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Stealer Over Aircraft Doors  
User currently offlineweb500sjc From United States of America, joined Sep 2009, 692 posts, RR: 0
Posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 2362 times:

When Iook at a jet aircraft door there is always a small metal stark above it, that on doors in the front goes from down to up- and then as you move bak on the airplane the strake transitions to a up to down strake. What are these for?


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3 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6265 posts, RR: 3
Reply 1, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 2353 times:

You talking about the drip strip? (Same function as the one on a car...prevent rain from pouring down the fuselage and into the open door below)/


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User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 18704 posts, RR: 58
Reply 2, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 2353 times:

I think they're gutters meant to keep water from dripping into the doorway when it's raining. The slanted mounting represents 1) a need that one end be lower than the other for drainage and 2) the local airflow, which is not always parallel to the direction of flight.

User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 18704 posts, RR: 58
Reply 3, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 2349 times:

Quoting KELPkid (Reply 1):
You talking about the drip strip? (Same function as the one on a car...prevent rain from pouring down the fuselage and into the open door below)/

I was once on a DC-10 where the drip strip on the #2R door was apparently absent. I guess they forgot and so they opened it up to cater the aircraft on a rainy stopover and water came just deluging in. I remember they couldn't get the door closed fast enough. They had to cater the plane from another door. I was about 12 or 13 at the time and I remember thinking it was pretty funny. There was no serious damage, but a tiny little cleaner lady came running aboard in a fit of tiny little cleaner lady-ness and mopped up the mess. Which was good, because those were our seats.


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