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Hand-propping In Flight: How Easy?  
User currently offlinetimz From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 6704 posts, RR: 7
Posted (2 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 3767 times:

Woulda thought it would be hard to succeed-- could it really work?

http://www.flickr.com/photos/34076827@N00/4587719364

8 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineFly2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (2 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 3742 times:

I bet it's much more easier than on the ground. You have air flowing through the propeller to help get it going.

Heck, I'm actually surprised the prop is fully stopped. Then again it is a light wooden prop, they have much less momentum than their metal counterparts. Either way I'm sure it fired up right away.

In very cold mornings I hand prop our planes before starting the engine to get some oil flowing (as minimal as it may be). I sometimes need to ask my students to help me do it. (then again the IO-360 is much larger than what a Cub has)

[Edited 2012-02-16 16:44:34]

User currently offlineMax Q From United States of America, joined May 2001, 4059 posts, RR: 19
Reply 2, posted (2 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 3732 times:

Ok, that has my vote for the most stupid thing i've seen a Pilot do..


The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.
User currently offlinejetblueguy22 From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 2646 posts, RR: 4
Reply 3, posted (2 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 3654 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

I look at that picture and just thought, oh hes going places. Unfortunately its the sea below him.
Not the smartest idea.
Blue



You push down on that yoke, the houses get bigger, you pull back on the yoke, the houses get bigger- Ken Foltz
User currently offlineFly2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (2 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 3612 times:

Quoting jetblueguy22 (Reply 3):
Unfortunately its the sea below him.

Looks more like a dam to me.

Quoting Max Q (Reply 2):
Ok, that has my vote for the most stupid thing i've seen a Pilot do..

Oh trust me I've seen worse.


User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6264 posts, RR: 4
Reply 5, posted (2 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 3535 times:

Quoting Fly2HMO (Reply 4):
Quoting Max Q (Reply 2):
Ok, that has my vote for the most stupid thing i've seen a Pilot do..

Oh trust me I've seen worse.

Just remembering the scene in "Never Cry Wolf" where the pilot steps out on the float in a DeHavilland Beaver and fixes the engine in flight after suffering an in-flight engine failure   And to top it off, he has a non-pilot passenger hold the controls while he did it  



Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
User currently offlineFly2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (2 years 1 month 4 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 3341 times:

Quoting KELPkid (Reply 5):
And to top it off, he has a non-pilot passenger hold the controls while he did it

In real life I rather trust my trim alone than a passenger sitting inside shitting brix.


User currently offlineglen From Switzerland, joined Jun 2005, 211 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (2 years 1 month 4 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 3324 times:

Quoting Fly2HMO (Reply 1):
Heck, I'm actually surprised the prop is fully stopped.

It won't happen in a "normal" engine failure case. But here I'm sure they did it by intention to get this picture. Just slow down the plane close to stall speed (33 kts on the cub!) after closing the mixture and the prop will stop.

But once the prop is fully stopped, you need quite some speed (and therefore altitude) to bring it again into the windmilling state - or the helpful hand of your pax like in the picture  Smile

[Edited 2012-02-17 09:14:53]


"The horizon of many people is a circle with zero radius which they call their point of view." - Albert Einstein
User currently offlineMax Q From United States of America, joined May 2001, 4059 posts, RR: 19
Reply 8, posted (2 years 1 month 4 weeks ago) and read 3134 times:

Quoting Fly2HMO (Reply 4):

Oh trust me I've seen worse.

I am impressed..



The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.
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