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Country Code In AC Registration Numbers  
User currently offlineYokoTsuno From Singapore, joined Feb 2011, 348 posts, RR: 0
Posted (3 years 7 months 3 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 4451 times:

Why is the country code in the aircraft registration number so odd? Germany and Vietnam for instance have a D respectively VN, which still makes sense, but what about the N and G for the US, UK.

19 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17171 posts, RR: 66
Reply 1, posted (3 years 7 months 3 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 4446 times:

G is probably for "Great Britain". Don't know why US has "N".


"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineDavid L From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 9541 posts, RR: 42
Reply 2, posted (3 years 7 months 3 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 4443 times:

Quoting YokoTsuno (Thread starter):
but what about the N and G for the US, UK.

"G" for Great Britain? A different system in the USA because there are so many aircraft registered there? I don't know why "N" was chosen.


User currently offline26point2 From United States of America, joined Mar 2010, 855 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (3 years 7 months 3 weeks 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 4423 times:

USA used NA and NC prior to N. .

User currently offlineNorthwest727 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 491 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (3 years 7 months 3 weeks 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 4410 times:

Quoting 26point2 (Reply 3):
USA used NA and NC prior to N. .

Prior to the 1950s or so, the second letter was to denote the category of aircraft. NC was a standard aircraft, NL was a limited aircraft, NR was a restricted aircraft, and NX was a experimental aircraft. At some point, the second letter was dropped, since it wasn't actually part of the registration anyways (ie, NC-54321 is the same as N54321) Older antique aircraft are still able to display older registrations like this, thanks to 14 CFR 45.22.

Edit: wikipedia has a good article on this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aircraft_registration#United_States

[Edited 2011-04-30 06:35:35]

User currently offlineYokoTsuno From Singapore, joined Feb 2011, 348 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (3 years 7 months 3 weeks 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 4308 times:

Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 1):
G is probably for "Great Britain".

I expected it to me more in line with the country codes used for other purposes like GB or UK. Some are even more off. KOR,KO, or KR is generally used for Korea but for aircraft registration it suddenly becomes HL. This looks totally random to me.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Country...des:_J%E2%80%93K#.C2.A0South_Korea

Quoting Northwest727 (Reply 4):
Edit: wikipedia has a good article on this:

I read this article before my post. It explains a lot but it does not really say where these codes came from.


User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25983 posts, RR: 22
Reply 6, posted (3 years 7 months 3 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 4292 times:

Some further history from the FAA.
http://www.faa.gov/licenses_certific...registry/aircraft_nnumber_history/


User currently onlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15830 posts, RR: 27
Reply 7, posted (3 years 7 months 3 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 4292 times:

Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 1):
Don't know why US has "N".

It stands for Navy. Many of the country codes used to register aircraft were based on the codes for radio callsigns. Since one of the major early users of radio sets was the US Navy, they got N allocated as a prefix for US radios. Then it was transferred to aircraft.

Also, for many years airport codes beginning with N were reserved for Naval Air Stations. which is part of how Newark got EWR, New Orleans got MSY, etc.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineNorthwest727 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 491 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (3 years 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 4210 times:

Quoting BMI727 (Reply 7):
It stands for Navy. Many of the country codes used to register aircraft were based on the codes for radio callsigns. Since one of the major early users of radio sets was the US Navy, they got N allocated as a prefix for US radios. Then it was transferred to aircraft.

Also, for many years airport codes beginning with N were reserved for Naval Air Stations. which is part of how Newark got EWR, New Orleans got MSY, etc.

Well, I'll be damned. I never knew nor did it seem like anyone else knew of the origin of the "N" in the USA's registration number. Certainly learn something everyday.


User currently offlineCOSPN From Northern Mariana Islands, joined Oct 2001, 1651 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (3 years 7 months 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 4148 times:

YokoTsuno


Hangul: 대한민국 is the name of Korea in Korean so HL makes some sense...


User currently offlineAsturias From Spain, joined Apr 2006, 2156 posts, RR: 16
Reply 10, posted (3 years 7 months 3 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 4035 times:

No idea why Spain has EC, Norway has LN or Iceland TF. I realize it comes from radio callsigns, but the origin seems arbitrary.

asturias



Tonight we fly
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17171 posts, RR: 66
Reply 11, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 3980 times:

Quoting Asturias (Reply 10):
No idea why Spain has EC, Norway has LN or Iceland TF. I realize it comes from radio callsigns, but the origin seems arbitrary.

Well, "E" in "EC" could stand for España. "N" in "LN" could stand for Norge.

Finland has "OY". Also a bit odd.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlinebond007 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 5451 posts, RR: 8
Reply 12, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 3973 times:

Quoting Asturias (Reply 10):
No idea why Spain has EC, Norway has LN or Iceland TF. I realize it comes from radio callsigns, but the origin seems arbitrary.

EC is for Espana Civil.

Jimbo



I'd rather be on the ground wishing I was in the air, than in the air wishing I was on the ground!
User currently offlineAsturias From Spain, joined Apr 2006, 2156 posts, RR: 16
Reply 13, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 3837 times:

Quoting bond007 (Reply 12):
EC is for Espana Civil.

Makes sense, thanks  
Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 11):
"N" in "LN" could stand for Norge.

Finland has "OY". Also a bit odd.

Indeed, the N could stand for Norge, but the L is quite confusing. The TF of Iceland contains no apparent connection to the name of the country, nor does OY for Finland, as you point out.

Probably arbitrary.

asturias



Tonight we fly
User currently offlineYokoTsuno From Singapore, joined Feb 2011, 348 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 3756 times:

I think I resolved a bit of the puzzle. The aircraft codes seem to be either one group or the full group of the ITU radio transmitter prefixes. Possible that in the early days of aviation they sort of looked at airplanes as "flying radio transmitters" and reserved one group for airplanes.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ITU_prefix

That still doesn't tell where the ITU radio transmitter codes come from.

E.g
AC Reg / ITU prefix

Korea HL / HLA to HLZ
Spain EC / EA to EH
Japan JA / JA to JZ
US N / NA to NZ
Finland OH / OF to OJ
Singapore 9V / 9VA to 9VZ
Finland OH /OF to OJ
Germany D / D
Belgium OO / ON to OT


User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6428 posts, RR: 3
Reply 15, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 3719 times:

In general-

This is one of the limitations of trying to represent a world with over 200 countries using an alphabet of 26 characters   Yes, you will end up with some oddballs, and find out that there's not enough characters to go around...and figure out that obscure treaties of the early 20th century on radios, telephony, and the like had quite a bit of input into the subject  



Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
User currently offlinelarshjort From Denmark, joined Dec 2007, 1524 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 3716 times:

Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 11):
Finland has "OY". Also a bit odd.
Quoting Asturias (Reply 13):
Indeed, the N could stand for Norge, but the L is quite confusing. The TF of Iceland contains no apparent connection to the name of the country, nor does OY for Finland, as you point out.

Just a minor correction, OY is Denmark. Finland is OH.

I do know that up until the late twenties, the danish registration prefix was T-.

/Lars



139, 306, 319, 320, 321, 332, 34A, AN2, AT4, AT5, AT7, 733, 735, 73G, 738, 739, 146, AR1, BH2, CN1, CR2, DH1, DH3, DH4,
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17171 posts, RR: 66
Reply 17, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 3675 times:

Quoting larshjort (Reply 16):
Just a minor correction, OY is Denmark. Finland is OH.

Oops! Sorry.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6428 posts, RR: 3
Reply 18, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 3669 times:

Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 17):
Oops! Sorry.

Don't you mean "Oy!"    



Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
User currently offlineAsturias From Spain, joined Apr 2006, 2156 posts, RR: 16
Reply 19, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 3570 times:

Quoting larshjort (Reply 16):
Just a minor correction, OY is Denmark. Finland is OH.

Thanks for the correction!  

asturias



Tonight we fly
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