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Any Pilots In The US Without Degrees?  
User currently offlineUnited Airline From Hong Kong, joined Jan 2001, 9106 posts, RR: 15
Posted (3 years 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 9521 times:

In Europe/Asia/Australasia there are plenty of pilots without degrees. Cathay Pacific, Singapore Airlines, Qantas etc…..

What about the US? Any pilots without degrees? Pretty rare?

51 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinebobnwa From United States of America, joined Dec 2000, 6344 posts, RR: 9
Reply 1, posted (3 years 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 9285 times:

Quoting United Airline (Thread starter):
What about the US? Any pilots without degrees? Pretty rare?


If you mean a degree from an accredited four year university, then plenty of pilots in the world including the US do not have degrees.


User currently offlineCessna172RG From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 747 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (3 years 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 9231 times:

I've got a license...and no degree. I went to college and all, just didn't finish for various reasons. Oh, but I don't fly for an airline, though. But I do have a license.


Save the whales...for dinner!!!
User currently offlineN6238P From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 484 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (3 years 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 9166 times:

From my experience looking at minimums posted, most regional's do not require a degree but most mainline carriers do.


To actively root against anybody is just low, and I hope karma comes back at you with a vengeance
User currently onlinetb727 From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 1546 posts, RR: 8
Reply 4, posted (3 years 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 9113 times:

The only reason I got a 4 year degree is because I knew, somewhere down the line, some major would want to see that line on my resume. That's it. I've said it for years, it's a big scam that you "have" to go to college to get a "good" job as a pilot. I don't care what school you want to, can you fly the plane safely.


Too lazy to work, too scared to steal!
User currently onlinemayor From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 9952 posts, RR: 14
Reply 5, posted (3 years 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 8962 times:

My son-in-law now flies for Omni and has no degree. Before that he had flown for Skywest, Jetblue and Lynx.


"A committee is a group of the unprepared, appointed by the unwilling, to do the unnecessary"----Fred Allen
User currently offlineburnsie28 From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 7502 posts, RR: 8
Reply 6, posted (3 years 6 days ago) and read 8822 times:

Most major carriers now are requiring a 4 year degree.


"Some People Just Know How To Fly"- Best slogan ever, RIP NW 1926-2009
User currently offlineairtran737 From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 3689 posts, RR: 12
Reply 7, posted (3 years 6 days ago) and read 8691 times:
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Quoting mayor (Reply 5):



My son-in-law now flies for Omni and has no degree. Before that he had flown for Skywest, Jetblue and Lynx.

Why isn't he at jetBlue anymore? You don't leave a place like that to go to an airline like Omni.



Nice Trip Report!!! Great Pics, thanks for posting!!!! B747Forever
User currently offlinePGNCS From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 2752 posts, RR: 45
Reply 8, posted (3 years 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 8675 times:

Quoting burnsie28 (Reply 6):
Most major carriers now are requiring a 4 year degree.

Burnsie is right, and even if they don't require it you need one to be competitive. In years past more people got hired without them, but it's rare at a US major carrier today. Interestingly, some regional airlines with flowthrough agreements with a major partner don't require them, so a few non-degreed pilots are coming to majors that way.


User currently onlinemayor From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 9952 posts, RR: 14
Reply 9, posted (3 years 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 8664 times:

Quoting airtran737 (Reply 7):
Why isn't he at jetBlue anymore? You don't leave a place like that to go to an airline like Omni.

He didn't feel like he got treated as promised at JetBlue. They promised that there would be a pilots domicile at SLC and then backed out.....he got stuck at JFK. Anyway, after JetBlue, he went to Lynx, didn't like that and then went corporate for a few years. Now he'll be flying DC-10s for Omni, with a good chance for left seat, soon and then on to the 777s when they get them.



"A committee is a group of the unprepared, appointed by the unwilling, to do the unnecessary"----Fred Allen
User currently onlinemffoda From United States of America, joined Apr 2010, 1016 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (3 years 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 8536 times:

Quoting mayor (Reply 9):
Now he'll be flying DC-10s for Omni, with a good chance for left seat, soon and then on to the 777s when they get them.

Has Omni ordered the 777 yet?

Regards



harder than woodpecker lips...
User currently offlineDashTrash From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 1438 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (3 years 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 7662 times:

Plenty of pilots at the regionals without degrees. A few at the majors without degrees who were hired in the past or through means other than off the street. Don't know about other fracs, but NetJets requires a 4 year degree.

User currently offlinekiffy From United States of America, joined Mar 2010, 176 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (3 years 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 7516 times:

Quoting mffoda (Reply 10):
Has Omni ordered the 777 yet?

Boeing 777-200ER deliveries scheduled for this or next month. (April/May 2011)


User currently offlinemaxpower1954 From United States of America, joined Sep 2008, 1034 posts, RR: 7
Reply 13, posted (3 years 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 7416 times:

In the tight pilot market of the 1970s, not only was a four year degree required but you needed a Masters to be competitive.
90% of the new hires in 1977 at the majors had a Masters degree. It was a way of winowing down the many thousands of applicants for relatively few jobs.


User currently offlinekiffy From United States of America, joined Mar 2010, 176 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (3 years 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 7237 times:

I’m in college right now, my second semester. When I graduate I would like to become a pilot. I am majoring in marine biology/geology although I’m not sure I should stick with this major since I cannot really see the connection to aviation. Should I be majoring in something more aviation related or does that matter?

User currently offlineMax Q From United States of America, joined May 2001, 4059 posts, RR: 19
Reply 15, posted (3 years 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 7167 times:

I do not have a degree.


It's probably a good idea to get one however I managed to get to the left seat of the 75 / 67 with a major Airline without it !



The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.
User currently offlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21083 posts, RR: 56
Reply 16, posted (3 years 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 7027 times:

Quoting kiffy (Reply 14):
I’m in college right now, my second semester. When I graduate I would like to become a pilot. I am majoring in marine biology/geology although I’m not sure I should stick with this major since I cannot really see the connection to aviation. Should I be majoring in something more aviation related or does that matter?

If you like marine biology/geology, stick with it. That way, you'll have a good degree should you find yourself on furlough from the airlines, and you might just find yourself a cool flying opportunity that doesn't involve the airlines at all (like flying marine research teams around in a seaplane - showing up with a marine biology degree would set you apart from everyone else right away, and not in the bad way).

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently offlineq120 From Canada, joined Aug 2008, 271 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (3 years 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 6994 times:

A pilots degree is more about the flight hours... this is still a profession where you do not require post secondary education. If you have the hours, you will have the job.


However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results
User currently offlineUnited Airline From Hong Kong, joined Jan 2001, 9106 posts, RR: 15
Reply 18, posted (3 years 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 6829 times:

Quoting bobnwa (Reply 1):
If you mean a degree from an accredited four year university, then plenty of pilots in the world including the US do not have degrees.

Yes

Quoting Cessna172RG (Reply 2):
I've got a license...and no degree. I went to college and all, just didn't finish for various reasons. Oh, but I don't fly for an airline, though. But I do have a license.

I see. So is it possible to join a US airline as a pilot without a degree? I suppose so if one has the experience and the relevant licenses.

Most Americans are University graduates I know especially the under 30 age group.


User currently offlinefuelfool From United States of America, joined Feb 2011, 138 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (3 years 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 6717 times:

Quoting United Airline (Reply 18):
Most Americans are University graduates I know especially the under 30 age group.

Most pilots in that age group, more than likely. In general, its not much more that 50/50, maybe less.



I love the smell of jet fuel in the morning...Smells like victory!
User currently offlinenavion1217 From United States of America, joined Jul 2010, 19 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (3 years 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 6109 times:

Quoting maxpower1954 (Reply 13):
In the tight pilot market of the 1970s, not only was a four year degree required but you needed a Masters to be competitive.
90% of the new hires in 1977 at the majors had a Masters degree. It was a way of winowing down the many thousands of applicants for relatively few jobs.

Quite different than 1966 when my dad was hired by Pan Am. He was a few courses short of his degree (which would have been history, not much to do with aviation) but he had 400 hours and a commercial ticket with a brand new instrument rating. (I guess the end of a war changes the supply and demand curves for a lot of things).

I know this is going off topic, but Dad didn't even have a multi-engine rating when he was hired. When he was upgraded from navigator/relief copilot to first officer he got his 707 type rating. When the examiner took his old license to write his temporary, he gave him his 707 rating, ATP, and multi-engine rating at the same time. I bet Dad had a beer or two that night!


User currently offline413X3 From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 1983 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (3 years 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 5828 times:

Quoting United Airline (Reply 18):
Most Americans are University graduates I know especially the under 30 age group.

Back in reality, Americans with degrees is around 30% of the population.


User currently offlineBCEaglesCO757 From United States of America, joined Mar 2011, 241 posts, RR: 2
Reply 22, posted (3 years 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 5818 times:

Quoting Max Q (Reply 15):
I do not have a degree.


It's probably a good idea to get one however I managed to get to the left seat of the 75 / 67 with a major Airline without it !

==============

Are you ex-military ? I'm guessing -and this is only my guess or opinion- and that is that those with a service background ,especially combat would be those flying without a degree.

Either way, in line with what someone said earlier. I just want a guy/girl who is competent and knows how to fly the plane.


User currently offlineUnited Airline From Hong Kong, joined Jan 2001, 9106 posts, RR: 15
Reply 23, posted (3 years 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 5798 times:

So there are still lots of youngsters without degrees flying for US airlines! Cool

I believe university education has little to do with flying. I believe one can be a good pilot with the relevant licenses/flying hours

Quoting 413X3 (Reply 21):
Back in reality, Americans with degrees is around 30% of the population.

REALLY? I thought 90% Americans are degree holders. What about young people?


User currently offlineB777LRF From Luxembourg, joined Nov 2008, 1208 posts, RR: 3
Reply 24, posted (3 years 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 5734 times:

Have several friends, close and less so, flying around the US for airlines such as American, ASTAR, Kalitta and United. Not one of them have a degree, a point most of them have pointed to as being utterly irrelevant to the task of poling several hundred tons of aircraft around the skies. Being a ATPL holder myself, and also living blissfully without a degree, I'd tend to agree.


From receips and radials over straight pipes to big fans - been there, done that, got the hearing defects to prove
25 AirNZ : . What exactly do you mean though......a university Degree as recognised as such by all countries, or the 'college degree' which is worthless (as a D
26 United Airline : Any recognized degree I mean. Just wanna know about US pilots
27 jimbobjoe : Right about the same, 30%.
28 AirNZ : But, in reality, is that 30% of the population with universally regognised university Degrees, or what Americans see/accept as Degrees (as in College
29 vfw614 : So you refer to a bachelor's degree, awarded by a US-style college, as a minimum? Or are there any other "recognized degrees" that require less than
30 YokoTsuno : In fact this is true for every profession. In the real world however, it doesn't work that way. Most people would generally accept that a pilot does
31 Aesma : But that's because there isn't a degree in piloting to begin with ! Or is there ? Pilots definitely need qualifications, it just happens that it has
32 AirNZ : Then you'd be quite mistaken, and also misunderstanding my comment. By a 'universally recognised degree' I was referring to that obtained from an acr
33 mayor : In terms of education, what do you consider the difference, if any, between a university and a 4 year college? As far as I know, all 4 year colleges
34 C767P : If you like marine biology/geology, stick with it. I did not get a degree in aviation because I wanted to have a backup in case I couldnt find a job
35 falstaff : A very large number of high school students go to college. The school were I teach has a college acceptance rate at around 85% We have no idea how ma
36 FlyFL : I think that there is a misunderstanding here and it really comes down to semantics. In the United States, schools that offer 4 year degrees (BA or B
37 Post contains links ADent : Here is a nice infographic showing US degrees by county: http://chronicle.com/article/Adults-With-College-Degrees-in/125995/ . According to that 27.5%
38 Post contains links mffoda : For anyone who is interested, Wiki has a pretty good read on how the use of College & University applies to different Countries... http://en.wiki
39 flyinghippo : An US Air Force Pilot is an officer, which requires a 4 year degree (in 99% of the cases). So if MaxQ does not have a 4 year degree, I'd assume he wa
40 falstaff : A university is made up of two or more colleges. You can have a four year degree and post graduate degree awarded by a college or a University. My BS
41 Post contains images PGNCS : I have a science degree and it came in handy when I got furloughed from my airline job. You definitely don't need a more aviation-focused degree! Tha
42 stratosphere : This is true..Like I believe you said in an earlier post most likely you would see a pilot at a major without one if he came in some other way like a
43 United Airline : Then most Americans are non-degree holders you mean? Bacelor's degree awarded by a college. What if he/she has all the flying hours/licenses? I know p
44 stratosphere : Well in the case of my friend he did have the hours and does not have a degree..You do not need a degree to fly there are plenty of non degree holder
45 pilotpip : I fly with pilots who hold aviation, business, science, finance, biology, and various other bachelor and masters degrees on a regular basis. No airli
46 Max Q : No, I have always been a Civilian Pilot. As far as I know the only Military Pilots that were not required to have degrees were Army Helicopter Pilots
47 charlienorth : I knew a pilot that graduated from H.S., learned to fly that summer, went to college for a year, flight instructed in the summer, went back for fall s
48 stratosphere : Isn't if funny that just a little flying experience got you into a cockpit of an airliner and respect and money the likes of which you do not see tod
49 Max Q : You have that right. The 60's and 70's truly were the golden age of Aviation for Airline Pilots.
50 Northwest727 : When I interned at a regional airline a few years ago, there were several pilots that did not have degrees. One kid got all of his certificates and ra
51 XFSUgimpLB41X : If you want to get hired by a top tier paying carrier such as United, Delta, Southwest, FedEx, UPS or American, you can pretty much forget it without
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