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Deicing Engine Inflight  
User currently offlineThe Ticketor From Norway, joined Oct 2000, 434 posts, RR: 1
Posted (12 years 6 months 2 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 1613 times:

Does anybody know if it's possible to de-ice an engine in-flight by injecting de-icing fluid into it? I hear about this today, but not sure if it's true. This was supposedly done by an IB MD-80 landing at ARN yesterday.

17 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineSUDDEN From Sweden, joined Jul 2001, 4130 posts, RR: 6
Reply 1, posted (12 years 6 months 2 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 1540 times:

Funny that you bring this up. I did read that article, and wonderd the same thing.


When in doubt, flat out!
User currently offlineEWR757 From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 360 posts, RR: 8
Reply 2, posted (12 years 6 months 2 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 1530 times:



Complete BS. Jet engines (frontal areas, cowl, vanes, blades) are "anti" iced by bleed air.

More proof that 99% of what is written by non aviation specific journalists is lacking any basis of fact.


User currently offlineSafetyDude From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 3795 posts, RR: 15
Reply 3, posted (12 years 6 months 2 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 1532 times:

I know when the L-1011 wanted to deice it's wing or something, they would have to turn galley power off.
But I think that was the WING not ENGINE...hmmm now I'm wondering  Confused
-Will



"She Flew For What We Stand For"
User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29788 posts, RR: 58
Reply 4, posted (12 years 6 months 2 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 1518 times:

I have to go with EWR757, However there have been propeller de-icing systems that used fluid.

But that pretty much went away in the 1950's



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offline411A From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 1826 posts, RR: 8
Reply 5, posted (12 years 6 months 2 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 1506 times:

Actually, propeller alcohol fluid deicing is still used on some models of light aircraft....and on the wing as well. The TKS system works quite well.
Jet engines use bleed air for anti-ice. However, it must be switched on in time otherwise it's DEICE time....with surprising results.


User currently offlineEssentialPowr From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 1820 posts, RR: 2
Reply 6, posted (12 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 1481 times:

The Hawker 800 uses anti ice fluid thru tiny pores in the leading edge of the wing, called a "weeping" wing.
Engine lips/inlets are heated w/ bleed air...


User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29788 posts, RR: 58
Reply 7, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 1431 times:

Yup...I have seen a couple of Skyvans with TKS installed for deicing the tail.


OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineThe Ticketor From Norway, joined Oct 2000, 434 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 1420 times:

So we agree that air was used (my theory all along), and not some fluid then?

User currently offlineTwotterwrench From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 1410 times:

Hot air on every case I know of. Some cowling inlets will use a boot (Dash 8 for one) for de ice, but even these are of course pneumatically operated. Any fluid going into the inlet would be for water injection purposes.

User currently offlineMetwrench From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 750 posts, RR: 2
Reply 10, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 1383 times:

Too bad P&W can't make an engine with enough "steam" to actually provide for engine inlet anti-icing.

User currently offlineTimT From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 168 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 1388 times:

All of the heavy commercial jets I know of use bleed air for de-ice. DC-9 has 3 valves mounted on each engine from the compressor, and the same duct that feeds the packs also delivers air to the wing and tail systems. The 3 valves on the engine route air to the inlet guide vanes and the fuel heater.

User currently offlineJETPILOT From United States of America, joined May 1999, 3130 posts, RR: 29
Reply 12, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 1373 times:

Metwrench ????

The 727 has engine TAI.

JET


User currently offlineTwotterwrench From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 1370 times:

Hey Jet, long time no see...metwrench is taking a jab at the PT-6...long time Garrett guy that one is...
Yet one more advantage to the PT-6, Metwrench, is that it doesn't need anti-ice on the inlet to the engine. That's what you get when you are smart enough to put the inlet inside of the cowling where it is protected from ice.. and FOD.. and flame-out from turning on your anti-ice... need I go on...Garretts.. ha.. such a silly little engine.


User currently offlineJETPILOT From United States of America, joined May 1999, 3130 posts, RR: 29
Reply 14, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 1370 times:

Guess I've been out of the loop too long !!!!

A kinder gentler Twotterwrench?  Smile Missed you too love muffin.

Hehehehe !!!!

JET


User currently offlineTwotterwrench From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 1361 times:

I know it's hard to believe Jet, but they actually branded me a trouble maker. Little ol me? So, tough as it is, I am trying to be a little less "antagonistic" at least in the tech and civil forums. Those weenies in non-av still get to "feel my wrath" when they say something stupid, but I enjoy the rest of the site so I am trying to behave myself....it's tough...

User currently offlineVC-10 From United Kingdom, joined Oct 1999, 3697 posts, RR: 34
Reply 16, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 1324 times:
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SafetyDude,

I know when the L-1011 wanted to deice it's wing or something, they would have to turn galley power off. - WHAT?????????? I find that impossible to believe.


User currently offlineMetwrench From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 750 posts, RR: 2
Reply 17, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 1301 times:

Oh Twotterwrench, you silly Man.

Why not just put the inlet up front and do away with all those ice deflectors, actuators and ducts? Build a motor with enough steam to extract some "hot" bleed air to anti-ice the inlet in the first pace?

Oh! Silly me! Someone already did it! It's called a Garrett!


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