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Type Rating And Different Engines  
User currently offlineA380Heavy From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2006, 258 posts, RR: 0
Posted (2 years 11 months 1 week 22 hours ago) and read 2956 times:

I was just wondering when pilots become type rated on a particular aircraft, for example on the Airbus A320 does he/she also have to become rated as A320 with IAE engines or with CFM engines too?

How easy is it for a pilot to adapt to different engine types on a familiar airframe - what sort of things does he/she have to be aware of?


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7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineRoseFlyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 9378 posts, RR: 52
Reply 1, posted (2 years 11 months 1 week 22 hours ago) and read 2925 times:

Maybe a pilot can speak to this, but I'd think the differences are barely noticeable when flying different engines. Some of the specific parameters might be slightly different such as N1% and EPM and performance numbers are different, but the airplane handles all that stuff.

The 757 and 767 carry the same type rating and are wildly different in terms of performance and of course have different engines. The differences for example between a 737 classic and a 737NG are significant, yet the pilots carry the same rating.



If you have never designed an airplane part before, let the real designers do the work!
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 16908 posts, RR: 67
Reply 2, posted (2 years 11 months 1 week 21 hours ago) and read 2866 times:

AFAIK the type rating is the same. However differences training may be required for different engines/manufacturers.


"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offline113312 From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 564 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (2 years 11 months 1 week 20 hours ago) and read 2841 times:

Type ratings are not engine specific.

User currently offlineB747FE From Hong Kong, joined Jun 2004, 230 posts, RR: 4
Reply 4, posted (2 years 11 months 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 2793 times:

Quoting A380Heavy (Thread starter):
I was just wondering when pilots become type rated on a particular aircraft, for example on the Airbus A320 does he/she also have to become rated as A320 with IAE engines or with CFM engines too?
113312 & Starlionblue are correct.

The type rating doesn't specify which engine you are allowed to operate.
You must however go through differences training as even within the same manufacturer, different engine versions may be substantially different.

Quoting A380Heavy (Thread starter):
How easy is it for a pilot to adapt to different engine types on a familiar airframe - what sort of things does he/she have to be aware of?

Not difficult at all. Just keep in mind the different operating techniques & limitations.

Regards,
B747FE.



"Flying is more than a sport and more than a job; flying is pure passion and desire, which fill a lifetime"
User currently offlineThrottleHold From South Africa, joined Jul 2006, 648 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (2 years 11 months 1 week 16 hours ago) and read 2769 times:

My type rating just says B777, but I fly 6 different variants with 5 different engine types.

User currently offlinejetpilot From United States of America, joined May 1999, 3130 posts, RR: 29
Reply 6, posted (2 years 11 months 1 week 13 hours ago) and read 2718 times:

The differences will be noted in the limitations section of the AOM. You are required to know all the limitations of all the engines your company operates on a given aircraft on your checkride.

User currently offlinePGNCS From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 2757 posts, RR: 45
Reply 7, posted (2 years 11 months 1 week 7 hours ago) and read 2640 times:

Differences training may be involved; the type rating is the same. Very often differences training is nothing more than a small handout or bulletin summarizing differences. In the case of closely related or derivative engines there may very well be no training of any sort involved although manuals will be updated as required (e.g. different thrust capabilities, etc.) This is pretty much a non-event for pilots, in other words.

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