique code (like a car's VIN), and you have no danger of it being teared off or lost, short of having the bag itself destroyed. RFID scanner which are already widely available (as those used for pets) to scan and or program the chips could be used. New bags could just have them built in, embedded perhaps in the bag's logo to make it more easily identifiable. Older bags could have them sewn in a patch or put as a sticker. It would of course require the creation of a worldwide standard and what not.

User currently offlinemusapapaya From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2004, 1086 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (3 years 9 months 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 2319 times:

Quoting Quokka (Reply 6):
Tell me about it. I had a bag go missing on a flight form LHR to HAM. Somehow it ended up it BRU and the airline phoned me up to say they had brought it HAM just before I was due to return to LHR. It too had the original labels attached.

hehe, which airline was that you flew with?

regards
musapapaya



Lufthansa Group of Airlines
User currently offlineQuokka From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (3 years 9 months 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 2287 times:

Quoting musapapaya (Reply 8):
which airline was that you flew with?

A well known British one who used to say "Fly the Flag" - BA


User currently offlineexFWAOONW From United States of America, joined Nov 2009, 403 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (3 years 9 months 19 hours ago) and read 2230 times:

Are you sure the RFID tag is imprinted with the FF's info? It would be much simpler and cheaper to use pre-programmed RFID chips. At check-in, the RFID tag would be scanned and its "code" entered into the PNR and baggage sorting computer. Creating a unique RFID tag at check-in requires a much more expensive and complicated piece of hardware that would not like being used curbside, like in Chicago in the winter.


Is just me, or is flying not as much fun anymore?
User currently offlineeoinnz From New Zealand, joined Jul 2003, 226 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (3 years 9 months 19 hours ago) and read 2222 times:

Quoting exFWAOONW (Reply 10):
Are you sure the RFID tag is imprinted with the FF's info?

The RFID tag is only imprinted with the flight information of the person checking it in. - that is flight number, date, and passenger name and PNR - the details that could be found on any paper tag today. That could be you, me or Joe Bloggs next door - anyone could use the tag - even one issued to a FF could be used by anyone.

As a form of ID the tags issued to FF do have a barcode to help identify it but as I mentioned isn't much help if the tag is missing. Essentially the tags though are colour coded to make FF feel important but otherwise with the exception of a FF number printed on it, they are the same whether red, silver, gold, platinum or black. It is electronically storing a paper version.


Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic Baggage Handling And Tracking
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Tech/Ops related posts only!
  • Not Tech/Ops related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
Questions Regarding Check-In & Baggage Handling posted Sat Apr 11 2009 14:03:00 by JA
Baggage Handling Systems posted Thu Mar 27 2008 10:36:31 by Ptoserve
Baggage Handling On Ground: How Does It Work? posted Tue Jun 26 2007 22:39:32 by Evan767
Baggage Handling At Heathrow posted Tue Mar 9 2004 14:48:55 by Djdiffusion
707 And Dc8 Handling Problems posted Thu Oct 2 2008 18:34:46 by B767
Rain And Handling Characteristics posted Thu May 4 2006 09:43:06 by Speedracer1407
MD88 Pax And Baggage Question posted Tue Feb 18 2003 22:12:55 by PHLflyer
Need Info On Acquiring JT8D-9A's And -15's posted Sat Nov 13 2010 07:26:30 by United727
Interline Baggage With United posted Tue Nov 9 2010 06:23:24 by ripcordd
Part 121/135 And Regional Airlines posted Mon Nov 8 2010 16:28:30 by UltimateDelta

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format