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Relaxed Crew On This Cargolux 747  
User currently offlineHighlandExpress From UK - Scotland, joined Aug 2011, 21 posts, RR: 0
Posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 22485 times:

Just browsing the new images this evening and came across this, I noticed both the crew have their feet on or near the consoles to the front, very close to some or the contol knobs! Is this common practice and what if one had sneezed? Just curious......


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[Edited 2011-11-07 22:24:06 by wilco737]


I am from Scotland, but I live in Germany.....
15 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21865 posts, RR: 55
Reply 1, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 22421 times:

Quoting HighlandExpress (Thread starter):
very close to some or the contol knobs!

Very non-essential control knobs. You'll also note that the captain's foot is on the footrest which is specifically designed for that purpose

Quoting HighlandExpress (Thread starter):
what if one had sneezed?

Probably nothing. If a knob had been moved, the solution would be to move it back to where it was. No problems.

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently offlinewilco737 From Greenland, joined Jun 2004, 9118 posts, RR: 76
Reply 2, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 22298 times:
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Quoting HighlandExpress (Thread starter):

That is even a footrest. You can set your foot there. Nothing you can cause with your foot there at all... So just sit back, relax and enjoy the looooong flights.

wilco737
  



It it's not Boeing, I am not going.
User currently offlineHighlandExpress From UK - Scotland, joined Aug 2011, 21 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 22001 times:

Hey, thanks for that...


I am from Scotland, but I live in Germany.....
User currently offlineHAL From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 2572 posts, RR: 53
Reply 4, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 15540 times:

Those footrests (or something similar) have been standard on all Boeing equipment since the 707. It helps keep a little circulation going if you can move your legs around in the cockpit, since you aren't supposed to get up all the time while on duty. So we'll keep them down by the rudder pedals for a while, then up on the footrests, then back, etc. On the 767 I fly I've occasionally tapped one of the upper buttons on the FMS panel with the sole of my foot, but all that does is change what's shown on the FMS screen. It's not like you can shut off the engines, or depressurize the plane that way. 
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HAL



One smooth landing is skill. Two in a row is luck. Three in a row and someone is lying.
User currently offlinewn700driver From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 15358 times:

Quoting HAL (Reply 4):

Or hit Gary Larson's "wings fall off" button.


User currently offlinedubliftment From Germany, joined Sep 2007, 56 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 14836 times:

Quoting HighlandExpress (Thread starter):
what if one had sneezed?

I think the worst thing that could happen there was that someone spills their coffee. Cleaning coffee traces from flight deck is a frequent maintenance procedure by the way.


User currently offlineCptRegionalJet From Germany, joined Oct 2007, 123 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 14241 times:

Quoting HighlandExpress (Thread starter):
Is this common practice and what if one had sneezed? Just curious......

I think they would have lost control istantly...         


User currently offlineSASDC8 From Norway, joined Mar 2006, 769 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 13464 times:
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Quoting wn700driver (Reply 5):
Or hit Gary Larson's "wings fall off" button.

     



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User currently offlinepliersinsight From United States of America, joined May 2008, 499 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 10065 times:

Quoting HAL (Reply 4):
Those footrests (or something similar) have been standard on all Boeing equipment since the 707. It helps keep a little circulation going if you can move your legs around in the cockpit, since you aren't supposed to get up all the time while on duty. So we'll keep them down by the rudder pedals for a while, then up on the footrests, then back, etc. On the 767 I fly I've occasionally tapped one of the upper buttons on the FMS panel with the sole of my foot, but all that does is change what's shown on the FMS screen. It's not like you can shut off the engines, or depressurize the plane that way.

HAL, from the picture you posted it shows that the rests on the first officer's side are well worn and on the Captain's side, the paint is all there. The sidekick must get to kick back a bit more over at HA.  


User currently offlinemodesto2 From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 2819 posts, RR: 5
Reply 10, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 6578 times:

I used to always use the footrests in the ERJ cockpit. As HAL said, it's a great way to circulate blood and gain more comfort in an otherwise stagnant position.

User currently offlineflyingalex From Germany, joined Jul 2010, 1027 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 6540 times:

Quoting HAL (Reply 4):
Those footrests (or something similar) have been standard on all Boeing equipment since the 707. It helps keep a little circulation going if you can move your legs around in the cockpit, since you aren't supposed to get up all the time while on duty.

Airbus has some too:


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The pairs of long triangular blocks under the instrument displays are two footrests for each of the pilots. The blocks move down about 10-15 centimetres when you put your foot on them, but are spring-loaded so that they are returned to the normal position when not in use.

I couldn't find a picture of anyone using them, but rest assured, they get used a lot.

[Edited 2011-11-06 09:03:45]


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User currently onlinehorstroad From Germany, joined Apr 2010, 284 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 3831 times:

Quoting pliersinsight (Reply 9):
HAL, from the picture you posted it shows that the rests on the first officer's side are well worn and on the Captain's side, the paint is all there.

maybe the captain's had to be replaced bacause they were worn even more 


User currently offlinevikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 10338 posts, RR: 26
Reply 13, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 3800 times:

Quoting Mir (Reply 1):
Probably nothing. If a knob had been moved, the solution would be to move it back to where it was.

  

That actually made me laugh out loud!

Clearly we'll have to spice that up for the resulting news report(s), expert interviews ("I've always said Boeing should remove those footrests!"), investigation, and certainly for the made-for-TV movie!



How can I be an admiral without my cap??!
User currently offlineBarney Captain From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 998 posts, RR: 12
Reply 14, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 3699 times:

Quoting HAL (Reply 4):
Those footrests (or something similar) have been standard on all Boeing equipment since the 707. It helps keep a little circulation going if you can move your legs around in the cockpit, since you aren't supposed to get up all the time while on duty. So we'll keep them down by the rudder pedals for a while, then up on the footrests, then back, etc. On the 767 I fly I've occasionally tapped one of the upper buttons on the FMS panel with the sole of my foot, but all that does is change what's shown on the FMS screen. It's not like you can shut off the engines, or depressurize the plane that way

While that's certainly how I use them as well - believe it or not, their initial design function (stemming back to the 707) was for a place to lock your feet to provide leverage in overcoming a jammed stab. Believe it or not  



...from the Banana Republic....
User currently offlineKAUSpilot From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 1963 posts, RR: 32
Reply 15, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 3687 times:

There is some danger of hitting buttons on the side of the FMS CDU's with your foot. Most notably the F/O could hit the GPS inhibit button on the 744 if they happen to be on the POS REF page, which would degrade navigational performance and lead to a bust. Additionally you get to the POS REF page by pushing R6 from Progress Page 1, which is one of the most common pages to have displayed during cruise....so if your foot mashes R5 and R6 simultaneously it could cause some problems if you're on prog page 1.

Hopefully the crew would catch the problem via the EICAS advisory message "UNABLE RNP" before it ever got that far. The F/O could also hit the ADS EMERG button at R5 if they happen to be on the ATC LOGON/STATUS screen in CPDLC operations (this would set off alarms at the ATC facility and likely lead to questions that you'd rather not answer).

The legs page is a pretty safe one to be on if you're going to put your foot up there, methinks.

That's not meant to criticize this Cargolux crew; it's perfectly safe as long as you're careful not to hit a bunch of buttons on the CDU.


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