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Rotating Beacons - Different Configs?  
User currently offlineFlyASAGuy2005 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 7004 posts, RR: 11
Posted (3 years 9 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 3795 times:

Hello TechOps experts. One thing i've always noticed and wanted to ask was, is there a specific reason why different a/c's rotating beacons emit differently? For example, on the CRJs, the blink independently (top/bottom/top...) and on say the 757 the both blink at the same time. On the 717, it's both (top/bottom/top then both at the same time).

Is there a rhyme or reason behind this? My initial thoughts is no and it's just they way they are wired but really want to know the reasoning behind it.


What gets measured gets done.
9 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineShamrock137 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 142 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (3 years 9 months 3 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 3709 times:

Their is no standardized pattern or regulation relating to the flash patterns, it simply depends on what type of flasher module is used. Boeings seem to synchronize the beacons so that the top and bottom flash at the same time. Airbus does the same thing, yet it is further synchronized with the flash sequence of the wingtip strobes. Hope that helps!


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User currently offlineCitationJet From United States of America, joined Mar 2003, 2438 posts, RR: 3
Reply 2, posted (3 years 9 months 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 3652 times:

Sometimes the beacons are not always in the same location for a given type of aircraft. The early Citation X's (Model 750s) had the beacon on top of the bullet on the vertical tail. Later serial numbers of the same type had the beacon on the bottom side of the bullet.


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User currently offline26point2 From United States of America, joined Mar 2010, 825 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (3 years 9 months 2 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 3517 times:

The Global Express now sports a 3 position beacon switch. Off-Red-White. We use red. Someone said white is required in some countries. Not sure if that's true though.

User currently offlineKingairTA From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 458 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (3 years 9 months 2 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 3483 times:

A quick way to tell if a C-130 was built with air to air refuelling in mind and it doesn't have the pods is if the strobe is on the tail or the fuselage. KC's have the strobe on the tip of the vertical stab non KC's have the strobe on the fuselage.

Also on the C-130s with strobes(non rotating) they have seperate power supplies.

I think and maybe wrong but I believe when it comes to the beacons it's upto the manufacturer to do as they please as they meet the minimum requirements.

As SOP in my C-130 days we ran the white strobes as much as possible. The only time we'd switch to red was if we were in the goo and the flash was irritating.


User currently offlinestratosphere From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 1653 posts, RR: 4
Reply 5, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 3240 times:

Quoting 26point2 (Reply 3):
The Global Express now sports a 3 position beacon switch. Off-Red-White. We use red. Someone said white is required in some countries. Not sure if that's true though.

For the short time I worked at the regionals the SAAB 340 has a 3 postiton switch as well. They use the red for taxi and switch to white for takeoff and in flight.



NWA THE TRUE EVIL EMPIRE
User currently offlineAccess-Air From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 1939 posts, RR: 12
Reply 6, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 3113 times:

Quoting stratosphere (Reply 5):
For the short time I worked at the regionals the SAAB 340 has a 3 postiton switch as well. They use the red for taxi and switch to white for takeoff and in flight.

The BAE ATP does this too....

Actually on newer planes, these anti-collision lights dont rotate, they are strobes...
On older planes like the DC8s, DC9s, 707s early 727s and 737s, etc...all used rotating or agitating beacons. Boeing perferred rotating and Douglas the agitating back and fourth movement.
Actually a lot of older aircraft had the these beacons until the strobe types came along. I guess the simplicty of a strobe versus an actual motorized moving light fixture was an ease maintenance wise...
I prefer the only school stuff....I hate the red strobes with a passion.....
United used to on their older DC8s, 737-200s and 727-100s and early 200s, not only the rotating beacons but also the red and green nav lights would agitate back and fourth too!!! The little tail cone up on the 727s T-tail did this with the white light as well!!! I loved seeing that!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
The rotating or agitating beacons, to me, seem to get my attention more than the strobe lights....

Access-Air



Remember, Wherever you go, there you are!!!!
User currently onlinebohica From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2701 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 3057 times:

Quoting CitationJet (Reply 2):
The early Citation X's (Model 750s) had the beacon on top of the bullet on the vertical tail. Later serial numbers of the same type had the beacon on the bottom side of the bullet.

I'm curious to know why the rotating beacon (strobe) would be on the bottom of the bullet? That would block the view of the beacon if you were looking at the plane head-on.

Quoting Access-Air (Reply 6):
United used to on their older DC8s, 737-200s and 727-100s and early 200s, not only the rotating beacons but also the red and green nav lights would agitate back and fourth too!!! The little tail cone up on the 727s T-tail did this with the white light as well!!! I loved seeing that!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Those were the good ole days.   The only problem with that was there were too many moving parts. A retired UA mechanic told me that they were being fixed all the time.


The L-1011 had four rotating beacons. Two on the top and two on the bottom. If one of them was burned out on the top or bottom, it could be MEL'd. Some of the later L-1011's had strobes though.


User currently offlinec5load From United States of America, joined Sep 2008, 917 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 3054 times:

Strobes on military aircraft differ as well. On the C-5 we don't have wingtip strobes, so we have white flashing lights on the top and bottom of the fuselage, and on the tail. They can be changed to red as well. The KC-10 is cool the way they have theirs. From what I have seen, after they takeoff their fusealge strobes have a pattern of red-white-red, in addition to normal double flashing wing strobes.

Quoting Access-Air (Reply 6):
United used to on their older DC8s, 737-200s and 727-100s and early 200s, not only the rotating beacons but also the red and green nav lights would agitate back and fourth too!!! The little tail cone up on the 727s T-tail did this with the white light as well!!! I loved seeing that!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
The rotating or agitating beacons, to me, seem to get my attention more than the strobe lights....

     



"But this airplane has 4 engines, it's an entirely different kind of flying! Altogether"
User currently offlineDashTrash From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 1529 posts, RR: 2
Reply 9, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 3046 times:

Quoting bohica (Reply 7):
I'm curious to know why the rotating beacon (strobe) would be on the bottom of the bullet? That would block the view of the beacon if you were looking at the plane head-on.

There is some sort of security device option available on later serial #s that uses the top of the vertical stab. The red light is blocked from the front, but most threats would be coming from the side. Also, if you're a couple of degrees off center in either direction you'll still see it blinking.


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