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Exterior Cameras: What For?  
User currently offlinebristolflyer From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 2297 posts, RR: 0
Posted (2 years 11 months 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 4122 times:

So I have heard a few airlines have cameras mounted on the exteriors of their planes (tail/gear etc) - why do they do this? I'm sure it makes for some good viewing when landing/taking off, but there must be a higher purpose than this.


Fortune favours the brave
13 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently onlinejetblueguy22 From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 2798 posts, RR: 4
Reply 1, posted (2 years 11 months 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 4106 times:
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I believe the A380 cockpit has a link to the tail or nose camera. Im sure its gotta be tough to maneuver that baby on the ground. They maybe could use them during taxi. But even besides that it makes for a nice pax experience. That's a cool little feature to have.
Blue



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User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17040 posts, RR: 66
Reply 2, posted (2 years 11 months 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 4093 times:

A380 and A345/346 have these. They are to make taxiing easier in tight spots.


"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlinetdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 79
Reply 3, posted (2 years 11 months 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 4072 times:

Quoting bristolflyer (Thread starter):

So I have heard a few airlines have cameras mounted on the exteriors of their planes (tail/gear etc) - why do they do this?

On many airliners, you can't see any of the wing, gear, engines, or tail from the flight deck. This makes taxing in tight locations very difficult.

Tom.


User currently offlineGST From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2008, 932 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (2 years 11 months 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 4029 times:

http://www.aircraftsecurity.co.uk/

These guys make external cameras for retrofit, and security of parked aircraft is a big pert of their sales pitch. I guess sometimes some operators park their aircraft either habitually or overnight in dodgy airports.


User currently offlinefoxxray From France, joined May 2005, 385 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (2 years 11 months 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 4012 times:

There is also the EVS (Enhanced Vision System), mostly used on business jets, helicopters and i think on Fedex MD11.
Inspired by the FLIR, the EVS is an infrared camera which provides visual image of the runway even at night and in low visibility conditions...


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 6, posted (2 years 11 months 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 3983 times:

A Better view from a wider angle to enable manuvering the aircraft on ground.Which otherwise is not clearly visible from the Flight Deck/Cockpit.


Think of the brighter side!
User currently onlinehorstroad From Germany, joined Apr 2010, 268 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (2 years 11 months 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 3964 times:

on the 777F there are cameras to observe the cargo doors. the one for the main cargo door is located in the left hand horizontal stabilizer. there is a control panel with monitors next to the main entry door.

here you can see it: http://www.airliners.net/photo/LAN-C...d=121a568c6cb6f960d8036fc1233f67db

[Edited 2011-10-25 03:26:13]

User currently offlineBoeingGuy From United States of America, joined Dec 2010, 3076 posts, RR: 7
Reply 8, posted (2 years 11 months 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 3834 times:

The 777-300 and -300ER have taxi cameras in which the crew can view the two main landing gear and nosewheel gear on one of the multifunctional flight deck displays. It's due the length of the airplane and the distance from the flight deck to the main landing gears. That way the crew can monitor the landing gear and make sure they aren't going to run off the pavement on tight turns. Apparently the A380, A345 and A346 have a similar installation for the same reason.

User currently offlineN243NW From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 1632 posts, RR: 20
Reply 9, posted (2 years 11 months 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 3811 times:

Another neat fact is that when Boeing first introduced the stretched 777-300, it developed an electrically powered vehicle similar to a giant stick insect to give pilots a taste of taxiing the beast. It included a 777 cockpit area, a metal structure that approximated the length and wingspan of the aircraft, and wheels placed in the same location as the actual aircraft's wheels. It was a lot less high-tech than cameras, but it did the trick.

I have a picture of the vehicle in a book of mine, but it's packed away for now. Otherwise, I'd be happy to scan and post it.



B-52s don't take off. They scare the ground away.
User currently offlineB6JFKH81 From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 2891 posts, RR: 7
Reply 10, posted (2 years 11 months 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 3759 times:

Quoting N243NW (Reply 9):
Another neat fact is that when Boeing first introduced the stretched 777-300, it developed an electrically powered vehicle similar to a giant stick insect to give pilots a taste of taxiing the beast. It included a 777 cockpit area, a metal structure that approximated the length and wingspan of the aircraft, and wheels placed in the same location as the actual aircraft's wheels. It was a lot less high-tech than cameras, but it did the trick.

I had to see what you were talking about, god bless google LOL! Stick insect is on the money!!!!

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"If you do not learn from history, you are doomed to repeat it"
User currently offlinebristolflyer From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 2297 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (2 years 11 months 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 3669 times:

Thanks everyone for your comments, I hadn't thought about the taxiing thing.

Quoting horstroad (Reply 7):
on the 777F there are cameras to observe the cargo doors.

Why so? For security/stowaway reasons?



Fortune favours the brave
User currently offlineZANL188 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 3525 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (2 years 11 months 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 3662 times:
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Quoting N243NW (Reply 9):
Another neat fact is that when Boeing first introduced the stretched 777-300, it developed an electrically powered vehicle similar to a giant stick insect to give pilots a taste of taxiing the beast. It included a 777 cockpit area, a metal structure that approximated the length and wingspan of the aircraft, and wheels placed in the same location as the actual aircraft's wheels. It was a lot less high-tech than cameras, but it did the trick.

I have a picture of the vehicle in a book of mine, but it's packed away for now. Otherwise, I'd be happy to scan and post it.

Boeing did something similar for the 747 back in the 60's.



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User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17040 posts, RR: 66
Reply 13, posted (2 years 11 months 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 3649 times:

Quoting ZANL188 (Reply 12):
Boeing did something similar for the 747 back in the 60's.

That was "Waddell's Wagon", named for test pilot Jack Waddell. Turned out it wasn't needed.




"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
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