Sponsor Message:
Aviation Technical / Operations Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Why Not The Same A/C Both Ways Across The Atlantic  
User currently offlineKurtjeter From United States of America, joined Feb 2011, 79 posts, RR: 0
Posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 3685 times:

A lot of us think that the aircraft we fly on from point A to point B is the same one we fly on as we fly back from B to A. I know it's not, but I find this particularly interesting in longer, transocean flights. For example, I flew a 777 from ORD to BRU and then returned (same airline) on an A330. Likewise, EWR to FRA, courtesy of a 777, but return to EWR (same airlines) on a 767.

My question: what happened to that 777 that took me from EWR to FRA? It obviously had to return to EWR by some route, at some time. And, likewise, how did that 767 get over to FRA in the first place to get me back to EWR?

Would appreciate any information.

12 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinecomorin From United States of America, joined May 2005, 4895 posts, RR: 16
Reply 1, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 3587 times:

Rest assured that the 777 does indeed return. One of two reasons for your dilemma - the airline has multiple flights per day: so you could go to ORD to BRU on one aircraft, and return on another while the original aircraft is scheduled for another flight. The other is that the airline can vary equipment depending on day of week, so you could come in on one and return on the other.

User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 24643 posts, RR: 22
Reply 2, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 3580 times:

Airlines with more than one daily flight on a route try to match the demand with the capacity. Flights at different times of the day can have widely differing demand, so you want to use the largest aircraft on the most popular flight.

User currently offlinevgnatl747 From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 1513 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 3514 times:

Routings are rarely back and forth (when flying to/from/between hub and/or focus cities). In a small regional airport, 99% of the time, the aircraft that flew from the hub to that city turns around and goes back to the hub, but once it gets to the hub it goes somewhere else (doesn't sit around and wait to go back to that small regional airport again).

Every airline and route is different. As an example, the 772 that flies IAH-LHR as CO34 returns as CO29 LHR-EWR. Now there's also a 772 that comes into LHR from EWR, along with a couple 752s. CO has that nifty "where's my airplane coming from" feature on their website that makes it a lot easier to figure some of that out (if your EWR example happened to be on CO metal).

Long story short, there's lots of reasons for having the routings the way they are. Specific aircraft are rarely route specific, and in the scenario where there's multiple daily flights on a given route they're not necessarily all of the same type. Depending on how the slots and the turnarounds are scheduled, an aircraft coming in from one city may be turned to go somewhere else. You need this to minimize wasted time on the ground, keep fleet utilization as efficient as possible, and allow for rotating of aircraft to facilitate maintenance. If you had one specific frame dedicated to fly back and forth between EWR and FRA, taking that frame out for maintenance (preventative or otherwise) get's much more difficult. You also run the risk of it sitting in FRA for an extended (wasteful) period of time until the next departure back to EWR. In addition, in the scenario of the ugly winter we've had this year, you run the risk of your metal being stuck somewhere else in the event of a major weather event (potentially crippling the fleet depending on how utilized everything is).

There's a real science that goes into fleet and route planning, and I can't even begin to explain it all. I think that's a high enough summary that answers your question though.



Work Hard. Fly Right. Continental Airlines
User currently offlineAesma From France, joined Nov 2009, 6471 posts, RR: 9
Reply 4, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 3469 times:

A good start could be to use the airlines' websites and try to book the same leg at different times/dates to see the variation in aircraft (in the same direction). Then obviously the same applies in the other direction. When I book a certain flight I take often, I like to vary planes so I chose the flight according to the plane I want to fly, last time it was CRJ-200 one way, A318 the other way. Next time I'll try to get on a CRJ-1000.


New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
User currently offlinekellmark From United States of America, joined Dec 2000, 688 posts, RR: 8
Reply 5, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 3267 times:

One of the things that I did in my airline career was to route aircraft. The aircraft fleet types are scheduled according to passenger demand, crew capability and availability and aircraft performance capability and limitations. But the actual individual tail numbers within a fleet are generally scheduled according to maintenance requirements. These requirements are built in to the schedule as well. Each item has to be done within a certain specified required limit, measured in one of three ways, flight hours, calendar days, or cycles (takeoffs and landings). For example, an aircraft may need an overnight service, an A check, or engine inspections, or a flap lubrication, etc. These items are assigned to particular stations which have the capability to do the assigned items. It is also necessary to plan technician workload and parts availability or any special tools or facilities.

Normally, as noted above, if a station is at the end of a spoke of a hub, it just goes back. But if not, then any number of combinations may be possible. Also, irregular operations like weather diversions, crews timing out, security issues, airport closures or mechanical breakdowns can cause necessary changes. Aircraft routing is very much like a three dimensional chess game.


User currently offlineAmwest2united From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 408 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 3156 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting Kurtjeter (Thread starter):
For example, I flew a 777 from ORD to BRU and then returned (same airline) on an A330

What airline did you fly ORD-BRU-ORD, obviously not a US based carrier?



Life is what happens to you while you making plans to live it!
User currently offlineetops1 From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 1063 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 3050 times:

I can only think of Jet Airways who has a hub in BRU and fly both the A330 and 777.

User currently offlineKurtjeter From United States of America, joined Feb 2011, 79 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 2954 times:

Quoting Amwest2united (Reply 6):
What airline did you fly ORD-BRU-ORD, obviously not a US based carrier?

It was AA, in fact. This was in the summer of 2009.


User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19278 posts, RR: 58
Reply 9, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 2817 times:

Quoting Kurtjeter (Reply 8):

It was AA, in fact.

Not on an A330 it wasn't...


User currently offlineCitationJet From United States of America, joined Mar 2003, 2414 posts, RR: 3
Reply 10, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 2642 times:

Quoting Kurtjeter (Thread starter):
I flew a 777 from ORD to BRU and then returned (same airline) on an A330.
Quoting Kurtjeter (Reply 8):
It was AA, in fact.

How is that possible, since AA doesn't fly the A330?



Boeing Flown: 701,702,703;717;720;721,722;731,732,733,734,735,737,738,739;741,742,743,744,747SP;752,753;762,763;772,773.
User currently offlineKurtjeter From United States of America, joined Feb 2011, 79 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 2516 times:

Quoting CitationJet (Reply 10):
How is that possible, since AA doesn't fly the A330?

My mistake, I should have listed it as a 767.
Thanks for the info! Helpful and interesting.


User currently offlineANITIX87 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 3299 posts, RR: 13
Reply 12, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 2385 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Another example is LX's JFK flights.

There are three daily flights to JFK. Two from ZRH, and one from GVA. Let's call the airplanes A, B, and C (all are A330-300). Airport "XXX" is another A330-300 destination in the network (any destination).

A: ZRH-JFK-GVA-JFK-ZRH
B: GVA-JFK-ZRH-XXX-ZRH
C: ZRH-JFK-ZRH-XXX-ZRH

TIS



www.stellaryear.com: Canon EOS 50D, Canon EOS 5DMkII, Sigma 50mm 1.4, Canon 24-70 2.8L II, Canon 100mm 2.8L, Canon 100-4
Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic Why Not The Same A/C Both Ways Across The Atlantic
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Tech/Ops related posts only!
  • Not Tech/Ops related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
Why Two Different Flight #s For The Same Flight? posted Wed Dec 29 2010 16:29:24 by krisyyz
Why Are There Multiple Codes For The Same Airport? posted Tue Apr 20 2010 10:11:50 by RobertS975
Boeing Greys?why One, Not The Other? posted Thu Oct 23 2008 11:09:20 by Soon7x7
Aviation Headsets: Why Not In The Ear? posted Tue Jan 23 2007 18:29:13 by Analog
Why Not Engines On Top Of The Wings? posted Wed Jun 1 2005 00:21:25 by Keta
Paint In The Wings...why Not? posted Mon Feb 14 2005 17:36:41 by Bongo
Why Not Heat The Horizontal Stab? posted Wed Jul 25 2001 02:57:17 by Cdfmxtech
Flaps Not In Clean Config. On The Ground On RJ posted Thu Oct 16 2008 21:23:47 by FlyASAGuy2005
Why Doesn't Airbus Put Winglets On The A306? posted Sat May 24 2008 18:50:29 by FalconBird
Why No DC-8-70 Series In The Early 1970s? posted Wed Feb 6 2008 09:32:50 by Happy-flier

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format