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FOD Clean Up On Runways  
User currently offlinelke2fly From United States of America, joined May 2011, 70 posts, RR: 0
Posted (3 years 3 months 4 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 5722 times:

Does anyone know how often runways get cleaned at airports for FOD ?

19 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineNBGSkyGod From United States of America, joined May 2004, 815 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (3 years 3 months 4 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 5652 times:

Most airports do a FOD check pretty regularly during the day, usually its an airport ops vehicle driving along the movement areas looking for objects. When I was at BWI, AirTran had an airport FOD Walk of their ramp followed by a BBQ (lots of folks came for that), and when I was in the Navy once every 6 months we would have a FOD walk of all of the movement areas, were all of the base personnel would walk along the runways and taxiways (the airfield was closed for this).


"I use multi-billion dollar military satellite systems to find tupperware in the woods."
User currently offlinecontrails15 From United States of America, joined Oct 2008, 1181 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (3 years 3 months 4 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 5650 times:

At JFK, Port Authority will go down a runway with the truck looking for FOD. For our ramps, its the ground crews responsibility to FOD there gate pre and post departure. We also have cleaning crews that do that rest of the ramp. We also used to have FOD Fridays where management and people from our HQ came out and did FOD walks around the ramp. Pretty much a joke in my opinion because we of was too cold, raining or snowing on that day you didn't see them out there so why bother.


Giants football!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
User currently online26point2 From United States of America, joined Mar 2010, 825 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (3 years 3 months 4 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 5626 times:

I recall walking into an airport ops office once to find an attention-getting FOD wall display of items found at that airport....wish I could remember where that was.

Pretty amazing what can drop off a plane.


User currently offlinelke2fly From United States of America, joined May 2011, 70 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (3 years 3 months 4 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 5567 times:

I heard last night that there a big machine like a vacum cleaner that cleans the runways from FOD and rubber pellets left behind from jet wheels is this true?

User currently offlineunattendedbag From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 2327 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (3 years 3 months 4 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 5528 times:

Quoting lke2fly (Thread starter):
Does anyone know how often runways get cleaned at airports for FOD ?

A runway check is required at Part 139 airports once every 24 hours. This includes looking for lights that are out, FOD, pavement conditions and many other things. A runway isn't "cleaned" unless there is something to clean up.



Slower traffic, keep right
User currently offlineairkas1 From Netherlands, joined Dec 2003, 3991 posts, RR: 55
Reply 6, posted (3 years 3 months 3 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 5364 times:

We do runway inspections anywhere from once a day to 5-6 times a day, it mostly depends on the traffic. Usually about 30 mins before the charters we go over the runways to make sure there is no FOD lieing around.
FOD on the apron is cleaned up as we spot it.


User currently offlinetdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 79
Reply 7, posted (3 years 3 months 3 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 5349 times:

Quoting lke2fly (Reply 4):
I heard last night that there a big machine like a vacum cleaner that cleans the runways from FOD and rubber pellets left behind from jet wheels is this true?

It's an overgrown streetsweeper...I saw one somewhere in Southern California (Ontario? San Bernardino? Sacramento?...something like that) two weeks ago.

Tom.


User currently offlinejetlagged From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 2556 posts, RR: 24
Reply 8, posted (3 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 5265 times:

Pardon me for being pedantic, but FOD stands for Foreign Object Damage, the damage done to an engine by ingesting foreign objects. Thus the runway is the wrong place to look for FOD. It is of course the right place to look for objects which might end up causing FOD.  


The glass isn't half empty, or half full, it's twice as big as it needs to be.
User currently offlinetdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 79
Reply 9, posted (3 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 5253 times:

Quoting jetlagged (Reply 8):
Pardon me for being pedantic, but FOD stands for Foreign Object Damage, the damage done to an engine by ingesting foreign objects. Thus the runway is the wrong place to look for FOD.

Although technically correct, the word "FOD" is used extensively throughout aviation to refer to the debris itself, rather than the damage. It's a case of an acronym going beyond its original definition. It is now more properly defined as "Foreign Object Debris."

OEM's, regulators, airlines, mechanics, engineers, and pilots routinely refer to the bits they find as "FOD", you'll see it in accident reports, part teardown reports, inspection boards, etc.

Tom.


User currently offlinejetlagged From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 2556 posts, RR: 24
Reply 10, posted (3 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 5173 times:

Quoting tdscanuck (Reply 9):
Although technically correct, the word "FOD" is used extensively throughout aviation to refer to the debris itself, rather than the damage. It's a case of an acronym going beyond its original definition. It is now more properly defined as "Foreign Object Debris."

"Foreign Object Debris" is a tautology. Either "Foreign Object" OR "Debris" would be sufficient. I agree people loosely use FOD to mean the stuff that does the damage, but FOD has always meant, and still does mean, the damage itself.

Quoting tdscanuck (Reply 9):
OEM's, regulators, airlines, mechanics, engineers, and pilots routinely refer to the bits they find as "FOD", you'll see it in accident reports, part teardown reports, inspection boards, etc.

None of which makes it correct. It's actually very confusing to use the same acronym, in the same connection, for two different things.

Perhaps they should call the stuff that does the damage FID (Future Ingestion Debris) 

[Edited 2011-05-25 08:36:08]


The glass isn't half empty, or half full, it's twice as big as it needs to be.
User currently offlineLAXintl From United States of America, joined May 2000, 25348 posts, RR: 49
Reply 11, posted (3 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 5153 times:

At LAX, runway FOD inspection occurs once every hour, taxiways are observed continually, while terminal ramps are managed by tenants themselves.


From the desert to the sea, to all of Southern California
User currently offlinetdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 79
Reply 12, posted (3 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 5076 times:

Quoting jetlagged (Reply 10):
I agree people loosely use FOD to mean the stuff that does the damage, but FOD has always meant, and still does mean, the damage itself.

Well, to be blunt, no. In modern aviation usage, FOD can mean either the debris itself and the damage caused thereby. You can tell quickly which definition is in use by the context.

I agree with you that, historically and grammatically, it should be just the damage but that's just not how the term is used today.

Quoting jetlagged (Reply 10):
Quoting tdscanuck (Reply 9):
OEM's, regulators, airlines, mechanics, engineers, and pilots routinely refer to the bits they find as "FOD", you'll see it in accident reports, part teardown reports, inspection boards, etc.

None of which makes it correct.

True in a technical sense, but not really in terms of how English works. If everyone is using the word the same way, including all the technical people who actually use the word in its proper context and sense, using a common definition then eventually we have to concede that the definition has changed. When people say "Xerox" we know they don't literally mean "make a photocopy on a Xerox-brand photocopier" even though that's the technically correct historic definition.

Tom.


User currently offlinegocaps16 From Japan, joined Jan 2000, 4346 posts, RR: 20
Reply 13, posted (3 years 3 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 4849 times:

We do FOD walk downs twice a day before and after flight operations. At shore, on our ramp spaces; underway..hanger bay and flight deck.

User currently offlinePC12Fan From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 2442 posts, RR: 5
Reply 14, posted (3 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 4767 times:

In ramp and airfield classes that I teach, I like to refer to FOD as foreign object debris instead of foreign object damage. If foreign object debris is dealt with correctly, you won't have to worry about foreign object damage.


Just when I think you've said the stupidest thing ever, you keep talkin'!
User currently offlineJAGflyer From Canada, joined Aug 2004, 3526 posts, RR: 4
Reply 15, posted (3 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 4765 times:

At YYZ, most of the gates have a FOD-box where people throw garbage and whatever else they find into. I have never really seen them emptied but they usually contain a few waterbottles or random stuff. In my last job I was driving airside daily and occasionally found FOD around the aircraft. Things like hardware (from aircraft mx), empty catering trash (bottles, etc), baggage labels, etc. I just picked up whatever I could see and threw it in the truck or whatever.


Support the beer and soda can industry, recycle old airplanes!
User currently onlineLTC8K6 From United States of America, joined Jun 2009, 1209 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 4675 times:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foreign_object_damage

Pretty good going over of the term FOD.


User currently offlinetdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 79
Reply 17, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 4642 times:

Quoting LTC8K6 (Reply 16):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foreign_object_damage

Pretty good going over of the term FOD.

Nice work. "The "Damage" term was prevalent in military circles, but has since been pre-empted by a definition of FOD that looks at the "debris". This shift was made "official" in the latest FAA Advisory Circulars FAA A/C 150/5220-24 'Airport Foreign Object Debris (FOD) Detection Equipment' (2009) and FAA A/C 150/5210-24 'Airport Foreign Object Debris (FOD) Management'."

I did cross check the AC's to make sure wikipedia was right, and it is. Can we admit now that it actually stands for "Foreign Object Debris"? Kind of like how ETOPS just stands for "Extended Range Operations"?

Tom.


User currently offlineSkydrol From Canada, joined Oct 2003, 970 posts, RR: 10
Reply 18, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 4635 times:

Quoting tdscanuck (Reply 17):
Nice work. "The "Damage" term was prevalent in military circles, but has since been pre-empted by a definition of FOD that looks at the "debris". This shift was made "official" in the latest FAA Advisory Circulars FAA A/C 150/5220-24 'Airport Foreign Object Debris (FOD) Detection Equipment' (2009) and FAA A/C 150/5210-24 'Airport Foreign Object Debris (FOD) Management'."

I did cross check the AC's to make sure wikipedia was right, and it is. Can we admit now that it actually stands for "Foreign Object Debris"? Kind of like how ETOPS just stands for "Extended Range Operations"?

MD covered both definitions with their 'FOD Free' campaign as seen in this decal photo:





LD4



∙ ---{--« ∙ ----{--« ∙ --{-« ∙ ---{--« ∙ --{--« ∙ --{-« ∙ ----{--« ∙
User currently offlinegc2 From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2008, 53 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 4378 times:

At STN we do a one way FOD check @40mph every hour, then 4 or more full inspections (20 mph, each side and all entry and exit points too) in a 24 hour period. Also if we have a local standby, bird strike, VVIP flight or full emergency there is always a Fod inspection.

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