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Aircraft Type Rating And Different Airlines  
User currently offlinegoinv From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 264 posts, RR: 2
Posted (3 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 4705 times:

If you have an aircraft type rating - lets say a B737-300. Can you fly that aircraft irrespective of the airline.

The reason for asking is :-

I have booked my wife on a fear of flying course at Manchester in April. They charter an aircraft (B737 or A319/320) during the course and take everyone on a 45 minute flight.

I would assume that the aeroplane to be used will be based at Manchester and that they wouldn't go to the expense of ferrying a plane from another airport. During the flight the pilot makes a running commentary on what is happening.

I am guessing the the plane will be from an airline that has space capacity that day - Jet2, BMIBaby etc.

Surely a pilot for Jet2 wouldn't have the necessary "insight" to provide a commentary which is stipulated by the course ?

The course is being run by Virgin Atlantic. As VS don't operate B737 / A319 / A320 aircraft I would guess that they have a resident pilot on hand who does the flying. Could this pilot fly a Jet2 737 at Manchester, a Thomson 737 at Gatwick, a BMIBaby 737 at East Midlands etc?


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8 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinenws2002 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 925 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (3 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 4697 times:

UK rules are probably somewhat different from the US, but similar in nature. In the US airline pilots must go through indoc for each airline. Type rating is a separate process.

User currently offlineShyFlyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (3 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 4653 times:

Quoting goinv (Thread starter):
If you have an aircraft type rating - lets say a B737-300. Can you fly that aircraft irrespective of the airline.

Yes, and no. Yes in respect to the fact that an aircraft type rating isn't restricted to a certain airline. No, as nws2002 mentions, you must go through an airline's indoc before flying the aircraft in revenue service.

Quoting nws2002 (Reply 1):
The course is being run by Virgin Atlantic. As VS don't operate B737 / A319 / A320 aircraft I would guess that they have a resident pilot on hand who does the flying.

Very likely no. Since Virgin does not operate the type, they do not provide the necessary training to their pilots. While it is possible that Virgin employs pilots who have 737 or A320 type ratings, they aren't current on that aircraft.

My educated guess is that Virgin will charter the appropriate aircraft from another carrier and that company will provide the crew.


User currently offlineDashTrash From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 1563 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (3 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 4625 times:

You not only have to go through indoc, but aircraft training for specific airlines. If I were to get a job flying Dash 8's for Commutair, I'd be sitting in the exact same classes / training as the other new guys who've never set foot in the airplane.

User currently onlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17176 posts, RR: 66
Reply 4, posted (3 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 4614 times:

Quoting goinv (Thread starter):

Surely a pilot for Jet2 wouldn't have the necessary "insight" to provide a commentary which is stipulated by the course ?

Why not? He/she has the training required the fly the aircraft. Presumably he/she has gone through with the course organizers what the commentary should contain.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21865 posts, RR: 55
Reply 5, posted (3 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 4611 times:

Quoting goinv (Thread starter):
Surely a pilot for Jet2 wouldn't have the necessary "insight" to provide a commentary which is stipulated by the course ?

Why not? Flying is flying, and in general the procedures for flying one airliner are the same as flying another. Okay, so you might press buttons on the Digital Flight Control Panel instead of the Mode Control Panel, or talk about Flaps 1, 2, 3 and Full instead of Flaps 1,5,15,25 and 30, but stuff at that level of detail (which is really what type rating courses are about, along with handling characteristics of the particular airplane) isn't going to be relevant to the public.

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently offlineCosmicCruiser From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 2255 posts, RR: 15
Reply 6, posted (3 years 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 4479 times:

It might even be a separate company from Virgin. Also from co. to co. checklist are different and procedures are different for same type jets.

User currently offlinegoinv From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 264 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (3 years 8 months 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 3759 times:

My wife went on the Fear Of Flying Course yesterday. The course was run by Virgin Atlantic. O-Board were VS pilots and VS cabin crew. However, they were only there in the capacity as passengers.

A Monarch A321 was chartered by Virgin and this was flown by Monarch pilots with the full complement of Monarch flight attendants looking after safety.

They flew from Manchester, over Blackpool - then turned around over the Isle of Man then returned to Manchester via the North Wales coast and Liverpool. Total flight time was just under an hour.

The departure screens at Manchester showed flight MONXXXX to Manchester !

How would ATC cope with such a flight. When the pilots got over the Isle of Man would they request permission to turn around to Manchester ?



Be who you are, The world was made to measure for your smile. So Smile.
User currently offlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21865 posts, RR: 55
Reply 8, posted (3 years 8 months 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 3746 times:

Quoting goinv (Reply 7):
How would ATC cope with such a flight. When the pilots got over the Isle of Man would they request permission to turn around to Manchester ?

There would be a flight plan that would reflect the entire route. With prior coordination with ATC, pretty much anything is possible.

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
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