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Additional Flight Testing After Delivery?  
User currently offlinenotaxonrotax From Netherlands, joined Mar 2011, 404 posts, RR: 0
Posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 10 hours ago) and read 2235 times:

Hi all,

looking at this pic today, and reading the comment:

http://www.airliners.net/photo/Korean-Air/Airbus-A380-861/1936055/L/

And it made me wonder, do governments require additional certifications for a new type of aircraft only?
Or does every single airframe has to undergo this before being registered?
Are these test more rigorous in any way than previous tests?

My LSA requires an inspection from the local authorities but she has not enjoyed an F-registration for Airbus nor an N for Boeing! I would have thought that Korean Airlines (in this case) would have had authorities in the loop as she passed all tests in France? These additional tests cost a lot of time and money, no?


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2 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinetdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 79
Reply 1, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 6 hours ago) and read 2161 times:

Quoting notaxonrotax (Thread starter):
And it made me wonder, do governments require additional certifications for a new type of aircraft only?

Some do, although it's not that common. More common on a very new type than one that's established and just new to that country.

Quoting notaxonrotax (Thread starter):
Or does every single airframe has to undergo this before being registered?

Generally no. Once the type design is certified and the certification accepted by the registering regulator (Korea, in this case) there shouldn't be any requirement for additional per-aircraft testing.

Quoting notaxonrotax (Thread starter):
Are these test more rigorous in any way than previous tests?

It depends on why they're doing them. If it's because they want the operator to prove they can handle the aircraft (not that unusual for first-of-type for an airline) then generally not. If it's because they have some regulatory requirement that's different than the regulator that originally granted the type certification, then it may be more rigorous.

Quoting notaxonrotax (Thread starter):
I would have thought that Korean Airlines (in this case) would have had authorities in the loop as she passed all tests in France?

It would really be up to the Korean regulator, not Korean Airlines, although you'd expect them to be in close cooperation. The Korean regulator may have just decided it wanted to do the tests on "home turf." Regulators are members of the civil service, so they don't typically have huge budgets...it's a lot cheaper to bring the airplane to you than to send all the people from Korea to Toulouse.

Quoting notaxonrotax (Thread starter):
These additional tests cost a lot of time and money, no?

Yes.

Tom.


User currently offlinezeke From Hong Kong, joined Dec 2006, 9102 posts, RR: 75
Reply 2, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 6 hours ago) and read 2155 times:

Quoting notaxonrotax (Thread starter):

And it made me wonder, do governments require additional certifications for a new type of aircraft only?

In the jurisdictions that I am familiar with yes.

It is an operational demonstration that the normal procedures outlined in the manuals are the way the aircraft will actually be operated, i.e. SOPs, ramp/gate procedures, load sheets, performance, safety demonstrations etc.

Once these are complete, the new type is added to the air operates certificate, and then commercial operations can commence with the new type. For a twin, these test normally also include a simulated ETOPS sector, with a ETOPS diversion, for the A380 I would imagine it would be a return flight to an outport, turn the aircraft around, and return the point of origin.

The test would not include the sort of flight testing done in the predelivery tests in TLS.



We are addicted to our thoughts. We cannot change anything if we cannot change our thinking – Santosh Kalwar
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